Which Succulents Are Best For Indoors

Which Succulents Are Best For Indoors

Although long rumored to be “foolproof” and easy to care for, in reality, no two succulents are alike, and each comes with its own unique needs.As desert natives, they’re accustomed to harsh conditions, capable of surviving both lengthy droughts and extreme temperatures better than many of their plant peers

How To Plant Succulents In A Garden Bed

How To Plant Succulents In A Garden Bed

Succulents are fun and hardy plants that don’t require a lot of maintenance or water.Wondering how to a make a succulent garden bed to add a little low maintenance life to your front yard?Succulents are so easy to plant and grow, so they are the perfect solution for someone that doesn’t necessarily have a “green thumb”.Last week I shared with you about how we completely transformed our flower bed with dark mulch.I mentioned that I would tell you how we transformed that little circular flower raised bed with rocks on the side of this picture.And I thought it would make a perfect little succulent garden bed, don’t you think?As I explained last week, we are only called a desert in relation to the amount of rain that falls in Portland.Succulents don’t do well in the snow (or any excess moisture really), but they are great for the summer here and I love them so I decided to give them a try.(UPDATE: 2 years since I wrote this post, the chicks and hens are still going strong, but the other succulents all died during winter.The chicks and hens just made it through the most brutal winter we’ve had in 30 years, so they are definitely hardy succulents!).You would also love this succulent wall art I made for our modern master bathroom.This how to make a succulent garden bed tutorial contains affiliate links, but nothing that I wouldn’t wholeheartedly recommend anyway!When I removed the succulents from their plastic pots I opened up the roots a little with my hand and then just planted like normal

How To Start A Succulent Garden Outdoors

How To Start A Succulent Garden Outdoors

With the exception of a few extra-hardy varieties-such as hens and chicks, which go dormant in freezing temperatures-outdoor succulents will die once cold weather moves in.Unless you live in the warmest parts of the country, you'll want to plant your outdoor succulents in pots that can be moved inside once the mercury drops."If you live in an area where it rains frequently, such as Portland, or if it's an unusually wet season, planters allow you to bring your succulents inside to keep dry.".Even in sunny Southern California, where conditions are ideal for succulents, Hugo finds planters helpful.For all the advantages of pots, if you live in a perennially warm climate, consider planting some of your succulents in your garden bed.As desert natives, they tolerate weather extremes better than most plants, and are an easy way to cut down on wasteful water usage.These white, wingless insects are found in warmer climates and greenhouses, where they enjoy snacking on juicy plants-and there's no juicer plant than a succulent.If you observe mealybugs on your outdoor succulent, Hugo recommends removing the infested leaf or branch.Those that live exclusively indoors can occupy almost any type of vessel, from teapots to terrariums, provided the amount of water is carefully regulated.If you live in a cooler climate, your potted succulents will have to come indoors before your area experiences the first frost of the season

How Often Should I Water Newly Planted Succulents

How Often Should I Water Newly Planted Succulents

To help you even further, download my free cheat sheet to see what it looks like when your succulents need more or less water.There are a lot of different ways to use the app, but keeping track of watering has been a gamechanger for my succulents!And make sure the succulents are in a well draining soil in a pot with a drainage hole (more on that in a minute).Use a small spout watering can (this one is fantastic) or a squeeze bottle (like the one in this super handy tool kit).This isn’t as much of an issue for outdoor succulents because there is more airflow and the water will dry out quicker.I can't tell you how many times I “think” I haven't watered in a while, only to find out, thanks to my notes in the Succulent Tracker app (Apple | Android) that it was just a few days ago.Succulents are generally native to areas where the soil drains quickly and water is heavy, but infrequent.While your succulents, especially indoors, don’t need a watering schedule this extreme, they will benefit from the “soak and dry” approach.The soak and dry method helps the succulent develop a large, healthy root system which will enable it to withstand longer periods of drought than most other plants.At the very beginning of the article I mentioned your succulents should be planted in a well draining soil AND in a pot with a drainage hole.I’ve dedicated a full post just to talking about the perfect soil mix for succulents.⅔ of the soil should be inorganic (rock) and ⅓ should be organic (pine bark, coconut coir, etc.I don’t generally recommend using most of the “Cactus and Succulent” soils found at most nurseries either.Remember how I mentioned succulents don’t like to sit in wet soil for very long?It’s very difficult for the soil to dry out completely if your pot doesn’t have a drainage hole.It also provides another way for air to flow through the soil and help it dry out faster.Pin Pot from Susan Aach | Drainage holes covered with mesh tape.If you want to know how to keep succulents alive in a pot without a drainage hole, click here and I’ll show you what to do.However, even still… I recommend using a squeeze bottle (like the one in my favorite tool kit) to ensure the soil gets thoroughly wet.You want to keep the soil damp (though not sopping wet) so the leaves have plenty of access to water.Checking the Succulent Tracker app (Apple | Android) reassures me it's time to water

How To Make A Succulent Garden

How To Make A Succulent Garden

These water-storing plants offer your landscape some of the most diverse textures and colors found in nature, and you hardly need to lift a finger to help them grow.After you wipe your hands of the dirt, you needn’t worry about providing constant plant care.They grow in various shapes, sizes, and colors, and often have beautiful spirals, frills, and rosette patterns.Most succulent plants tend to prefer mild climates, where the temperature doesn’t get too hot or too cold.If you live in an area with frigid winters, you may wish to grow your succulents in a container garden so you can bring them inside as house plants.Sempervivums, such as hens and chicks, and sedums are very cold-hardy ground covers and needn’t be brought inside for winter.Once you know the area’s size and the amount of sunlight it will receive, you’ll have a better idea which succulents will grow best in the space and how many to buy.Poor drainage will force these plants to sit in moist, wet soil for too long and cause root rot.Creating a soil mix with good drainage may take trial and error, and you may need to perform a few percolation tests.A good soil mix should include organic matter, such as compost, and coarse drainage material, like sand, grit, pumice, perlite, small gravel, or crushed granite.If a few roots tear or a plant gets bumped around a bit, succulents typically recover well and settle into their new home in no time.Sometimes the nursery potting mix doesn’t allow good drainage, and the soil may cling to the roots and prevent them from getting the water they need.Wait a day or two before watering your succulent garden, as the roots need time to heal and adjust.Keeping your plants in moist soil makes them susceptible to root rot.The Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of California recommends performing a spot treatment with isopropyl alcohol.Succulents are hardy plants and can bounce back quickly from an upset if given proper care.Carefully move your plant to a different area in the garden with well-drained soil or into a new succulent container with drainage holes.If your succulent begins to develop white, brown, black, or beige patches across the leaf, it may be sunburned.Call a landscaping professional if you need help installing, designing, or draining the soil in your garden.You don’t have to have a green thumb to grow a succulent garden –– hire someone to get in the dirt for you.And if you need assistance with routine maintenance, such as succulent care, watering, or seasonal gardening treatments, help is just one call away

How To Plant Succulents In Garden Bed

How To Plant Succulents In Garden Bed

Succulents are fun and hardy plants that don’t require a lot of maintenance or water.Wondering how to a make a succulent garden bed to add a little low maintenance life to your front yard?Succulents are so easy to plant and grow, so they are the perfect solution for someone that doesn’t necessarily have a “green thumb”.Last week I shared with you about how we completely transformed our flower bed with dark mulch.I mentioned that I would tell you how we transformed that little circular flower raised bed with rocks on the side of this picture.And I thought it would make a perfect little succulent garden bed, don’t you think?As I explained last week, we are only called a desert in relation to the amount of rain that falls in Portland.Succulents don’t do well in the snow (or any excess moisture really), but they are great for the summer here and I love them so I decided to give them a try.(UPDATE: 2 years since I wrote this post, the chicks and hens are still going strong, but the other succulents all died during winter.The chicks and hens just made it through the most brutal winter we’ve had in 30 years, so they are definitely hardy succulents!).You would also love this succulent wall art I made for our modern master bathroom.This how to make a succulent garden bed tutorial contains affiliate links, but nothing that I wouldn’t wholeheartedly recommend anyway!When I removed the succulents from their plastic pots I opened up the roots a little with my hand and then just planted like normal

How To Make A Succulent Potting Mix

How To Make A Succulent Potting Mix

Unlike your average indoor plant, succulents are somewhat choosy with their soil, making them unique.Whether you’re an old pro to succulents or the new kid on the succulent- block, getting the preliminaries right the first time will go a long way in your juicy adventures.Succulents, these cute, green, little aliens, don’t get along too well with the mundane, conventional gardening soil.Though succulents thrive with neglect, why do they demand a more thought-out soil type?The word succulent means a plant possessing thick, fleshy stems and leaves primarily as an adaptation to store water.In other words, succulents are desert- denizens that have recently been tamed to spice up the living room décor by using minimalistic planters and their unique but beautiful looks.Succulents store this water in their leaves and stem for use in the subsequent weeks before it rains again.So for succulents, their roots don’t take up water all the time as they already have enough tucked away in their leaves.The type of soil found in the desert is sandy, and the hot weather helps the water drain quickly.Creating the same condition for your succulent at home or office is critical.The biggest threat to succulent survival is root rot.(If you’ve been reading our recent articles, we mention this a lot because of how important it is).When making your succulent potting mix, you want to have soil that will drain well and quickly.Loose and grainy soil is the perfect substrate for growing succulents.Your succulent soil should be dry within 1 to 1.5 days of watering as a rule of thumb.If your succulent has filled out the pot, it can be hard to check soil dampness, and the mass of roots could use more room.Organic matter in this context means stuff that was once alive but is now dead.Compost Peat or sphagnum moss Manure Decomposing plants or animals Coconut coir Leaf or bark shreds.Soil is mainly made of varying clay, silt, and sand ratios.More organic matter means minor drainage (and wetter soil).The roots hate it because it retains moisture for long periods and makes it difficult for the plant to breathe.Soil containing too many nutrients, especially nitrogen, may lead to slight, brittle, and unpleasant plants.Succulent Soil Mix DIY – Easy Tutorials To Follow Anywhere, Anytime.Plus, it’s a lot cheaper than the regular commercial cacti mix sold in stores.A plethora of recipes for making succulent soil abound.However, we’ll stick with the basic procedure that is super effective and works wonders every time for this guide!The Ratio To Create Quality Potting Soil For Succulents.On the other hand, sand makes the potting mix less compact and increases drainage.As for the gardening soil, its primary role is to provide nutrients for the succulents.Start by slightly moistening the garden soil to prevent the dust from coming up the bucket or mixing container.If you ever find yourself where you don’t feel like mixing your own, there are lovely premixed soils you can always get as well.Tip: A neat trick before potting the succulents is to avoid getting the soil too moisturized.It’s pretty incredible how well-balanced it is – there’s just enough organic material to fertilize the plant and plenty of inorganic stuff to balance it out and have excellent drainage.Bonsai Jack Succulent and Cactus Gritty Mix is another fan favorite, but a little different.With this ebook, you’ll find more detailed answers to help your succulent grow better!

How To Create A Succulent Bowl

How To Create A Succulent Bowl

Because succulents hate wet soil look for a mix that incorporates perlite or sand to facilitate drainage

How To Grow A Vertical Succulent Garden

How To Grow A Vertical Succulent Garden

This ability to eke out a living in little soil makes them pretty good candidates for vertical gardening.I have settled on two types of containers for vertical gardening with succulents.Once you exceed that size, the frame becomes awkward and needs quite a bit of modification to prevent things like soil slump.These frames are low tech and do not incorporate watering systems, so they must be removed from the wall or hung on a hinge system to make it possible to flatten each frame for watering.The other system I use is a plastic panel 19.5”x19.5”x2.5”, specifically designed for vertical gardening.This is the high tech system, which is designed to accept drip and is scalable to whatever size is desirable.This frame anticipates some of the issues for vertical gardening on a large scale.The following is an attempt to describe each system and how to use them from planting to hanging and maintenance.The idea is to fill the frame with succulent mix through the wire mesh.Historically, I have worked with rosettes 90% of the time, throwing in a few sedums and crassulas here and there.Larger rosettes will reduce the number required, but remember the wire mesh is ½ inch in diameter, limiting the size of stem that will fit through the mesh.Cuttings are prepared by removing offsets, or stems, of plants like echeveria, sempervivum, sedum and crassula.The cuttings will need to heal, form a scab, for about one week before planting.Store the cuttings in a cool, shaded area in a single layer while healing.I like to work with different colors and textures and there are many options with these two families.Settle the soil by gently tapping the frame on the surface it is sitting on.I begin by placing the cuttings that I think of as the focal points of the planting.I decided after laying out all my plants to move these to a different location.Remember, the plants are a bit dehydrated at this point and will be even more so until they get their roots and begin to take up water.Some plants root more slowly, so checking a sample of different varieties is recommended.The frame does not have any drainage, so water enough to get the soil moist to the bottom, but not soggy.An overhang, lattice or patio cover, a nearby tree, or some other method of filtering the sun will make it easier to maintain the Living Picture.Too little sun will result in plants stretching for the light and losing their color.Maintenance might include pruning, thinning, or even removing unwanted plants.Again, refer to the Rudolf Schulz book, Care of Succulent Plants, for a more detailed description on maintenance.Also, because you are gardening in a very small space, it is best to fertilize minimally to slow the growth of the plants

What Plants Look Good With Succulents

What Plants Look Good With Succulents

Prized by gardeners for their architectural shapes, fascinating textures, vibrant colors, drought resistance and low maintenance, succulents are a joy to behold and a delight to design with.Well suited for climates with high temperatures and low rainfall, thanks to their ability to store water in their leaves or stems, most are easy to grow, with few disease or insect problems, and tolerant of heat and poor soils

How To Plant A Succulent Fairy Garden

How To Plant A Succulent Fairy Garden

Others set the scene for a toy castle with a mote filled with Sedum dasyphyllum and bordered by a forest of Crassula tetragona.They can be planted in the ground or in a pot and are perfect for people who don’t have a whole lot of space or mobility to enjoy landscaping on a smaller scale.As a general rule, succulents enjoy fast draining, mostly mineral soils with infrequent watering

What Is The Best Mulch To Use In Your Garden

What Is The Best Mulch To Use In Your Garden

On the flip side, it also retains heat on nights when the thermometer dips too low.And whether it is vegetable plants, flowers or shrubs and trees, keeping the soil from wild swings in temperature is important.Quick changes in soil temperature damages roots, and can easily injure or even kill plants.In flowerbeds, use it underneath a hardwood mulch to provide extra weed control.Shredded hardwoods do a nice job of adding back organic material to the soil as they break down.Not only are they safe to use around food producing plants, they also enrich your garden soil quickly.For mulching directly around plants, compost, shredded leaves, grass clippings or straw are all great options.They also break down quickly each season, adding back much-needed nutrients that vegetable plants take from the soil as they grow.Wood chips and bark products are great for walkways and paths in the garden, but avoid using them directly around vegetable plants.As noted above, mulching also helps regulate soil temperature and moisture levels too.Bark, larger-style wood chip products, and even stone or pebbles are great choices for these areas.They provide good insulation and weed suppression qualities, while breaking down slowly over time.If you use a stone-based product, it’s a good idea to first put down a breathable and permeable weed barrier

How Often Do You Water A Succulent Garden

How Often Do You Water A Succulent Garden

They come in a wide range of sizes, forms, colors and shapes making them appealing to almost everyone.This post (plus the video towards the end) serves as a guide and will give you things to think about when determining how to water your succulents, whether they’re planted in the ground, in pots or growing as houseplants.These are what I’m referring to in this post – the tapestry of “fleshies” planted in this bed at Barrel & Branches nursery in Encinitas, CA.Cacti like these Golden Barrels can handle the strong sun & crazy heat here in the Sonoran Desert.My first run in with a succulent was as a kid on our farmette in Litchfield County, CT

How To Best Plant Succulents

How To Best Plant Succulents

Plant a few succulents in a pot and see how it can transform a drab space in your home to one that looks modern and contemporary.If you’ve tried to grow succulents in the past but ended up killing them unintentionally, I think this post might help you figure out where you went wrong.If you’re growing your succulents indoors, I recommend purchasing a pot or planter that you’ll be able to stand to look at every day!Always remember that choosing a pot with a drainage hole is so important to the health of your succulents’ root system.A drainage hole allows excess water to drain from the pot so that the roots of your succulents don’t sit soggy soil.If succulents are allowed to sit in soggy soil, their roots will eventually rot, which will result in a dead plant.This soil will provide plenty of drainage and air circulation – something succulents need to thrive.If the leaves touch below the rim, simply add more soil to adjust the height.I know a lot of growers do strip the roots from their existing soil, but my plants fare better when I don’t do that.Mix and match your succulents while being mindful of color, texture, and height – it’s the best way to end up with an arrangement that looks appealing.Waiting a few days will give those roots time to heal or callus over before they’re able to soak up water that would cause them to start rotting.Plus, since succulents don’t mind dry soil, they’ll be fine with the wait.If you’re growing succulents outdoors and have planted them directly in the ground, then it’s okay to get the leaves wet since the sun will evaporate the water quickly.In container gardening, many people like to follow the thriller, filler, spiller rule if they’re looking to make an arrangement that looks beautiful from all angles.I consider the panda plant to be the thriller in the arrangement below, since it’s taller than the rest and features an interesting texture.I took small cuttings from my other arrangements to cover the tiny spots in the pot that needed to be filled.Spiller refers to any plant that grows downward in a cascading style so that it spills over the edge of the pot.For this, I actually chose two succulents that stretched out and drooped downwards over time due to lack of adequate sunlight.I didn’t want to just discard the succulent so I decided to take advantage of its new droopy shape and work it into this arrangement as a spiller!FYI the most popular succulent spiller is called Mother of Pearls, which I’m sure you’ve seen in many arrangements.As long as you give your succulents access to sunlight, they won’t stretch out and become leggy versions of their former, compact selves.To avoid etiolation (the process of plants stretching out) be sure to set the pot down in a sunny area of your home.You should be gentle when handling your plants, but you should also know that these hardy creatures can take a move or two and they’ll b just fine!

How To Succulent Garden

How To Succulent Garden

They look lovely lining a window sill or as a centerpiece for a breakfast table or in a container in a corner of the garden.Succulents, which are related to cacti (thorns are the main way to tell the cousins apart), originally came from a dry, desert environment, so transplanting them to the South can prove to be a challenge.While they are frequently touted as nearly-indestructible, if you're still working on your gardening merit badge, so to speak, succulents can require some special attention—not too much sun, not too much water, not too much soil.They also note that mixing indoor and outdoor varieties can spell disaster as they have different needs.Mother Nature Network suggests choosing succulents for the landscape based on their hardiness for your USDA zone

How To Keep Weeds Out Of Your Garden

How To Keep Weeds Out Of Your Garden

In fact, some of the most time-consuming chores that gardeners have been led to believe help with eliminating weeds are actually the main culprit in creating more!Many visitors to the farm are surprised we spend an extremely small portion of our time keeping the 40 x 60 vegetable garden weed free.Here is a look at 5 simple tips and secrets that can set your garden on the path to a weed free existence.And create a happier gardener all spring, summer and fall long!This is the biggest time saving and weed free garden tip ever!When you till your garden, all of the weed seeds that have been laying dormant on top become “planted” into the soil below.With every turn of the blades, weed seeds are finding a home underneath the soil.And if you happen to till your soil when it’s too wet, and you’ll be left with an almost unworkable garden.Mulching your garden with grass clippings, straw or shredded leaves not only helps to stop weeds, but adds vital nutrients to your soil in the process.When the soil is left exposed, weed seeds can easily find a path to germinate and grow.And as you will see below, there are a lot of simple ways to keep your soil from being bare with mulch the whole year round!Keeping weeds out of the walking and growing rows is just as important to the health of your garden as it is the look.We use a combination of mulches in our garden space to keep it covered and weed free.It starts with a heavy 4 to 6″ layer of hardwood bark mulch in our walking rows.The hardwood mulch keeps the walking rows clear and weed free year round.If needed, we then place a bit more mulch on top of the area for a thicker covering.Straw, grass clippings and shredded leaves are all excellent garden mulches.#5 ) Plant A Fall Cover Crop When Your Garden Is Done – How To Eliminate Weeds.Cover crops really help eliminate weeds over time by protecting bare soil over the late fall, winter and early spring months.You can sign up for our free email list in the subscribe now box in the middle of this article

What Succulents Are Good For Outdoors

What Succulents Are Good For Outdoors

It seems like everyone has developed a thirst for succulents—those plants with exotic shapes and diverse forms that are easy to maintain and create a bold statement wherever they grow.In regions that have been affected by drought or practice water-wise landscaping, succulents are a gorgeous and simple addition to the garden.They also thrive on patios, decks, and balconies, and make smart choices for pool area landscaping.If you aren't sure, buy from local suppliers: nurseries, succulent plant groups, botanical gardens, etc

How Succulent Garden

How Succulent Garden

They look lovely lining a window sill or as a centerpiece for a breakfast table or in a container in a corner of the garden.Succulents, which are related to cacti (thorns are the main way to tell the cousins apart), originally came from a dry, desert environment, so transplanting them to the South can prove to be a challenge.While they are frequently touted as nearly-indestructible, if you're still working on your gardening merit badge, so to speak, succulents can require some special attention—not too much sun, not too much water, not too much soil.They also note that mixing indoor and outdoor varieties can spell disaster as they have different needs.Mother Nature Network suggests choosing succulents for the landscape based on their hardiness for your USDA zone

How To Plant Vertical Succulent Garden

How To Plant Vertical Succulent Garden

This ability to eke out a living in little soil makes them pretty good candidates for vertical gardening.I have settled on two types of containers for vertical gardening with succulents.Once you exceed that size, the frame becomes awkward and needs quite a bit of modification to prevent things like soil slump.These frames are low tech and do not incorporate watering systems, so they must be removed from the wall or hung on a hinge system to make it possible to flatten each frame for watering.The other system I use is a plastic panel 19.5”x19.5”x2.5”, specifically designed for vertical gardening.This is the high tech system, which is designed to accept drip and is scalable to whatever size is desirable.This frame anticipates some of the issues for vertical gardening on a large scale.The following is an attempt to describe each system and how to use them from planting to hanging and maintenance.The idea is to fill the frame with succulent mix through the wire mesh.Historically, I have worked with rosettes 90% of the time, throwing in a few sedums and crassulas here and there.Larger rosettes will reduce the number required, but remember the wire mesh is ½ inch in diameter, limiting the size of stem that will fit through the mesh.Cuttings are prepared by removing offsets, or stems, of plants like echeveria, sempervivum, sedum and crassula.The cuttings will need to heal, form a scab, for about one week before planting.Store the cuttings in a cool, shaded area in a single layer while healing.I like to work with different colors and textures and there are many options with these two families.Settle the soil by gently tapping the frame on the surface it is sitting on.I begin by placing the cuttings that I think of as the focal points of the planting.I decided after laying out all my plants to move these to a different location.Remember, the plants are a bit dehydrated at this point and will be even more so until they get their roots and begin to take up water.Some plants root more slowly, so checking a sample of different varieties is recommended.The frame does not have any drainage, so water enough to get the soil moist to the bottom, but not soggy.An overhang, lattice or patio cover, a nearby tree, or some other method of filtering the sun will make it easier to maintain the Living Picture.Too little sun will result in plants stretching for the light and losing their color.Maintenance might include pruning, thinning, or even removing unwanted plants.Again, refer to the Rudolf Schulz book, Care of Succulent Plants, for a more detailed description on maintenance.Also, because you are gardening in a very small space, it is best to fertilize minimally to slow the growth of the plants

How To Start Succulent Garden

How To Start Succulent Garden

By recreating growing conditions similar to their native habitats, your succulents will flourish and even propagate on their own with minimal interference.Here are eight tips from expert Tom Jesch at Waterwise Botanicals for getting your succulent garden off to a good start.Sempervivum, a type of succulent that tolerates below zero temperatures, is planted densely in a repurposed tree stump.Jesch recommends planting hens and chicks Echeveria ‘Sahara’, Agave ‘Moonshine’, Crassula ‘Ripple Jade’ and Crassula ‘Hobbit Jade’, many types of Elephant’s Food (Portulacaria afra), and Aeonium ‘Plum Petals’.When growing succulents indoors, place them by a window or in a garden room where full sun is available for at least two or three hours a day.Contrary to common belief, you won’t kill your succulents by watering them regularly, especially during the active growing season.“Depending on weather, time of year, pot size, and soil conditions in the garden, this can be as often as every several days to as little as every two to three weeks during cool or low-light seasons.Other nonorganic materials that will help to loosen the soil include perlite, small gravel, crushed granite, or Turface (a calcined clay product).Leaving this air gap allows the soil to slowly work its way back in around the roots at the same growth rate as the plant.Most succulents don’t like a lot of organic material mixed or tilled into the soil near their roots because it can retain too much moisture.Taper down or pull away a bit so it’s not sitting on or collaring the plant up close and deep,” Jesch advises.If you can’t grow succulents outdoors year-round, the best solution is to plant them in pots or other containers, so you can easily move them indoors or to a sheltered area when weather conditions change.You can improve the drainage of an ordinary potting soil mix by amending it with coarse sand or gravel.“It’s also important to have enough drainage holes in the container to allow the water to drain through, wash out salts, and exchange oxygen,” he says.Removing the shriveled foliage will not only improve the appearance of your plants, it will also encourage new growth and promote air circulation.All succulents and cacti need regular fertilizing because they don’t have extensive, deep root systems to seek out nutrient sources.“Without adequate fertilizer, succulents will yellow, stop growing, and lose their beautiful luster and foliage colors that we love them for,” says Jesch.He recommends applying an all-purpose 15-15-15 fertilizer within a couple of weeks after planting succulents in the garden and then reapplying two or three times a year.Use plants of different colors and shapes as your embroidery materials, interweaving them to produce a living work of art.As an alternative to a traditional rock garden, grow succulents in crevices in natural stone or stone-look containers so they appear to be emerging from a rocky outcropping

How To Prepare Garden Bed For Succulents

How To Prepare Garden Bed For Succulents

Succulents are fun and hardy plants that don’t require a lot of maintenance or water.Wondering how to a make a succulent garden bed to add a little low maintenance life to your front yard?Succulents are so easy to plant and grow, so they are the perfect solution for someone that doesn’t necessarily have a “green thumb”.Last week I shared with you about how we completely transformed our flower bed with dark mulch.I mentioned that I would tell you how we transformed that little circular flower raised bed with rocks on the side of this picture.And I thought it would make a perfect little succulent garden bed, don’t you think?As I explained last week, we are only called a desert in relation to the amount of rain that falls in Portland.Succulents don’t do well in the snow (or any excess moisture really), but they are great for the summer here and I love them so I decided to give them a try.(UPDATE: 2 years since I wrote this post, the chicks and hens are still going strong, but the other succulents all died during winter.The chicks and hens just made it through the most brutal winter we’ve had in 30 years, so they are definitely hardy succulents!).You would also love this succulent wall art I made for our modern master bathroom.This how to make a succulent garden bed tutorial contains affiliate links, but nothing that I wouldn’t wholeheartedly recommend anyway!When I removed the succulents from their plastic pots I opened up the roots a little with my hand and then just planted like normal

How To Make A Succulent Garden In A Fountain

How To Make A Succulent Garden In A Fountain

I think it might be the architectural elements that I’m drawn to, or the beautiful rich colors, or the fact that each new variety I discover is just a little bit more awesome than the last.I’ve amassed quite the stockpile, so I decided to put them to good use and create this twist on the traditional water fountain.Succulents are a timeless plant and I love that they have made such a strong comeback.Once filled, this fountain will be heavy and impossible to move so ensure that it will be stable.I only had two rather large succulents (1 gallon) so I strategically placed them opposite each other in the bottom bowl.Take the rest of your succulents and place them around the tiers, mixing in the different varieties and hues.If you live in an area that freezes, make sure that you take precautions and cover the fountain with a canvas or large sheet to protect from the frost.You can also add outdoor lights to help with adding a little heat to the area

How To Plant Hanging Succulents

How To Plant Hanging Succulents

The summers are hot, the sun is strong and the winter evenings can dip into the low 30’s so the fleshy succulents are a bit trickier to grow outdoors here.Cacti are much more practical and although I love them in the desert landscape, they just aren’t as user friendly in a small garden.The dark brown color didn’t float my boat so I decided to spray it purple.The planting medium I used is a combination of succulent and cactus mix with a 1/2″ of rich, local compost worked in.If I was still living on the coast of California I would have used all succulent and cactus mix with just a sprinkling of compost.Because I now live in the desert where summers are very hot, I used this combo because I want the mix to hold a bit more moisture but still drain very well.As wonderful as this plant is, just be forewarned that stems fall off and “pearls” scatter like crazy – use a tender touch!I only had a few String Of Bananas cuttings (I gave the mother plant away) so that’ll be the back of the pot until they grow in.I hung this trio of hanging succulents in my grapefruit tree and let them settle in for 3 days before giving a good, thorough watering

Why Is A Succulent Called A Succulent

Why Is A Succulent Called A Succulent

One common adaptation in many succulents is the timing of the opening of their stomata, which are small mouthlike structures on the surface of plant leaves and stems.As a result, the loss of water (transpiration) during the hot dry daytime hours is minimized and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) uptake occurs in the dark

How To Plant A Succulent In A Glass Bowl

How To Plant A Succulent In A Glass Bowl

By learning how to grow succulents in a bowl, you can bring a bit of nature indoors for the cooler months with a minimal amount of effort.Most plant pots have drainage holes, which allow excess water to drain out of the bottom.There are also tons of pretty glass bowls and ceramic candy dishes at the thrift store or even in the back of your kitchen cabinet.It’s usually easier to drill a hole in a container than it is to deal with the consequences of not having proper drainage.Succulents, however, have such low water requirements that you can get away with using a bowl IF you use high-quality potting soil and don’t over-water the plants.Concrete, unglazed pottery bowls, and terra cotta will allow a touch of water through the walls.Succulent bowl health issues are generally related to overwatering rather than underwatering.This article includes lots of tips for growing succulents in glass, but for even more information, the book Miniature Terrariums: Tiny Glass Container Gardens Using Easy-to-Grow Plants and Inexpensive Glassware is an excellent resource.Remember that you don’t have to saturate all the soil in the bowl when you water the plant.Succulents are very efficient at finding and using small amounts of water available in the soil around their roots.Pick the planted succulent glass bowl up a few days later and notice if it’s any lighter.Try to find succulents with different heights and textures to add interest to the bowl.Planting succulents in a glass bowl is totally possible…just be extra careful about not overwatering.Black sand is lower maintenance as it camouflages any soil that’s showing and rarely requires replacement.If you want to get fancy, or are already an avid succulent terrarium gardener, you’re welcome to add volcanic pebbles (the kind with air holes in them) or perlite to the bottom of the bowl to create a bit of drainage space.I’ve planted succulent bowls both with and without pebbles and charcoal on the bottom, and I haven’t seen a huge difference.The purpose of this sunken soil level is to allow for later placement of decorative sand, and to ensure there is still a bit of room left for watering the succulent.Gently pat down the potting soil to create a flat surface upon which to place the sand.Getting the edges level is important for glass succulent bowls so they look uniform when viewed from the side.Carefully drip filtered water down any leaves that are dusty as a result of planting the succulents.As an optional bonus, decorate the sand surface with a few rocks, small pieces of driftwood, or even figurines.On the other end of the scale, if you forget about your DIY succulent terrarium and the leaves start to dry and shrivel, the plants can usually be brought back from the edge with some careful light watering.If you know the outdoor climate that the plant will survive in, that can also give you some clues about how tough it will be in different growing environments.Place your succulent bowl somewhere it will get 6-8 hours of sun each day, preferably in the morning.Some hardy succulents will tolerate limited below-freezing weather, but most of the varieties available year-round at the hardware store will not.To feed my succulents, I soak a bit of homemade organic compost or store-bought worm castings in filtered water for 2 days, stirring regularly.One more note about mimicking the natural environment is not to put your succulent in a closed terrarium or under a glass container.Imagine the cool evening breeze in the desert blowing over wild succulents…don’t trap them in an enclosed environment