How To Start A Garden From Seeds

How To Start A Garden From Seeds

Get the timing right The goal with seed starting is to have your seedlings ready to go outside when the weather is favorable.It's easy to fill the trays, the watering system ensures consistent moisture and I can move them easily.Start with a fresh, sterile mix that will ensure healthy, disease-free seedlings.Remember that most mixes contain few, if any, nutrients, so you'll need to feed the seedlings with liquid fertilizer a few weeks after they germinate, and continue until you transplant them into the garden.It's helpful to make a couple divots in each pot to accommodate the seeds.Moisten the newly planted seeds with a mister or a small watering can.Set up a fan to ensure good air movement and prevent disease.Remember to feed the seedlings regularly with liquid fertilizer, mixed at the rate recommended on the package

How To Plant Dahlia Garden

How To Plant Dahlia Garden

They bloom in a rainbow of colors and in sizes, ranging from petite 2-inch pompoms to giant 15-inch “dinner plates.” Most varieties reach 4 to 5 feet tall.Though not well suited to extremely hot climates (such as southern Florida or Texas), dahlias brighten up any sunny garden with a growing season that’s at least 120 days long.In addition to coming in a rainbow of colors, dahlia flowers can range in size from petite 2-inch lollipop-style pompoms to giant 15-inch “dinner plate” blooms

How To Plant Victory Gardens

How To Plant Victory Gardens

In the past two years, victory gardening has seen a dramatic resurgence as more people discovered the practical benefits of growing food and self-reliance!The name comes from the Victory Gardens that were planted across the United States during World Wars I and II.Back in 1917, during World War 1, the National War Garden Commission promoted home gardening in order to free up crops to feed soldiers who were fighting overseas.They inspired students—calling them “soldiers of the soil”—to do their part in the war and help plant Liberty Gardens.Eleanor Roosevelt also began a new Victory Garden campaign after Pearl Harbor was bombed and Americans dug in once again for Uncle Sam.While empty shelves and supply shortages we may experience today do not compare to wartime, it’s no surprise folks returned to vegetable gardening.The goals today aren’t quite as ambitious, but growing your own food has become popular again.Like then, it provides a morale boost, lots of healthy outdoor time and exercise—and the satisfaction that comes with being even a little self-sufficient.It’s very rewarding to simply experience the miraculous process that is growing food and say, “I grew that!”.Growing your own food—even a little—also helps the environment; you’re using less chemicals, eating food that doesn’t have to travel across the country, and rebuilding your soil health.Lessen trips to the store and stretch your budget by planning meals around what is ready to harvest.Traditional crops included leafy greens, beans, watermelon, and tomatoes, but grow what your family likes to eat.Interestingly, crops including kohlrabi, Swiss chard, and kale were not common in the United States before Victory Gardens but Americans came to know these plants better because they were easy to grow.In many regions, many of the “cool-season” crops (leafy lettuces, root veggies, peas) are planted in March, but the “warm-season” crops (zucchini, cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers) are planted when the soil is warmer in June.Having the nursery start your warm-weather plants is more expensive but they’re ready to go, which is especially important if you have a short growing season.A favorite heirloom tomato is “Cherokee Purple” which is meaty and full of rich flavor.The hybrids are bred to resist certain diseases or tolerate drought or ripen earlier.Catalog companies are usually the cheapest source for seeds, plants, and supplies.Go to nurseries and greenhouses during off peak times to keep a safe distance from other shoppers.A typical garden needs about 1 inch of water per week unless the days are extremely hot.Also, be sure to water at the soil level and NOT from overhead as this causes leaf and plant disease.Walk around your garden daily and pick out competing weeds when they’re young, and check for insect issues.See the Almanac’s Growing Guides for vegetables, fruit, herbs, and flowers.When we were ordered to stay at home, I was glad to have some of the staples we had grown including potatoes, onions, squash, canned pears, tomato sauce, pesto, and frozen blueberries still on hand.There are several posts for container growing and balcony gardens for apartment dwellers too.I still have my Nana’s Victory Canning book from World War II.It is full of encouraging slogans like “Dig for Victory” and “Gardens Will Help.Weed ‘em and Reap For Victory” and “Keep the Home Soil Toiling”

How To Plant A Garden On Sims 4

How To Plant A Garden On Sims 4

If you have the Seasons Expansion Pack installed, it's even better, as it naturally pairs with Flower Arranging to be one of the most profitable skills in the game (though it's still eclipsed at high levels by Writing and Painting).Without the Seasons expansion pack, its profitability is limited but still high enough that it should be considered by most Generation-1 Sim families, especially given its low cost of entry.Depending on your gameplay style and goals, Gardening can take up most of a Sim's day and serve as their main job, or it can be a passing hobby that is used to support other aspects of life.At a basic level, a Sim can grow flowers or fruits and vegetables for their own private, occasional use.Gardening has a fairly low starting cost depending on the size of the operation you wish to run.Even better, as long as you care for your plants, they will grow forever; you won't need to worry about soil rotation or anything that complex.This can be done by opening the Sim's inventory panel and click-dragging the item onto its destination; it is not necessary to exit Live Mode or to pause the game.Note that large plants, such as apple trees, must have enough room to grow or your Sim will give you an error message.Death Flowers are also important high-level items, as it's an ingredient in the Ambrosia recipe that can revive dead Sims.Even without any expansion packs installed, you can use your phone to call a professional gardener who will come by every day and water all plants on your property, both inside and outside the house, as well as do any necessary weeding.However, this was represented by a flower face (smiling when watered, angry when not) that was surrounded by white petals that indicated the health level.When the meter reaches a white line, its quality will freeze until a gardener interacts with the plant and choose "Evolve.".Doing this will make a light circle the plant, permanently increasing its quality (and that of its flowers or fruit) to the next level.During any rain or storms, all outdoor plants will be water automatically, thus saving you time and money.Be careful during storms, as Sim-grown fruit trees have a slightly higher chance of being struck by lightning as other outdoor objects.Indoor plants have no seasonal restrictions, so wealthy gardeners who depend on them can build a massive grow facility to do most of the work.When your Sim reaches a high enough relationship level, Patchy will spontaneously come to life and start hanging out at your house.He acts as a full Sim and can be interacted with as normal, but he has a special AI routine that makes him want to garden.You can only make the request every 12 hours, but that should be plenty of time for him to help water or weed your plants on a large farm.When paired with a butler and a professional gardener, Patchy can ensure even the largest operations flourish even if your Sim decides to put his feet up and take it easy

How To Plant Garden Flowers

How To Plant Garden Flowers

Flowering plants always make your garden look more exciting (and can stop neighbors in their tracks).Then, if you already have established flower beds, you can easily place new annuals or perennials wherever you need to fill in some holes.In general, most flowering plants do best in soil that's loose and well-drained with a lot of organic material in it.place plant root balls into holes Credit: Brie Passano.Garden flowers generally need 1 to 2 inches of moisture every week to perform well, so water if you don't receive enough rain.It's best to water deeply and less frequently than shallowly and more often so the roots of the plants grow deeper.A layer of mulch like shredded bark around your new plants will help slow down evaporation and reduce how often you need to water

How To Start A Garden Design

How To Start A Garden Design

These steps will help you get started from scratch, but if you have something particular in mind, you could also use a garden plan to guide your design.If you choose vegetables and herbs for their contributions to your dinner table, plant ones your family will eat or be willing to try.Don't worry if your yard is mostly shady: You won’t be able to grow tomatoes in shade, but many other plants (such as hostas and outdoor ferns) will do just fine.They'll lead you through the procedure: How much soil to send from which parts of the garden and the best time to obtain samples.In addition to being low in essential plant nutrients, your soil may also have poor drainage or be compacted.Add a 2- to 3-inch layer of compost, decayed leaves, dry grass clippings, or old manure to the soil when you dig or till a new bed.Loosening the soil in new beds before sowing or planting helps roots to grow more easily and access the water and nutrients they need.Either way, work the soil only when it's moist enough to form a loose ball in your fist but dry enough to fall apart when you drop it.(Walking on prepared beds compacts the soil, so lay down plywood boards temporarily to evenly distribute your weight.).Some people pore over catalogs for months; others head to the garden center and buy what wows them.Either method works as long as you choose plants adapted to your climate, soil, and sunlight.Tomatoes and most annual flowers, on the other hand, prefer warm temperatures, so don't plant them until the danger of frost has passed in your area.If you're an adventurous beginner, get a head start on the growing season by sowing seeds indoors a few weeks before the last frost date.Follow seed packet instructions and place the containers on a sunny windowsill or under grow lights if you don't have window space.After that, how often you need to water depends on your soil, humidity, and rainfall, though once a week is a good place to start.Sunny, windy conditions dry out soil more quickly than cool, cloudy weather.Choose from a wide variety of mulches, each with its own benefits, including shredded bark, straw, and river rock.If you use organic mulch, such as bark, compost, or cocoa bean shells (which smell good, by the way), it will nourish the soil as it decomposes.removing weed roots with hand spade Credit: Jacob Fox

How To Plant A Garden In Wisconsin

How To Plant A Garden In Wisconsin

It can be difficult for first timers in Wisconsin to get their vegetables to grow, but that doesn't mean it's impossible.So whether you have a large yard to really dig into or you're scaling down to an apartment patio garden, it's important to account for how much space you have.No one vegetable is easier to grow than the other, but some common favorites for beginners are tomatoes, peppers, zucchini, snap peas, cucumbers, and even lettuce."What people really need to decide on when growing vegetables is whether they want to start with a seed or a potted plant," said Patti Sindberg, an employee at the Oconomowoc Landscape Supply and Garden Center.It's almost the beginning of summer, so there's a lesser chance of having to deal with frost or a cold front.If your garden is larger and in your back yard, it's recommended to mix some potting soil with the dirt you will be using to promote growth to the plants.Although gardening vegetables during spring in Wisconsin can be difficult, especially when it snows in April, and there can be cooler-than-normal days in summer.But if you're planning on growing things like peppers and tomatoes, the best way to protect your plants if there's a cold front is to cover them.If you're having a hard time getting your vegetable garden started or keeping it afloat, don't be afraid to ask for help

How To Plant A Garden From Plants

How To Plant A Garden From Plants

This year, we’ve added a “starter” garden plan consisting of easy-to-grow vegetables, companion planting techniques, and some lovely flowers!If you’ve never tasted garden-fresh food, you will be amazed by the sweet, juicy flavors and vibrant textures.If you have rocky soil, till and remove the rocks, as they will interfere with root growth and make for weaker plants.Stable and not windy: Avoid places that receive strong winds that could knock over your young plants or keep pollinators from doing their job.For example, a garden that feeds a family of four could include: 3 hills of yellow squash; 1 mound of zucchini; 10 assorted peppers; 6 tomato plants; 12 okra plants; a 12-foot row of bush beans; 2 cucumbers on a cage; 2 eggplant; 6 basil; 1 rosemary, and a few low-growing herbs such as oregano, thyme, and marjoram.Whatever the size of your garden: Every four feet or so, make sure that you have paths that allow you to access your plants to weed and harvest.Just make sure that you can reach the center of the row or bed easily without stepping on the soil.However, it would also be wise to contact your state’s Cooperative Extension Service to find out what plants grow best in your area.For example, if you live in an area with extremely hot weather, vegetables that prefer cooler temps may struggle.Mix in flowers such as marigolds—which discourage pests, attracts pollinators, and adds some color!(Of course, you could always give excess veggies away to friends, family, or the local soup kitchen.).Also, certain veggies are so far superior when homegrown, it’s almost a shame not to consider them (we’re thinking of garden lettuce and tomatoes).Or, you could just grow cool-season crops such as lettuce, kale, peas, and root veggies during the cooler months of late spring and early fall.A few extra cents spent in spring for that year’s seeds will pay off in higher yields at harvesttime.“Cool-season” vegetables such as lettuce and brocoil and peas grow in cooler weather of early spring (and fall).“Warm-season” such as tomatoes and peppers and cucumbers aren’t planted until the soil warms up in late spring and summer.If you’re planning on growing “perennial” crops such as asparagus, rhubarb, and some herbs, provide permanent locations or beds.Consider that some crops mature quickly and have a very short harvest period (radishes, bush beans).Every region has a different planting time based mainly on their weather, and every vegetable has its temperature preferences, too.For specific planting information, see our individual Grow Guides for over 100 popular vegetables, herbs, and fruit.For each crop, we provide specific information about how to plant, grow, and harvest, including watering and fertilizing and pest control!With this tool, draw your garden plan on the computer and drop in your preferred vegetables, and it automatically calculates the proper spacing for each type of crop!Over time, you’ll see that this tool also provides “crop rotation” so that if you plan a second season, you can properly reposition your plants to avoid pests and disease

How To Plant A Garden Rose

How To Plant A Garden Rose

With elegance, romance and nostalgia woven into every bloom, roses can elevate your garden to new levels of beauty and enjoyment.Many people mistakenly believe these timeless flowers are difficult to grow, but tending healthy, gorgeous garden roses can be very simple.Some roses, such as modern “hybrid tea" types, need mild climates, more attention and extra protection to survive winters.From delicate buds to big, voluptuous blossoms, they're just as beautiful as other types and often have showy fall rosehips, too.Try different kinds and record their secrets in your garden journal, so you can compare progress as your roses grow.Give them their own special spot and start a mini rose garden, or mix them in with other landscape plants.Whether you plan to plant in the ground or in a pot, roses need plenty of sunlight and air for healthy, glossy leaves and abundant blossoms.Giving your roses a good foundation of organic matter upfront helps them make the most of your soil, but they'll benefit from additional nutrients as they grow.Feed regularly throughout your growing season with a fertilizer that provides the special blend of nutrients roses prefer.That number, the “P" in the equation, stands for phosphorus, an essential plant nutrient that promotes good roots and lots of bigger blooms.By feeding your roses just the right balance of nutrients, you'll help support strong stems, glossy leaves and beautiful flowers.Water roses deeply and thoroughly, so that roots grow deep and strong to withstand hot temperatures and even drought.A layer of organic mulch around your roses helps maintain soil moisture and keeps dirt from splashing up on your blooms.Water your roses early in the day and at soil level, so leaves and stems stay dry.From single bud vases to billowing bouquets to petals floating in shallow bowls, roses bring garden romance indoors.Plan your flowery harvest for morning hours — after dew has dried, but before midday heat — when roses are well-hydrated and at their peak.Back inside your home, fill your vases or containers with water enhanced with a floral preservative

How To Plant A Garden Using Pallets

How To Plant A Garden Using Pallets

If this is something you want to experiment with, they’re the easiest raised garden bed ever and an eco-friendly, time-saving approach to growing flowers or vegetables at home.Check your local recycling center for information on where to find wood pallets to use as garden frames.When you locate wood pallets, make sure to choose ones that are in good, sturdy condition and have not been treated with pesticides.Label the rows by marking on the pallet with a permanent marker or a handmade wooden stake.When it’s time to rotate your garden at the end of the growing season, just lift the pallet from the ground and store away or move to next year’s location

What Is A Xeriscape Garden

What Is A Xeriscape Garden

Note that "xeriscape" is pronounced as if it began with the letter, Z, which sometimes leads to the misspelling, "zeroscape" (as if it signified "zero landscaping").This is unfortunate, because the word, "zero" leads the mind to think of "nothing"—in this case, a landscape with nothing in it (or nothing pretty, at least).Another widespread tactic is the deployment of native plants since they are adapted to the local climate and consequently require less human-supplied water.A plant considered drought-tolerant in the northeastern United States might be baked to a crisp in desert country.Here are ideas for a bed of flowers suitable for xeriscape landscaping across most of the northern United States.The middle row is staggered with drought-resistant perennials of intermediate heights: Moonbeam coreopsis, coneflowers, and 'Autumn Joy' sedum

How To Plant Garden From Seeds

How To Plant Garden From Seeds

This is often called “direct sowing” or “direct seeding.” In this article, we’ll talk about which vegetable are best seeded (vs

How To Plant Little Garden 2

How To Plant Little Garden 2

This year, we’ve added a “starter” garden plan consisting of easy-to-grow vegetables, companion planting techniques, and some lovely flowers!If you’ve never tasted garden-fresh food, you will be amazed by the sweet, juicy flavors and vibrant textures.If you have rocky soil, till and remove the rocks, as they will interfere with root growth and make for weaker plants.Stable and not windy: Avoid places that receive strong winds that could knock over your young plants or keep pollinators from doing their job.For example, a garden that feeds a family of four could include: 3 hills of yellow squash; 1 mound of zucchini; 10 assorted peppers; 6 tomato plants; 12 okra plants; a 12-foot row of bush beans; 2 cucumbers on a cage; 2 eggplant; 6 basil; 1 rosemary, and a few low-growing herbs such as oregano, thyme, and marjoram.Whatever the size of your garden: Every four feet or so, make sure that you have paths that allow you to access your plants to weed and harvest.Just make sure that you can reach the center of the row or bed easily without stepping on the soil.However, it would also be wise to contact your state’s Cooperative Extension Service to find out what plants grow best in your area.For example, if you live in an area with extremely hot weather, vegetables that prefer cooler temps may struggle.Mix in flowers such as marigolds—which discourage pests, attracts pollinators, and adds some color!(Of course, you could always give excess veggies away to friends, family, or the local soup kitchen.).Also, certain veggies are so far superior when homegrown, it’s almost a shame not to consider them (we’re thinking of garden lettuce and tomatoes).Or, you could just grow cool-season crops such as lettuce, kale, peas, and root veggies during the cooler months of late spring and early fall.A few extra cents spent in spring for that year’s seeds will pay off in higher yields at harvesttime.“Cool-season” vegetables such as lettuce and brocoil and peas grow in cooler weather of early spring (and fall).“Warm-season” such as tomatoes and peppers and cucumbers aren’t planted until the soil warms up in late spring and summer.If you’re planning on growing “perennial” crops such as asparagus, rhubarb, and some herbs, provide permanent locations or beds.Consider that some crops mature quickly and have a very short harvest period (radishes, bush beans).For specific planting information, see our individual Grow Guides for over 100 popular vegetables, herbs, and fruit.For each crop, we provide specific information about how to plant, grow, and harvest, including watering and fertilizing and pest control!With this tool, draw your garden plan on the computer and drop in your preferred vegetables, and it automatically calculates the proper spacing for each type of crop!Then you can print out your plan and the tool reminds you of your seeding and harvesting dates for every vegetable!Over time, you’ll see that this tool also provides “crop rotation” so that if you plan a second season, you can properly reposition your plants to avoid pests and disease

How To Plant A Dish Garden

How To Plant A Dish Garden

A dish garden is a collection of compatible plants growing and changing together over time in a small container.Using basic principles of design, you can create, in miniature, the feeling of a sumptuous full scale landscape.For example, if you expect to grow your dish garden in the often dry and dark open atmosphere of the home or office, select plants suited to this environment.Suitable containers include metal, china, glass, pottery, and plastic-lined wooden bowls, boxes, and baskets, and antique and reproduction items such as basin and pitcher sets.Cast-off and yard sale items often have interesting shapes and colors, including dishware, old gardening tools, outgrown toys, and bricks and concrete blocks.A container with simple lines and subtle colors permits the variety of exotic plants to catch the eye.Select a container deep enough to provide room for the roots, soil, and necessary drainage materials.Loose materials, such as small rocks, pea gravel, marbles, and coarse sands, provide drainage for a container with no holes.Coarse charcoal layered just above the rocks prevents sour soil, s common problem in dish gardens.Remember: A container with no drainage hole in the bottom requires a well-drained soil mix and careful watering.See the table at the end of this brochure for types of dish gardens, their plant selection, and special requirements.Miniature figures and ground objects, such as bits of wood, rocks, stones, and crystals make appropriate additions to a dish garden.Line the bottom of the container with loose drainage material to prevent the soil and roots from standing in water.On a sheet of paper, sketch a quick plan of your chosen arrangement or make an instant photo.Place your new dish garden in a warm, shaded location for two weeks to allow the fresh transplants to become established.Repot when the plants grow too large for the container or after a year or so when the soil nutrients deplete.Type of Dish Garden Plant Selection Ideas Sunlight Requirement Other Special Needs Bog Ground & club mosses, small ferns Full to part sun Desert Agave, aloe, cactus, crown of thorns,.echeveria, haworthia, house leek, jade, sun, kalanchoe, opuntia, panda plant, sedum, snake plant Full to part sun, Sandy soil Field and Meadow Ferns, fungi, grasses, hawkweed, juniper seedling, lichens, mosses, pussytoes, wild strawberry Full to part sun Herbs Chives, creeping thyme, rosemary, other small herbs Full to part sun, Sandy rocky soil Mediterranean Euphorbias, succulents, small cacti Full to part sun, Sandy soil Tropical Aspidistra, birdsnest fern, bromelia, Chinese evergreen, croton, dracaena, English and grape ivy, neantha bella Tropical palm, peperomia, philodendron, pittosporum, podocarpus, pothos, pteris fern, sansevieria, snake plant, ti plant, wandering Jew Shade, indirect light Violet Wild violets, small herbs Full to part sun Woodland Ferns, grasses, club, hair-cap, & minum.mosses, hepatica, mountain laurel, Woodland partridgeberry, pipsissewa, rattlesnake plantain, rock polypody, wintergreen seedling yew, fir, pine, & hemlock

How To Grow Edible Garden

How To Grow Edible Garden

An edible garden will allow you to reap a harvest from your yard without feeling like you’re running a farm.If you find yourself feeling intimidated by the thought of trying to make edible plants into a beautiful landscape, don’t worry.There are many reasons to create an edible garden such as saving money on groceries, enjoying the freshest possible produce, introducing kids to a healthy diet and lifestyle, growing a conversation starter and/or novelty garden, and beautifying your yard.For instance, if your goal is to grow as much food as possible, you will likely make different choices than if you simply want to add a culinary dimension to your flower bed.If your edible garden is in a highly visible spot, you’ll probably want to pay special attention to creating an aesthetically pleasing effect.Check to be sure your proposed garden site has enough sun and adequate soil quality for what you want to do.You’ll want to choose plants that complement and/or contrast with each other in terms of height, shape, color, texture, and growing habits, and place them so that they all work together to create a harmonious effect.Use colorful flower petals and blooms as stunning garnishes to make any meal feel special.They also are gorgeous added to salads, and many make fine herbal tea when dried.Some flowers, such as nasturtium and daisy, have edible leaves that can add a unique flavor to a tossed salad.Rosemary – Let the bushy branches of this woody perennial herb spread naturally, or prune it into a tree shape for a fragrant accent plant.When you look at them with unbiased eyes, many common vegetables have striking form and color and can really shine as accent pieces in the garden.The striking orange-red flowers look great on a trellis or trained up your garden fence or porch railing.Their huge orange blooms are actually edible, and the rambling leaves can set off taller flowers like sunflower, cosmos or hollyhock.The flowers, leaves and blooms of this quintessential Southern vegetable all have a sculptural quality that is unique to any garden plant.Unless you have a trellis you can train them up, choose indeterminate varieties that will stay manageable without a cage.Strawberry – This beloved little fruit makes a sweet statement in your garden and is eagerly sought out by kids and adults alike.For best results, consult a landscape professional for suggestions as to varieties that will do well in your garden, especially when selecting trees and shrubs

How To Plant A Garden Container

How To Plant A Garden Container

But with a little extra effort, you could plant truly stunning container gardens full of thriving flowers and foliage.They will chip and crack if handled too roughly, and can be damaged by freezing temperatures (empty and store them indoors for the winter in colder regions).They will chip and crack if handled too roughly, and can be damaged by freezing temperatures (empty and store them indoors for the winter in colder regions).Be careful when placing your concrete planters because they are extremely heavy and even more difficult to move once they're filled with soil and plants.Be careful when placing your concrete planters because they are extremely heavy and even more difficult to move once they're filled with soil and plants.To help them last longer, brush all surfaces with a clear waterproofing sealer labeled for use on outdoor wood.To help them last longer, brush all surfaces with a clear waterproofing sealer labeled for use on outdoor wood.all red and pink grouping of container garden plants Credit: Joseph Wanek.Fillers tend to be more rounded or mounded plants and serve the purpose of making the container look full.If you have a really large planter and would like to use less potting mix, turn smaller empty containers upside down and place them on the bottom to take up some space.Never add a layer of rocks to the bottom because this actually makes it harder for water to drain out, rather than helping.When you're ready to add plants, give their nursery containers a gentle squeeze around the sides to loosen the root ball enough until you can slide it out.Then, set your plants on the potting mix so that the top of their root balls are a couple of inches below the rim of your container.Fill in around your plants with more potting mix, making sure the stems are no deeper in soil than when they were in their nursery containers.Remember to keep the soil level a couple of inches below the rim of the container to help prevent water from spilling out whenever you pour some in.If you choose to use a saucer under the pot, make sure to keep it emptied so that the plant roots don't rot when sitting in the collected water.Related Items tall blue gray pot of flowers spruce creeping jenny hosta ivy top porch step Credit: Jason Donnelly Foliage First Container Idea Don't be afraid to mix up different types of plants such as annuals, perennials, vegetables, and even small shrubs.diamond patterned pot with flowers front porch Credit: Jason Donnelly Dark and Bold Container Idea Deep greens and purples add depth, even in shady places.This arrangement echoes the look of the container with dark, boldly textured foliage from 'Brit Marie Crawford' ligularia (thriller) as well as fillers such as 'Obsidian' heuchera, 'Fanal' astilbe, and 'Red Threads' alternathera.A spiller of blue-flowered lobelia, along with a silvery filler of Japanese painted fern, helps to set off the darker plants in this container garden.Caladium is definitely the thriller in this container garden, thanks to its large leaves with dramatic patterns and tall stems.For fillers, 'Diamond Frost' euphorbia adds delicate texture as well as flowers that continue the white color theme, while 'Nonstop Mix' and 'Angel Falls Soft Pink' begonias bring in ivory and blush hues that mimic the finish of the container.'Silver Falls' dichondra makes a fine spiller with its dangling stems of pale, silvery foliage

How To Plant Garden Flower Seeds

How To Plant Garden Flower Seeds

Perennial flowers may not bloom their first year, but if you have the patience to wait, you can fill your garden for a fraction of the cost of buying mature plants

How To Plant Lavender Garden

How To Plant Lavender Garden

In the northern limit of its range, mulching Lavender plants in late fall will protect them from the winter's cold.Prevent fungal diseases from getting started by spacing plants further apart and in a location with good air circulation.Also, sprays of insecticidal soap will kill these pests without harming other beneficial insects, wildlife, and pets.Decide if you want lots of baby lavenders in that area of the garden; otherwise deadhead regularly

How To Plant Garden Using Black Plastic

How To Plant Garden Using Black Plastic

To enjoy the maximum benefits and avoid some of the disadvantages of using black plastic in your vegetable garden, prepare the ground before spreading the mulch

How To Plant A Garden In Ohio

How To Plant A Garden In Ohio

Ohioans enjoy a reasonably long vegetable-gardening season, starting as early as March and stretching on through late November.He says to start with cool-season vegetables, such as broccoli, cabbage and peas, that can tolerate lower soil and air temperatures, even a frost.Bergefurd also suggests beginning with transplants for broccoli and cabbage, either grown from seeds indoors or purchased at a garden center.Warmer-season crops — squash, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers and beans — should be planted once soil temperatures reach 55 degrees or higher and the threat of frost has passed, typically in May.(Local soil temperatures can be found on the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center’s website, oardc.ohio-state.edu/weather1.).When Pam Bennett, horticulture educator and master garden volunteer program director at the Ohio State University Extension office in Clark County, teaches vegetable-gardening classes, she advises her students to always start with a plan.“If not, it’s way too easy to overplant when you go to the garden store and are tempted to buy the bargain four-pack of tomatoes for $1.99 versus the larger, single one for $1.29,” she says.The ideal location has six or more hours of sunlight, good drainage and easy access to a water source.Simply choose a place that gets the most sun or grow plants in containers on a sunny patio.Finally, sketch your garden layout in a loose-leaf notebook with page protectors for storing seed packets.Traditional wide rows are easy to weed and mulch, while hill planting warms the ground temperature for heat-loving squash and melon vines.Another option is planting varieties of the same vegetable that have different maturity dates (found on the back of the seed packets).Look for plants and seeds with names that include words such as patio, pixie, tiny, baby or dwarf.Amy Stone, educator at the Ohio State University Extension office in Lucas County, has plenty of experience growing food at her family’s farm and at several community plots, including one where she worked with volunteer youth to build a series of raised-bed vegetable gardens.These large wooden frames sit atop the ground and are filled with soil and plants.Stone says they tend to warm and drain quicker, making them easier to start in early spring.Next, line the underside with cloth or newspapers to keep grass or weeds from entering the raised bed garden.”.Soil: Fill the frame with a mix of topsoil and compost (leaf, mushroom or manure).Supports: Train sprawling plants like cucumbers to grow up wooden stakes or old tool handles by tying them with string, twine or stockings.Check the top and undersides of leaves for eggs, frass (insect excrement) and other clues.“Directly sow seeds in the garden as early as March or April to ensure a sweet, productive crop,” says Hogan.“Plant the seeds early in March or April, and give the vines a trellis to climb,” he says.“Avoid insect problems by using transplants and delay planting until a little later in the season, ideally mid-June,” says Hogan.Start with transplants, wait to plant them in warm weather, stake them and evenly water them throughout the season

How To Plant Garden Carrots

How To Plant Garden Carrots

Common Name Carrot Botanical Name Daucus carota Family Apiaceae or Umbelliferae Plant Type Vegetable Size 6 to 12 inch root, 1 foot foliage height; 9 inch spread Sun Exposure Full sun to part shade Soil Type Loose, well-draining soil Soil pH Slightly acidic (6.0–6.8) Bloom Time Spring (second growing season) Hardiness Zones 3–10 (biennial grown as an annual) Native Area Europe, Southwestern Asia.Growing carrots in raised beds with fluffy soil is the ideal situation.Correctly spacing carrots is the key to harvesting a healthy crop, but it's not always easy and requires plenty of thinning.Snipping or pinching the seedlings off at the soil line is the best way to avoid hurting the nearby roots.If your soil is not rich in organic matter, supplemental feeding will be necessary about two weeks after the carrot tops emerge.Because they are grown for their roots, don't go overboard with nitrogen fertilizer, which mostly aids foliage growth.Growing carrots (Daucus carota)—or any root vegetable, for that matter—can be a bit of a gamble because you can't see how well they're doing until you harvest.Test to see if the tops of your carrot plants have filled out to the expected diameter by feeling just below the soil line.To be on the safe side, it is wise to loosen the soil slightly before harvesting, making sure not to stab the carrots in the process.They will fork and deform if they meet with the slightest resistance, such as a rock or hard soil in the garden.The shorter finger-types or small round carrots, like 'Paris Market', or other types with roots that grow and mature to two to three inches long, are ideal for containers.Carrots can be planted from nursery-grown seedlings, but the more common method is to sow seeds directly into the garden as soon as the soil is workable in the spring.Till the soil at least a foot deep to make sure it is light and loose and can drain extremely well.Create shallow furrows in the soil (the long handle of a garden tool will do the job), 1/4 inch deep and one foot apart if you are sowing more than one row of carrots.Keep furrows moist and don't let the soil dry out because it will form a hard crust that is difficult for tiny seedlings to break through.Use tiny snips for this task so you don't pull up nearby developing carrot roots.You might even consider installing a fabric row cover if you live in a very cold climate.The carrot tops will die but the roots will continue gathering their sugar to survive the cold weather.You can foil some pests by rotating where you plant each year, but the easiest method is to grow your carrots under row covers (garden fabric).Nematodes, microscopic worms, can become a problem later in the season, causing badly deformed roots.Even if they don't notice the roots growing below the soil surface, there are plenty of animals that will want to eat the tops of your carrots and a few that will dig deeper.Clean up all debris at the end of the season and move your carrots to a different section of the garden next year because the microorganisms can persist in the soil.But given loose soil, some cool weather, and plenty of water, there's no reason you can't grow sweet, crunchy carrots.But there is a fun, entertaining project for kids involving putting the top stump of a carrot in a glass of water, held by toothpicks much as you would do with an avocado pit, and watching carrot roots grow in the water

How To Grow Garden Mushrooms

How To Grow Garden Mushrooms

This method is perfect for that shady, damp spot that you can’t figure out what to plant there – maybe it’s under a fruit tree, or around the back, next to the laundry.Wherever it is, as long as that spot doesn’t get a lot of daily foot traffic, a mushroom woodchip garden might be just the ticket.Here’s our step-by-step guide on how to make a King Stropharia woodchip garden, as taught by Paul Stamets of Fungi Perfecti.And when harvest time comes around, be sure to place your picked shiitakes in sunlight to enhance their vitamin D content.Then there’s the bucket growing option, another one of our favourite mushroom cultivation techniques for space and/or garden poor folks.Here’s a guide to growing mushrooms in a bucket, as well as some inspiration for what the end result can look like.Enokitake mushrooms love growing as the base of currant bushes, for example.Saffron milk caps are happiest (and only grow, infact) under pines.You could mix up a slurry of porcini mushrooms (old ones that weren’t good enough to eat) and try inoculating a few local oaks, like our friend Speedy (or Paul Ward, as his Mum calls him) recently did.Or you could make a mushroom garden bundle (also an innovation of Speedy’s) – which is a gorgeous way to bring new life to un-shroomed corners of your patch….Our dear friend and renegade mycologist Paul (Speedy) Ward showed us how to make these at our place last weekend, and they’re such a great idea – an inoculation bomb, if you will – think seed balls, but for mushrooms….In the middle you might like to tuck in a root cutting from something like comfrey, a great forest garden groundcover, and maybe some moss or other support species around the edges.Then take out of bucket, shake off excess water, and place under a particular type of tree, or on some wet woodchip or… whatever makes sense for that species

How To Plant A Vegetable Gardens

How To Plant A Vegetable Gardens

This year, we’ve added a “starter” garden plan consisting of easy-to-grow vegetables, companion planting techniques, and some lovely flowers!If you’ve never tasted garden-fresh food, you will be amazed by the sweet, juicy flavors and vibrant textures.If you have rocky soil, till and remove the rocks, as they will interfere with root growth and make for weaker plants.Stable and not windy: Avoid places that receive strong winds that could knock over your young plants or keep pollinators from doing their job.For example, a garden that feeds a family of four could include: 3 hills of yellow squash; 1 mound of zucchini; 10 assorted peppers; 6 tomato plants; 12 okra plants; a 12-foot row of bush beans; 2 cucumbers on a cage; 2 eggplant; 6 basil; 1 rosemary, and a few low-growing herbs such as oregano, thyme, and marjoram.Whatever the size of your garden: Every four feet or so, make sure that you have paths that allow you to access your plants to weed and harvest.Just make sure that you can reach the center of the row or bed easily without stepping on the soil.However, it would also be wise to contact your state’s Cooperative Extension Service to find out what plants grow best in your area.For example, if you live in an area with extremely hot weather, vegetables that prefer cooler temps may struggle.Mix in flowers such as marigolds—which discourage pests, attracts pollinators, and adds some color!(Of course, you could always give excess veggies away to friends, family, or the local soup kitchen.).Also, certain veggies are so far superior when homegrown, it’s almost a shame not to consider them (we’re thinking of garden lettuce and tomatoes).Or, you could just grow cool-season crops such as lettuce, kale, peas, and root veggies during the cooler months of late spring and early fall.A few extra cents spent in spring for that year’s seeds will pay off in higher yields at harvesttime.“Cool-season” vegetables such as lettuce and brocoil and peas grow in cooler weather of early spring (and fall).“Warm-season” such as tomatoes and peppers and cucumbers aren’t planted until the soil warms up in late spring and summer.If you’re planning on growing “perennial” crops such as asparagus, rhubarb, and some herbs, provide permanent locations or beds.Consider that some crops mature quickly and have a very short harvest period (radishes, bush beans).Every region has a different planting time based mainly on their weather, and every vegetable has its temperature preferences, too.For specific planting information, see our individual Grow Guides for over 100 popular vegetables, herbs, and fruit.For each crop, we provide specific information about how to plant, grow, and harvest, including watering and fertilizing and pest control!With this tool, draw your garden plan on the computer and drop in your preferred vegetables, and it automatically calculates the proper spacing for each type of crop!Over time, you’ll see that this tool also provides “crop rotation” so that if you plan a second season, you can properly reposition your plants to avoid pests and disease

How To Plant Front Garden

How To Plant Front Garden

There are lots of ways to create instant impact and maximise space out front, all whilst adding value to your property in the process, and no matter how small your front garden, is, with careful planning you can make it both a beautiful and useful space.Before your house comes into view, your front garden is the first thing visitors will see, and a neat exterior will most certainly create a warm welcome.Every time we walk to our car or out of our house, whatever the weather, we'll be immersed in this front garden, so why not give it the attention it deserves?Every road has a 'look' and if you take your front garden too far away from what's normal for your street, you will create a 'wow', but not in a good way.When it comes to a front garden lean towards well defined flower beds, straight lines and solid planting.The hardest look to pull off in a front garden is a wildflower meadow with plants flowing everywhere – go for the opposite of this and you'll be on the right track.The easiest way to do this is with a clear path and a big signal to mark the front door.Case in point: Dustbins can be a real eyesore, so screen them with shrubs or trellising, or invest in wheelie bin storage, or as horticulturist Alys Fowler suggests, 'Make your garden so pretty your eye won't be drawn to the bins at all!'.To find out what applies in your area, the planning department of your local council will be a good place to start.Suttons Charlbury Wall Trellis gardentrading.co.uk £35.00 SHOP NOW Use this to train up climbing plants.As a general rule, choose plants that flower in every season, that way you'll always have something new to welcome you home, and window boxes are great for adding a splash a colour.Shrubs which stay green and have a good bulk all year round are key to front gardens.Pretty much inevitably, if a tree is growing in a front garden, it's going to be close to the house.The biggest joy in gardening is to ring the changes: to herald spring, to celebrate summer and to the bask in a winter wonderland.Violas for winter, tulips in spring, alliums in summer and agapathus in autumn.As you get more confident you can start to get more adventurous with your containers and combine colours to make really bold and wonderful statements.The great thing about this is, if an experiment goes wrong and doesn't look good, a quick trip to the garden centre for some emergency flowering plants will fix it in an afternoon.A great low maintenance front garden idea, these will quietly get on whilst giving you shape and structure.The easiest solution to look after is paving – bricks, slabs, driveway pavers – but it can prove to be expensive to put these over the whole of the front, even if your garden is small, so gravel is a decent halfway house.Battery operated, warm, white fairy lights, wound around the structural plants like box balls will make the garden look wonderful in winter.You don't have to wait until Christmas and they don't have to come off in January, keep them going until spring for a really magical look which will make you, and the neighbours, smile.In your rear garden you can paint your fence blue, grow tropical plants and fill it with all the wonderful ornaments you like.A winding path might look lovely for a few days but you can be sure of two things – firstly, that you will curse having to go around and about just to get to your front door, and secondly, that people (including you) will cut the corners.It's not a good idea to put anything too expensive in the front garden, but there is a way to introduce luxury without that danger – think about the flooring you use.For example, if you live in a Victorian house have a look at reclaimed or replica tiles – these come in that classic chequerboard black and white or other geometric shapes.In a modern house, the luxury options for paving are things like travertine or reclaimed York stone, although porcelain is a great way to combine style and durability.House Beautiful Cube Boho Porcelain Wall and Floor Tiles, Homebase

How To Plant Garden Onions

How To Plant Garden Onions

If you can't plant your onions right away, remove their bindings and place them in a bucket with 2 inches of moist soil in the bottom.Improve your native soil by mixing in several inches of aged compost or other rich organic matter.Onions aren't great at taking up water, so it's important to keep soil moist so their shallow roots can drink up.For great results, start with Bonnie Plants® onion slips, strong plants grown by a company that has been helping home gardeners for over a century.Onions roots are shallow and not very efficient at taking up moisture, so they need a steady supply of water to grow without interruption.Although they actually recover well from drought and start growing again when watered, it is best to keep the soil consistently moist until the bulbs enlarge.Plant the largest ones together only 2 inches apart to start enjoying as green onions in just two or three weeks.Finally, weak plants that slowly wilt may be infested with onion root maggots, the larvae of a common fly.They are ready to harvest when the bulbs are big and the tops begin to turn yellow and fall over.Any warm, airy location is a good place to do this; you can even sling them over a fence as long as they aren't rained upon.Very sweet, juicy onions may be stored, wrapped in newspaper or paper towels, in the fridge