“I get to thinking, back in the day, these men dug it all by what we call pico y pala — pickaxe and shovel,” Martinez, 76, told me when I visited recently.But in a region where some water rights have been sold to the highest bidder and private gain is sometimes prioritized over collective well-being, acequias remain a powerful antidote to the forces threatening rural communities — a way of valuing local resources beyond their dollar amount and a catalyst for sharing them in times of scarcity.During dry years, acequias work to ensure that everyone weathers the shortages equitably; occasionally, Jose has opted to forego his water entirely when he sees no prospect of a decent crop, so that other parciantes can have more.THAT COMMUNAL MINDSET originates in part from the families who arrived in the southern San Luis Valley in the mid 19th century to settle the one-million-acre Sangre de Cristo Land Grant.The land grant was eventually sold, but its subsequent owners honored the historical rights of local families to access La Sierra.Growing up, Jose Martinez remembers how families built cellars to store the vegetables grown on the land nourished by the acequias, as well as meat from deer and elk hunted in La Sierra — food that would last them the winter.That all changed in 1960, when John Taylor, a North Carolina timber baron, bought 77,500 acres of La Sierra, renaming it the Cielo Vista Ranch and closing it off to the local community to create a logging operation.Poorly constructed roads created erosion, reducing the amount of water that flowed from the mountains into the acequias, according to area residents.The ensuing legal battle lasted 40 years, fought by generations of the same families and leading to an April 2003 Colorado Supreme Court ruling, Lobato v. Taylor.Every spring, acequia communities gather for an annual ritual called La Limpieza to clean the ditch in preparation for the irrigation season.Harrison’s ranch hands have intimidated and harassed local people who tried to access the property, according to court filings and residents — despite the legal rulings affirming the rights of the land grant heirs.With the threat of a violent confrontation growing, Jose and Junita’s children told their father they don’t want him going up onto the ranch alone to collect firewood, which he, like many locals, uses to heat their home.In an email, Harrison, through his lawyer, wrote that he believes that a few “bad apples” have abused those rights on occasion, illegally hunting, joy-riding ATVs and sneaking onto the property to fish.“Some of those places look like ghost towns because of that,” said Peter Nichols, a lawyer with the Acequia Project, a pro-bono legal assistance program supported by the University of Colorado Boulder Law School.“It’s messy because there are human relationships involved, and anytime you have a community that goes back multiple generations, there are going to be grudges and things that have happened that they’re going to bring into those situations,” Parmar said.Jose began growing alfalfa on his family’s eight acres again, and a few years ago, two of the girls bought the lots on either side of their parents, where they hope to one day build their own homes.

.

Gardening

Flower-sprinkled salads can keep the summery months going as we head into fall, and when winter rolls around, cultivate those blossoms for some steamy infused teas! .

Heart J Learning Center offers offsite workshop for home vegetable

On April 18, Heart J Center for Experiential Learning will partner with Sunspot Urban Farms, in Fort Collins, to offer a workshop for local home gardeners interested in increasing their yield and decreasing their stress by recruiting their best ally — Mother Nature.“Get The Most from your Summer Garden: Working with Nature for a Happy, Productive Season” is Heart J’s first offsite offering, to be held at Sunspot Urban Farm’s location just north of the Colorado State University campus.The all-day workshop will teach techniques for improving soil health for better nutrient content while discouraging pests and disease; composting, raised beds, successional planting, season extension, espalier orcharding, drip irrigation, seedling starts, transplanting, scheduling and foliar sprays. .

Vegetable

Edible plant or part of a plant, involved in cooking.Vegetables are parts of plants that are consumed by humans or other animals as food.The original meaning is still commonly used and is applied to plants collectively to refer to all edible plant matter, including the flowers, fruits, stems, leaves, roots, and seeds.Depending on the type of vegetable concerned, harvesting the crop is followed by grading, storing, processing, and marketing.Vegetables can be eaten either raw or cooked and play an important role in human nutrition, being mostly low in fat and carbohydrates, but high in vitamins, minerals and dietary fiber.The meaning of "vegetable" as a "plant grown for food" was not established until the 18th century.[3] In 1767, the word was specifically used to mean a "plant cultivated for food, an edible herb or root".As an adjective, the word vegetable is used in scientific and technical contexts with a different and much broader meaning, namely of "related to plants" in general, edible or not—as in vegetable matter, vegetable kingdom, vegetable origin, etc.The exact definition of "vegetable" may vary simply because of the many parts of a plant consumed as food worldwide—roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits, and seeds.[5] A more precise definition is "any plant part consumed for food that is not a fruit or seed, but including mature fruits that are eaten as part of a main meal"."Fruit" has a precise botanical meaning, being a part that developed from the ovary of a flowering plant.The question of whether the tomato is a fruit or a vegetable found its way into the United States Supreme Court in 1893.Throughout recorded history, the rich have been able to afford a varied diet including meat, vegetables and fruit, but for poor people, meat was a luxury and the food they ate was very dull, typically comprising mainly some staple product made from rice, rye, barley, wheat, millet or maize.The addition of vegetable matter provided some variety to the diet.The vegetables grown included onions, garlic, cabbages, melons, and lentils.[15] In Ancient Rome, a thick porridge was made of emmer wheat or beans, accompanied by green vegetables but little meat, and fish was not esteemed.a b c d Sum of production of dry and green vegetables.The USDA Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends consuming five to nine servings of fruit and vegetables daily.Japan, for example, recommends the consumption of five to six servings of vegetables daily.[31] In India, the daily recommendation for adults is 275 grams (9.7 oz) of vegetables per day.Production.Cultivation.Vegetables have been part of the human diet from time immemorial.Whatever system is used for growing crops, cultivation follows a similar pattern; preparation of the soil by loosening it, removing or burying weeds, and adding organic manures or fertilisers; sowing seeds or planting young plants; tending the crop while it grows to reduce weed competition, control pests, and provide sufficient water; harvesting the crop when it is ready; sorting, storing, and marketing the crop or eating it fresh from the ground.Harvesting.Harvesting beetroot in the United Kingdom.Harvesting root vegetables when they are fully mature improves their storage life, but alternatively, these root crops can be left in the ground and harvested over an extended period.Before marketing or storage, grading needs to be done to remove damaged goods and select produce according to its quality, size, ripeness, and color.Storage.A large proportion of vegetables and perishable foods are lost after harvest during the storage period.Storage can be short-term or long-term.If refrigerated storage is not available, the priority for most crops is to store high-quality produce, to maintain a high humidity level, and to keep the produce in the shade.The objective of preserving vegetables is to extend their availability for consumption or marketing purposes.The aim is to harvest the food at its maximum state of palatability and nutritional value, and preserve these qualities for an extended period.[39] Canning and freezing are the most commonly used techniques, and vegetables preserved by these methods are generally similar in nutritional value to comparable fresh products with regards to carotenoids, vitamin E, minerals.Canning is a process during which the enzymes in vegetables are deactivated and the micro-organisms present killed by heat.Freezing vegetables and maintaining their temperature at below −10 °C (14 °F) will prevent their spoilage for a short period, whereas a temperature of −18 °C (0 °F) is required for longer-term storage.[35] The dried produce must be prevented from reabsorbing moisture during storage.High levels of both sugar and salt can preserve food by preventing micro-organisms from growing.India, the United States, Turkey, Iran, and Egypt were the next largest producers.(890 lb/acre) Production. .

G H V

Leave a reply

your email address will not be published. required fields are marked *

Name *
Email *
Website