Raised Vegetable Garden Beds On A Slope

Raised Vegetable Garden Beds On A Slope

We needed to terrace the ground into level ‘steppes’ or build raised beds for the garden vegetable plots in order to keep the valuable soil and amendments in place.So some of the bed sides need to be tapered to fit the ground contour, which makes the carpentry a bit more complex

How To Make A Raised Garden Bed Against A Fence

How To Make A Raised Garden Bed Against A Fence

I put on my big girl boots and began digging seven holes, two feet deep, to set the posts for the back of my garden bed wall.I took my time, but no matter what, I ended up with sore muscles every time I worked on this project.Gravel was added at the bottom and all around the 4 x 4 posts, making sure the post was level.A long piece of wood was the good'ol tool to compact that gravel.The next step, installing the boards, was much easier.Starting at the lowest part and working one layer at a time until reaching a full contiguous line.The posts were trimmed to size using a reciprocating saw.Before finishing the retaining wall, I went ahead and filled the area with a good amount of soil.And well, this picture above is how the garden bed looked during Spring this year.The trampoline was removed and grass seeds were planted.:)I'm so glad to finally get to see the fruits of all that hard work!For more DIY - Backyard projects check these out:

Raised Garden Beds Las Vegas

Raised Garden Beds Las Vegas

Patio Raised Garden Bed w/Posts or Wheels.Great for Concrete Patios in homes or apartments.Custom Built Cedar & Redwood Raised Garden Beds & Planters.At MYVEGBED We offer Custom hand crafted natural wood "Ground Garden Beds" and "Patio Garden Beds", all hand made to your custom order, specifics, and growing needs.All you have to do is add soil and start growing!Live in a condo or apartment and just have a concrete patio and would love to have your own garden?With MYVEGBED, We create your instant Garden Space.Choose your shape and size that fits your home or yard specifics.Choose between Cedar or Redwood Beds for high durability, longevity, and beauty!Click here for further details All our Garden Beds arrive fully built and ready to plant!All other pricing, call for a custom quote.Raised Planting Stations are your personal backyard garden work station.Your raised planting bed is designed as your planting workstation which is conveniently designed at waist level as to ease your back from any strenuous bending during planting and re-transplanting any mobile plant projects you may have.Planting Stations & Raised Planters ​.I’m so happy with the quality and craftsmanship

Do Raised Beds Need A Liner

Do Raised Beds Need A Liner

A liner for your raised garden bed can insulate the soil against extreme temperatures, keep moles and gophers out, and prevent weeds from growing.A raised bed liner will also allow water to drain away without taking soil with it.We’ll also look into the different materials you can use for raised bed liners, along with pros and cons of each.After weighing the pros and cons, I think that lining your raised garden bed is worthwhile.There are pros and cons to lining a raised garden bed – sometimes it depends on what you are growing.Let’s review the pros and cons of lining your raised garden bed, so that you can make an informed decision on your own.If you build your raised bed out of pressure treated wood or railroad ties, a liner can also prevent harmful chemicals from leaching into the soil.Add a liner to a raised bed to prevent extreme temperature changes during the day or night.A plant bed liner helps to retain heat from daytime sun in the soil.This will prevent damage to plant roots from nighttime cold or late spring frosts.Likewise, a liner will help to prevent the soil in your elevated garden bed from heating up too fast on a hot, sunny day.If you line the bottom and sides of your raised bed properly, moles and gophers will not be able to dig their way through it.Raised Bed Liners Retain Soil While Allowing Water To Drain Away.Over time, this will lead to a lack of organic material and nutrients for the plants in your raised bed.Installing the proper liner for your raised bed will allow water to drain away without taking soil with it.A liner made of cloth or other water-permeable materials will allow your raised bed to drain without losing all of its nutrients over time.This won’t be a problem if you built your raised bed from untreated wood, brick, or stone.If you are also worried about water drainage, try using cloth or some other water-permeable material for the bottom of your raised bed, and use plastic for the sides.If drainage for your raised garden bed is important, then you might want to avoid a plastic liner.Eventually, wet soil will lead to root rot of the plants in your raised bed.If you are worried about this problem or live in an area that gets lots of rain, make sure to use a garden liner that is water-permeable (more on this later).However, thin plastic liners or old pool covers are pretty easy to cut with a trowel or shovel.Be careful when digging deep or around the edges in your raised garden bed, or you may damage the liner.Also, dig slowly near the edges of the raised bed to avoid ripping the liner.Removing and replacing soil to change old liners is a lot of work when you have multiple raised garden beds!For example, let’s say that your raised bed is made of untreated wood, and you think it will last 5 years before rotting away.If you use untreated wood to build your raised bed, it will rot faster when exposed to water.Untreated wood may rot even faster if a raised garden bed liner traps moisture.cardboard – for example, flattened boxes (this is one material that is cheap and plentiful – but it won’t last long!If you use it to line your raised beds, it will allow the soil to drain while also preventing weeds from growing.Landscape fabric is probably your best bet for a raised bed liner if you want to allow adequate drainage.Canvas is also used in gardening applications, such as grow bags or raised bed liners.Canvas is probably your best bet for a raised garden bed liner if you want to ensure good drainage and make it more difficult for gophers and moles to chew through.Since these plastics are waterproof, they will not allow good drainage if used to line the bottom of your raised bed.Your best bet is to use this type of plastic to line the sides of a raised bed made of older wood.You can use this strong material to line the bottom of your raised bed to prevent gophers and moles from digging in from below.For a nontoxic garden bed liner option, consider hardware cloth made from stainless steel that is not treated with any chemicals.A roll of hardware cloth or chicken wire can make a good water-permeable raised bed liner to keep moles and gophers out.Used together with canvas or landscape fabric, hardware cloth can help to prevent pests from digging into your garden while also allowing water to drain away without carrying soil with it.Hardware cloth is probably your best bet if you absolutely need to keep moles and gophers out of your raised bed while also allowing for adequate drainage.One non-toxic garden bed liner option is this weed barrier paper from the Old Farmer’s Almanac at SimplyGro.It is OMRI listed for organic use, prevents weeds for up to 90 days, and biodegrades to provide nutrients for your plants.Cardboard is cheap and plentiful, but it will not last long as a raised garden bed liner.Cardboard is probably your best bet for a raised garden bed liner if you want a cheap and biodegradable option

Raised Garden Bed For Plants

Raised Garden Bed For Plants

Soil that is raised off the ground can be controlled for quality, creating a warm, nutrient-rich, well-draining growing environment for optimal root development and plant growth

Best Metal Raised Garden Bed

Best Metal Raised Garden Bed

A Raised Bed Way Above the Pack.What's not to say about this raised bed?Because as I begun to research raised beds, Vego Garden kept popping up.It was built for its proper function and to last thus giving good value for money

How To Get Rid Of Grubs In A Raised Vegetable Garden

How To Get Rid Of Grubs In A Raised Vegetable Garden

Natural Ways to Get Rid of Grub Worms in Your Lawn Discover five natural methods for treating and controlling lawn grubs Share:.Grub worms damage your lawn by feeding on the roots, and eventually turn into adult beetles that eat the leaves of other prized plants in your garden.Many homeowners simply treat their lawn with a chemical grub control product, or grub killer, once or twice a year.Answer 1: Earth-friendly beneficial nematodes seek out and kill grubs and other soil-inhabiting insects.No more grubs!".Buy nematodes on Amazon.Answer 2: A naturally occurring pathogen, milky spore disease (Bacillus popilliae), affects beetle larvae and will kill grubs without harming you or your garden, but it can take one to three years to become fully effective.Since grubs are the larvae of the June beetle, we assume that the house wrens are eliminating the beetles.” Buy wren houses on Amazon.Answer 4: "I have been very successful controlling grubs by using only organic fertilizer once in the fall and once in late winter," says another reader.Grubs and Your Lawn.Damage to your lawn, especially dead patches of grass.The best time to treat your lawn for grubs is in the spring or fall when they are active and feeding

How To Make A Raised Garden Bed Plans

How To Make A Raised Garden Bed Plans

If any backyard furniture deserves an award for being highly utilitarian, the raised garden bed is a top contender!A raised garden bed provides drainage so your plants don’t get their feet wet.The enclosed space and elevated design makes your garden harder to reach for critters and pests.Whether you want to add an irrigation system, a place to sit and relax, decorative details to enhance your yard, or hardware cloth underneath the soil for better protection against pests, a raised bed can accommodate all of these and much, much more.This massive round-up of garden concepts and plans has something for everyone – from simple straightforward designs for the beginner to those that take lots of experience and offer a bit more challenge.Here’s my list of fifty different plans for you to choose from, organized in size order for ease of selection!This 2×2 garden bed suits flowers and herbs and can fit even in the tightest of backyards.If you fancy trying this DIY idea, know that you will need more than a dozen different tools and materials – from saws of different sizes, nail gun, sander, to kreg jigs and more.The latter helps children grow closer to nature, develop life-skills, and gain mental clarity.If your child is showing interest in plants and nature, this raised bed might just encourage him to take the plunge.It doesn’t take much to build – a free afternoon, basic carpentry skills, and supplies you can easily find.And with hooks on the side, you’ll also have a place for hanging your gardening tools.The guide doesn’t leave out any detail, and it also comes with a cut list you can print out.Materials Wood, deck posts, balusters, plastic utility tub Dimensions 3’ x 2’ x 3’ Difficulty Medium Cost $$.Do you love planting cool season vegetables like beets, broccoli, and cauliflower?This requires some woodworking skill, so try to get some practice with scrap wood so you don’t waste your pyramid supplies.Michelle loves deer and their cutesy faces – but not when they mow down everything in her yard, her veggies and herbs included!The quickest thing to do would be to call a grab hire company to come and collect your waste – but don’t do that just yet!Different herbs need varying amounts of space for optimal growth, and some can be quite invasive.Materials Chimney tiles, cinder blocks Dimensions 3’4” x 3’4” x 8-12” Difficulty Easy Cost $.It’s higher than your average raised beds, and it comes with benches where you can sit as you harvest, water, or plant in your garden.This raised bed idea can be the perfect gift for elderly gardeners or anyone looking for an attractive and stylish addition to their yard.So instead of shopping around for a garden bed, he built this two-tiered model that puts every inch of the space to good use.It adopts a square design, able to accommodate more plants than rectangular garden beds.You will love this elevated bed idea, especially if you’re living in an apartment, a condo, or anywhere with no space for an in-ground garden.But this garden bed is a nice addition on any patio or deck, especially when fresh and organic vegetables start growing from it.Each bed occupies a square foot, so just build more if you need a larger space for your veggies.Maureen Fitzgerald, a Wisconsin mommy, found a lovely VegTrug elevated garden bed while shopping one day.You can find the supplies you’ll need for this elevated garden bed at the local hardware store, and building this DIY project is as straightforward as it could get.Materials Pressure treated wood Dimensions 4’ x 4’ x 3’ Difficulty Easy Cost $$.The technique is a great way to build a small yet intensively planted garden.This guide walks you through everything you need to know to get started – from choosing the location, creating the right soil, to the simple finishing touches.This attractive raised bed leaves a lot of room at the bottom, so your veggies’ roots can grow freely and get a better grip on the soil.This raised bed can keep its soil in place and stand its ground when rowdy pets, kids, and other stuff bump into it.This decorative planter sports diamond patterns, which are optional but can help add more color and variety to your space.Do note, however, that this DIY project is a bit more advanced and requires more tools (and precaution) than your plain garden bed idea.This one uses cinder blocks instead of wood, eliminating the need to measure, cut, and work with power tools.All you need to do is find the right spot, level the ground, place the blocks, and you’re ready to grow your favorite veggies!The removable cover keeps the plants safe and sound from the elements, while allowing you to work on your garden without any hiccups.Materials Wood, PVC, wire mesh, garden cloth or plastic sheeting Dimensions Variable, but as shown, 4’ x 6’ x 1’ box, height varies Difficulty Medium Cost $$$.These 8-feet long raised beds can take shelter a variety of plants, keeping them protected from pests and invasive weeds.This garden bed uses corrugated metal and pressure treated wood.Materials Corrugated aluminum, wood Dimensions 4’ x 8’ x 2’3” Difficulty Medium Cost $$.But maybe tilling and removing sod and creating a mess in the process isn’t your cup of tea?It lifts your greens and keeps them away from pests on the ground, while the built-in self-watering system wicks water from the container and to the roots.Materials Wood, plastic bins, PVC Dimensions 5’3” x 2’3” x 3’ Difficulty Medium Cost $$-$$$.Rayan, the creator of this design, has a gripe with prefab planter kits all too common in stores.Materials Wood, requires specialized tools Dimensions 5’7” x 3’7” x 15” Difficulty Hard Cost $$$.Building a vegetable garden in raised beds can take up space, and it can consume most of your yard.Read the post, grab the essential tools and a few rot-resistant cedar boards, and you’re ready to build.It has a composting basket at its core and uses multiple layers to preserve moisture, resulting in a highly productive garden.And by using stone to build the keyhole/garden bed, plants are spared from the harsh heat of the sun and cold winter temperatures.This garden bed will require a lot of heavy lifting, but it’s worth every ounce of extra effort.In this guide, Ana White shows you how to create a cedar garden bed using fence pickets she found at a big box store.Materials Cedar fence boards Dimensions 6’2” x 1’7” x 1’ Difficulty Easy Cost $$.If you’re limited in terms of your garden space, or all you’ve got is an apartment balcony, this DIY project may be perfect for you.This raised planter uses scrap steel from a roof as a lining, with drainage holes drilled along the base, and heavy-duty wood for the framework.Sturdy and surprisingly spacious, its 2-foot planting depth means you can grow everything from carrots to cucumbers.Materials Wood, sheet steel (old roofing), landscaping fabric Dimensions 6.25’ x 2’ x 3’ Difficulty Easy-medium Cost $.Not because they can sleep in or go on a Netflix binge, but because they can create cool stuff like this planter box.The DIY project is the couple’s first attempt on growing a vegetable garden, and it’s a splendid start!Raised beds provide some degree of pest and animal control.Materials Wood, dowels, PVC, furring strips Dimensions 8’ x 2’ x 3’ Difficulty Easy-Medium Cost $.But a closer look reveals that this one is anything but ‘meh!’ Follow this step-by-step guide by Johanna Silver and learn how to build the ultimate garden bed.Materials Wood, PVC, rebar, floating row cover, hardware cloth mesh Dimensions 8’ x 4’ x 1’ Difficulty Medium Cost $$-$$$.Plain wooden boards and fence pickets are the go-to’s when building raised beds.Materials Landscaping timbers, stakes, rebar Dimensions 8’ x 4’ x 12” Difficulty Medium Cost $$.If you have the woodworking chops and the entire weekend to spare, pick up this project idea.It’s similar to the other garden enclosure, but this one takes detail and structural stability up a notch.Materials Lumber, chicken wire Dimensions 8’ x 8’ x 6’ Difficulty Hard Cost $$$.Mavis Butterfield was having serious dirt (and fence) withdrawals until the HH built her a handful of spacious raised garden bed.This raised bed is massive, so make sure you have enough space in your home before giving it a go.You’ll also need to set aside at least $500 and a whole lot of soil to fill the garden bed.The original project uses untreated pine, but you can opt for the tried-and-tested cedar instead to get more bang for your buck.Wooden railway sleepers pack a lot of utility even after retiring from the railroad.The number of ways one can repurpose these durable pieces of wood is only limited by the imagination.This idea turns railway sleepers into raised beds – and they come with benches, too!If you’re looking to create a home for your veggies and a place for rest on the yard, this project nails down both!Materials Railway sleepers, wood Dimensions 21’ x 8’ x 3’ Difficulty Hard Cost $$$$.But if building one for your garden isn’t suitable, this hooked raised bed idea might be just what you need.If you want to get an early start or extend the outdoor growing season by a few weeks, cold frames are a fine addition to this garden bed.This pallet planter is easy to build, and the post also includes a 3-minute video to show you how it’s done.Not only does it save you money, but giving old things a new lease on life brings a soothingly satisfying feeling, too.It uses some straight timber, smaller branches, and thicker logs you can easily find lying around.But the end result will be worth it: a raised garden bed that’s as natural as it can be.Materials Scrap lumber, old branches Dimensions Variable depending on what you need Difficulty Medium Cost $.These timber raised beds from the DIY Network don’t take much to build.Plus, it only takes a day to build so you will have an easy time fitting this project into your schedule.The guide uses thicker-than-usual timber and leaves you with some handy tips on setting up your raised beds for success.Materials Timbers Dimensions Variable by personal need Difficulty Easy-Medium Cost $$-$$$.Barns, buildings, and old fences, in particular, are excellent sources of free reclaimed wood.But even better, her garden bed design comes with a frame to offer support for vines.Flexible wooden branches are woven around stakes, creating a durable and all-natural border that you can easily shape and fill to make a raised bed.This guide teaches you how to bring this ancient fencing practice to your modern garden in 12 steps.Materials Willow branches or other flexible green wood Dimensions Variable – depends on need Difficulty Easy-Medium Cost $.All you need is landscaping fabric, scissors, soil, seedlings, and of course, milk crates which are generally easy to find.A high raised bed eliminates the need for stooping and bending over, a blessing for people with back aches.How are you going to fill a massive and deep raised garden bed with soil without spending a fortune?Read and download the plan to find out what they did instead of packing their beds with dirt.Materials Wood, milk crates, hardware cloth, landscaping fabric Dimensions Variable – build to suit Difficulty Easy Cost $-$$.If your backyard has more concrete than soil, why not design a garden bed to complement the current architecture?Materials Concrete blocks and toppers Dimensions Variable Difficulty Easy Cost $$

What Flowers To Plant In Raised Garden Bed

What Flowers To Plant In Raised Garden Bed

Flowers in the vegetable garden can reduce pest problems and improve biodiversity.However, I didn’t anticipate the power of bringing habitat for beneficial insects right into the places where I needed them.Beneficial braconid wasps covered the sweet alyssum and patrolled nearby crop plants.This integration increases the chance that beneficial insects will locate pests on your crops and keep things in balance.Here are some examples for a bed with the long side facing south (northern hemisphere):.To do this, plant tomatoes along the north side of the bed, with medium-height flowers in the middle, and a shorter crop, like carrots, in the southern-most row.Would you like to learn more about using flowers in the vegetable garden to improve biodiversity, reduce maintenance, and increase yield?Although there are quite a few flowers that can benefit the vegetable garden, the following are my favorites because they are annuals, which means that I can rearrange them every year to correspond with the crops I intend to grow.This annual herb with a cheerful, yellow, daisy-like flower can grow 18-24 inches tall.It exudes a sticky sap that traps pests like aphids and whiteflies, and keeps them off of nearby crops.It attracts many types of pollinators and beneficial insects like ladybugs, hoverflies, and green lacewings who enjoy not only the flower nectar, but also the buffet of their favorite pests.Calendula can even be grown like a cover crop over the winter to hold the soil in place.In the interim, I sowed California poppy in the empty spaces of the bed because it is quick to bloom.I was fascinated by the deep roots of this plant that mine the clay soil and soften it, as well as the bright yellow flowers that tell you when it’s going to rain by closing up.These cute-as-a-button dainty flowers with their lacy foliage attract pollinators and beneficial insects.Growing to about 12 inches, chamomile is a prairie plant that has deep roots which dredge up nutrients.As a member of the carrot family, its roots reach deep into the soil, loosening as it goes (nature’s free tilling service!).Also as a member of the carrot family, the flower and lacy foliage attract a wide number of beneficial insects.Although it’s a tall flower for the vegetable garden, I find that its upright growth habit allows sunlight to get through to shorter crops around it.Its dense, low growing habit (12-18 inches) makes it an excellent living mulch as it covers the soil underneath taller crops, and feeds the soil as it dies back.It is effective as a living mulch because its shallow roots hold the soil in place.For one thing, you can improve the ecology of your garden by leaving the roots of the flower plants intact.Cut them off at the base, rather than pulling up the spent plants, when you’re cleaning up at the end of the season

How To Keep Rabbits Out Of Your Raised Garden

How To Keep Rabbits Out Of Your Raised Garden

Seeing a rabbit hop through a garden, nibbling on crops is an adorable sight…unless that garden is your garden and that carrot is one you planted.Check your barriers often for holes or signs of nibbling.Expandable trunk protectors can help keep your trunks safe, but note—they may need to be adjusted for snow levels.In fact, as Theresa Rooney notes in The Guide to Humane Critter Control, young rabbits “will sample and eat many plants that their parents would not touch.Baby bunnies just aren’t smart enough, yet, to know which plants they should eat and which plants they should not.” Resolving your rabbit problem may be a matter of trial and error and switching things up—over time, rabbits can become accustomed to a plant’s smell, making that plant useless as a deterrent.See suggestions below for other plants rabbits dislike to find out what works for your garden.With that said, it’s important to note that if you do find a rabbit’s nest, don’t attempt to remove it.Ask your local groomer for dog and cat hair then stuff it into a burlap bag or pantyhose and place it around your garden so the scent tricks rabbits into thinking there’s a predator nearby.Create your own spray.There are lots of homemade spray recipes available online, and many of them include cayenne pepper, as rabbits dislike the pungent smell.Spray plants rabbits usually nibble on.Although it’s likely that your cat or dog will find the smell repelling, be sure to use your best judgement when it comes to whether you should spray this in your garden or not.You’ve spotted pea-sized droppings.Something has been gnawing on bark around tree trunks or woody plants.The Best Deer-Resistant Plants for Your Garden

Raised Vegetable Garden Beds Plans

Raised Vegetable Garden Beds Plans

The enclosed space and elevated design makes your garden harder to reach for critters and pests.2×2 Raised Planter.2×2 Raised Planter.Build This Raised Bed.On the other hand, it looks anything but typical and can make for a lovely (and affordable) addition to your backyard.Build This Raised Bed.This DIY project has just the right size for kids.Build This Raised Bed.If you are, then you’ll dig this herb planter.Build This Raised Bed.Multi-Level Garden Bed.Multi-Level Garden Bed.Not only does the planter’s height protect it from stray animals, but it also provides shade to cool season plants, while allowing summer plants on the upper level to bathe in the sun.Build This Raised Bed.This requires some woodworking skill, so try to get some practice with scrap wood so you don’t waste your pyramid supplies.Build This Raised Bed.This DIY tiered herb garden is perfect for Michelle’s plan.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.Two-Tiered Raised Bed.Two-Tiered Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.You can find the supplies you’ll need for this elevated garden bed at the local hardware store, and building this DIY project is as straightforward as it could get.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.This raised garden bed plan uses the square foot gardening technique.Build This Raised Bed.4×4 Raised Bed.4×4 Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.Do note, however, that this DIY project is a bit more advanced and requires more tools (and precaution) than your plain garden bed idea.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.This raised bed idea only cost Heather $35.Build This Raised Bed.Materials Wood, weed blocking material Dimensions 4’ x 8’ x 1’ Difficulty Easy Cost $$.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.You love the idea of gardening and eating what you grow.Build This Raised Bed.Materials Wood, requires specialized tools Dimensions 5’7” x 3’7” x 15” Difficulty Hard Cost $$$.Build This Raised Bed.Building a vegetable garden in raised beds can take up space, and it can consume most of your yard.Read the post, grab the essential tools and a few rot-resistant cedar boards, and you’re ready to build.Build This Raised Bed.Cap-Railing Raised Garden Beds.Cap-Railing Raised Garden Beds.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.Cedar Raised Garden Beds.Cedar Raised Garden Beds.Materials Cedar fence boards Dimensions 6’2” x 1’7” x 1’ Difficulty Easy Cost $$.Build This Raised Bed.Dog-Proof Raised Planter.Dog-Proof Raised Planter.Build This Raised Bed.The DIY project is the couple’s first attempt on growing a vegetable garden, and it’s a splendid start!Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.If you want to add a decorative touch to your garden (and have the space for it), consider adding these handsome 8-foot long garden beds to your project list.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.You will need a lot of supplies and tools to take on this project.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.This raised bed is massive, so make sure you have enough space in your home before giving it a go.You’ll also need to set aside at least $500 and a whole lot of soil to fill the garden bed.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.Materials Old tires, cutting tools Dimensions Depends on size of tire, generally 2-3’ round Difficulty Medium Cost $.Build This Raised Bed.U-Shaped Raised Bed.U-Shaped Raised Bed.But if building one for your garden isn’t suitable, this hooked raised bed idea might be just what you need.Build This Raised Bed.This pallet planter is easy to build, and the post also includes a 3-minute video to show you how it’s done.Build This Raised Bed.Repurposed Dresser Herb Garden.Repurposed Dresser Herb Garden.Materials Old dresser Dimensions Depends on size of dresser used Difficulty Easy Cost $.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.These timber raised beds from the DIY Network don’t take much to build.Plus, it only takes a day to build so you will have an easy time fitting this project into your schedule.Build This Raised Bed.Barns, buildings, and old fences, in particular, are excellent sources of free reclaimed wood.Build This Raised Bed.Materials Repurposed bed support Dimensions Variable – depends on bed Difficulty Easy Cost $.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed.These planters don’t even require you to build anything!Materials Milk crates, landscaping fabric Dimensions Variable depending on number of crates Difficulty Easy Cost $-$$.Build This Raised Bed.Materials Wood, milk crates, hardware cloth, landscaping fabric Dimensions Variable – build to suit Difficulty Easy Cost $-$$.Build This Raised Bed.Build This Raised Bed

Best Wood For Raised Bed Vegetable Gardens

Best Wood For Raised Bed Vegetable Gardens

If you are looking for designs, I have free plans for building raised garden beds here .You’ve got perfect soil, a level yard, consistent rainfall, and everything grows beautifully, right?Bad soil, a sloping yard, and tree roots are all reasons to grow in raised garden boxes.A raised growing space is also better for back and knee problems.Wood is a popular choice for building plant boxes because it’s fairly inexpensive, readily available, and lasts quite a few years.But you do have to choose carefully to avoid contaminating the soil and ensure your choice is eco-friendly source, affordable, and long-lasting.I currently use 1″ untreated pine boards because they are readily available in my area.The wood gets a lovely, rustic barn board patina after just one season.I also use some pressure-treated wood for various garden structures including large raised beds.This type of treated wood was banned years ago for household use.I admit the suggestions (below) are quite idealistic, but why not do what’s best for the health of your garden and the environment if you can?The best choice (and often the lowest cost) is locally-sourced wood coming from sustainably-managed tree farms (as opposed to decimating old-growth forest by clear-cutting).The FSC is an international, not for-profit organization that promotes the responsible management of forests.If you want to use treated lumber, do your homework first so you’re certain it’s safe for your food garden: not just fence posts and decks.I notice some manufacturers now specifically mention if they consider their treated wood safe for vegetable gardens.Read more: Staying Safe Around Treated Wood | Government of Canada.My current raised beds are made from 1″ untreated pine and last approximately 10 years.If your raised beds will be exposed to a lot of moisture, wood like pine may only last a few years.Concrete blocks are generally considered fine but always check what the product is made from to be sure.Also see DIY Raised Garden Bed With Built-In Privacy Wall.Design your raised bed based on available lumber sizes to minimize waste cuts.I like to use 8-foot lengths to create easy-to-assemble 4×8-foot boxes but also keep in mind what fits your body size for easy reaching.Free Plans for Building Raised Garden Beds.Tall raised beds hold a lot of soil and that can be expensive.Use these tips for alternate ways to fill a raised bed without spending a fortune

How To Build A Raised Garden Nz

How To Build A Raised Garden Nz

You may be asking “Why do farms till the soil anyway?” The answer is because tillage (i.e

How To Make A Raised Bed With Decking

How To Make A Raised Bed With Decking

Or perhaps you’re like us and have a good-sized yard, but want to maximize growing space by adding raised garden beds on your hardscape areas as well.Read along to learn tips and best practices for building a raised garden bed on concrete or other hard impervious surfaces.In this example, I’ll show you how we prepped a new wood raised garden bed to go on top of our asphalt driveway.Finally, we’ll also cover alternate options for putting planter boxes on hard surfaces – such as elevated raised beds and kits.Provide adequate drainage, bed depth, and high-quality soil for the plants to grow best.I don’t recommend placing the soil itself right on the concrete.Yet I don’t necessarily recommend adding a solid bottom on the bed either.Instead, we create a wire and fabric “basket” or bottom on our raised bed to both contain the soil but also promote drainage.Here is one alternate design that we’ll talk about near the end of the article: an elevated and mobile raised planting box.For example, if you’re hoping to add raised garden beds on top of a nice wood deck, the style of bed I’m going to show you in this article may not be the best choice – which sits right on the ground and drains from the bottom.Instead, you’d likely want to protect your deck by using an elevated raised bed kit, or one that has a solid bottom and contained drainage system.Here is the driveway space we will add a new raised bed to.Drainage & Water.All garden beds need good drainage, including raised garden beds installed on hard surfaces!That is, unless there are plenty of drainage holes, an internal drainage system, or it otherwise has the ability to freely drain excess moisture from the soil.On the other hand, I don’t necessarily suggest putting soil directly on top of concrete.Therefore, you may even find the need to water a garden bed on concrete more often than others, like most container gardening.The more space for roots, soil, and nutrients – the better!In contrast, putting a raised garden bed on concrete is essentially like creating a large pot or container.All that said, I suggest a minimum depth of 12 inches (preferably 18”) for any raised bed that will be put on a hard surface.The one you’ll see in this article example is 16-18 inches tall.When it comes to filling a garden bed on concrete, invest in high-quality soil and compost to help compensate for the shallower root space.I suggest using a combination of some potting soil, some general planting or raised bed mix, and plenty of compost.You don’t want all the water and nutrients to run right out of the bottom of the bed!Containing the Soil.It isn’t the best idea to add soil straight into a garden bed directly on top of concrete.Consequently, the best way we have found to contain the soil within a raised garden bed on top of concrete is to create a sturdy “basket” for the soil within the wood frame of the bed.Building a Wood Raised Garden Bed to Install on Concrete.First, you need to build (or otherwise obtain) a wood raised garden bed frame for your space.They will help support the weight of the soil on top of the fencing and landscape fabric we’re going to add next.Next, we are going to line the inside bottom of the raised bed frame with hardware cloth wire fencing material.Without hardware cloth, landscape fabric alone would easily rip under the weight of the soil.For this step, I highly suggest using hardware cloth over something like chicken wire.We used this 2-foot wide 1/2” opening hardware cloth, though wider rolls are available too.With the bed sitting right-side-up, place the hardware cloth on top of the bed.Why don’t we just attach it to the bottom side of the bed frame, you ask?Once the bottom wire basket is in place, add a layer (or two) of commercial-duty landscape fabric on top of it.Add the landscape fabric to the inside bottom of the bed in a similar manner as the hardware cloth.When adding the landscape fabric to the bottom of the bed, I made sure we had plenty of excess and it sat loosely inside.A view of the bottom of the bed with the new basket bottom in place.If this style and example doesn’t work in your situation for whatever reason, there are still a TON of other options to garden on a patio, deck, balcony, driveway, or other hardscapes!The bottom is essentially solid, made of the same redwood 2×6” boards used for the rest of the box.We drilled several large half-inch drainage holes in the bottom, before lining the interior with landscape fabric and adding soil.We also use half wine barrels as planting containers, with drainage holes added to the bottom.Essentially, any container with drainage can be used to grow food!We drill several 1/2″ or 3/4″ holes in the bottom of each one, and then line the bottom with landscape fabric to the soil doesn’t eventually clog the holes.And that is how you build a raised garden bed to put on concrete

What Kind Of Wood Should I Use For Raised Vegetable Beds

What Kind Of Wood Should I Use For Raised Vegetable Beds

Want to know the best wood for raised garden beds?Raised beds are garden containers, commonly made from wood, and the type of wood we use will determine how long-lasting, safe, and sustainable they are.If you are looking for designs, I have free plans for building raised garden beds here .Wood is a popular choice for building plant boxes because it’s fairly inexpensive, readily available, and lasts quite a few years.What is the Best Wood for Raised Garden Beds?I currently use 1″ untreated pine boards because they are readily available in my area.If you can, use wood with FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) certification.TIP: To be cautious, some gardeners line their treated wood beds with a protective layer of plastic to form a barrier between the wood and soil.Again, you will need to research the plastic to ensure it is food safe and consider the effects of condensation forming between the plastic and the wood.CCA Wood Do not use CCA (Chromated copper arsenate) pressure-treated wood or old railway ties.As thrifty gardeners, we like to repurpose wood that seems to be in good condition, but this is not an option with old, treated wood.Read more: Staying Safe Around Treated Wood | Government of Canada.My current raised beds are made from 1″ untreated pine and last approximately 10 years.If your raised beds will be exposed to a lot of moisture, wood like pine may only last a few years.There are more: feel free to email me with good recommendations from your area.Older paints with lead are a big concern.Wood Alternatives for Building Raised Beds.As with any building materials, you must do your own research to make sure the choices you make are safe, eco-friendly, sustainable, and right for your situation.These are ideas to explore, not recommendations.These are not considered safe for gardens.Concrete blocks are generally considered fine but always check what the product is made from to be sure.These all have safety concerns: Cinder blocks.Paints, stains, finishes | Check with the manufacturer first.Free Plans for Building Raised Garden Beds.Save On Soil

Can You Make A Raised Garden Out Of Treated Lumber

Can You Make A Raised Garden Out Of Treated Lumber

Using Pressure Treated Wood For Raised Gardens...In June of 2010, they worked with local volunteers (as part of a wider series of repair and rebuilding projects) to build a series of raised gardens so the local folk could grow some of their own produce (see photo below).I have been pelted with questions for years concerning the safety of using pressure treated wood for vegetable gardens.Yes, the "new" pressure treated wood is safe for use for raised garden frames..

How To Build Raised Garden Bed

How To Build Raised Garden Bed

Earlier this year, I invited my email group to send me any questions they would like me to answer on the topic of raised bed gardening.It’s my goal to answer all your questions from A to Z, planning to harvest and maintenance, starting with this first episode in this raised bed gardening series.If you would like to join the conversation and contribute to future topics, click the red “Get Free Updates” button at the top of this page.The focus of the show was backyard food production in raised beds from seed to harvest.Three years, two different locations, 52 episodes, and zero failures later, I attribute my gardening success in large part to all the practices that I will share with you in this series.My Growing a Greener World team and I have traveled all over the country and seen many raised bed garden setups.As part of the Growing a Greener World series, I built my GardenFarm and turned what was five acres of overgrown brush into a large, productive raised bed garden and developing landscape.Raised beds provide you control over the health of the soil in which you are growing your plants.Raised beds can put plants at eye level for better observation of pest issues.Just that little bit of added convenience makes it easier to work in the garden, even on those days where I might be tempted to just kick back with a cold beverage.By using raised beds, there really aren’t any surface issues that should hold you back from gardening.So, no matter how bad the ground you’re starting with, anyone anywhere can grow a productive raised bed garden.In 2009, I was challenged to build an entire garden (including plants) for $25 or less and was fortunate to find 110-year-old barn wood to use for my raised bed structure.For most, this is a benefit, but if there’s a possibility you will need to relocate your garden in coming years, a permanent raised bed structure will need to be deconstructed.If the sidewalls of your bed aren’t very thick, the bordering soil and plants could be impacted by extreme conditions.During this series, I’ll cover some ways to significantly reduce this downside, but the fact remains.Bear in mind that these guidelines and principles apply most to an edible garden – growing fruits and vegetables.Those edible plants require lots of sun to mature fully and set fruit for your harvest.If your property is shaded by lots of trees, you may want to consider some selective pruning to allow the sun to reach your garden spot.Spending some time each day also helps you catch pests and disease in early stages.If your garden is tucked away on the other end of your yard, and that distance feels like a trek after a long day; you might be inclined to have a seat on your favorite chair instead.And don’t forget, you want those garden edibles to be as close to the kitchen as possible for a quick dinner.If at all possible, don’t site your garden in an area where water tends to pool on your property.If you are in a rural area and subject to visitation by frequent furry nibblers, like deer or raccoons; incorporate fence planning into your overall design.Going higher than 18” can potentially cause more structural issues down the road – due to the weight and pressure of all that soil.Will the surface allow the soil to erode out the bottom (go higher), or might it be impacted by the weight of the bed (don’t go too high)?Four feet allows more flexibility for spacing rows, but more importantly, not building beyond that width will allow you to easily reach the center from either side of the bed.It’s important that you don’t have to step into the bed to weed, plant, etc., as that will compact the soil and affect drainage and overall health.As long as you can reach all areas of the bed from the edge (staying within that four-foot width), you’re all set.Maybe you are truly blessed and have bare, level, beautiful earth just waiting for you to come along and plunk some beds down.Then, you are like the rest of us who have (or had) to put a little blood, sweat, and tears into claiming our garden spot from turf or shrub or weeds.Rent a sod cutter to remove that turf pretty quickly and easily – but be forewarned, this will involve a hit to your budget.Solarizing will take some time (4-8 weeks), but it is a great way to kill much of the weed growth and seeds for 2-3” below the soil surface.To solarize, mow the area as low to the ground as possible, then thoroughly wet it down – really soak it well.If any holes are poked into the plastic at any point during the solarization process, cover them with duct tape.The good news is that solarization can kill Bermuda grass runners as well as some of the rhizomes.So while solarization can be effective against Bermuda grass, be prepared to continue this battle for many years to come.Bermuda grass is so persistent; it is the only time I might consider placing a layer of landscape cloth under my raised bed structures.I strongly encourage you to build some sort of border around the edge of your bed to prevent Bermuda grass creeping in from the perimeter.Bermuda grass needs plenty of sunlight, so when buried under layers of soil, it’s not as likely to sprout up from underneath.Fortunately though, raised beds prevent the necessity to remove most of the stumps and roots left behind.Much of the remaining woody material will be buried in your garden beds and will break down over time, adding a few nutrients to the soil.You may also opt to till the garden area to tear up existing roots, weeds, etc.There is some drawback to tilling your soil that I discuss at length in the video blog mentioned earlier.Studies have shown that water doesn’t move as freely from a dense to a less-dense layer.The deeper you build your beds, the less likely this will be a problem, and again if this is the best area you have to work with, don’t let that hold you back!I used 16’ lengths of 6”x6” untreated cedar at the GardenFarm but living in the heavily-populated Atlanta area offers me a better supply of wood materials than will be available for many of you.If you live in a hot and muggy area, untreated wood may only see you through a couple of years.There haven’t been many studies on the impact of using paints or stains for garden bed structure.The arsenic in CCA led manufacturers of CCA-treated wood to discontinue its availability for residential applications in 2003.If you’re using lots of compost, you should be fine, since plants don’t even take up arsenic unless the soil is deficient in phosphorus.And that’s likely not the case since phosphorus tends to be immobile and ongoing amendments of compost just add to the overall volume.In other words, really healthy soil with lots of organic matter does not take up arsenic by plant roots.At any rate, that would be a good indicator of a potential problem – in which case you might want to think about having your soil tested for metal concentrations.Your tomatoes and your eggplant could absorb copper or arsenic into their roots, but it is generally not shown to affect the fruit.As an extra precaution, grow leafy greens and root vegetables more toward the center of your bed (12” from the perimeter if possible), furthest from the treated wood.A final note: When building treated wood beds, make your cuts somewhere that allows you to contain the sawdust.Virtually all concrete blocks are made of what’s called Portland cement as well as aggregate, like sand or gravel.And here’s the real rub: fly ash contains various amounts of toxic metals; including arsenic, lead, and mercury.While that might sound scary, the risk of those metals becoming available in the soil only happens if part of the concrete block is pulverized.Next, soils higher in organic matter are always beneficial but especially in this case, because they help chemically bind the metals – making them unavailable for absorption into the plant.Just as with CCA-treated wood, root crops and leafy greens are most susceptible when exposed to higher concentrations.If you have beds made from concrete blocks, just avoid anything that would cause them to break to the point that the dust from pulverized pieces can come in contact with plant roots.If building raised beds over a concrete surface, the same risks and preventions would apply.It appears to be a benign product for garden use, but there isn’t much information out there to make a solid determination.Creosote is used as a wood preservative for industrial use and is the black, oily stuff you see oozing from the sides of the ties.The heft of railroad ties has made them a popular choice for raised beds and garden retaining walls.While there have been few studies on the impact of using them to contain edible plants, I’ll take the advice provided directly from the EPA on creosote:.There’s little scientific information available examining the effect of galvanized metal in the use of raised beds.What I can tell you is that the galvanization process typically involves dipping the metal in molten zinc or zinc-based coating.If too much zinc were leached into the soil, it would probably reflect in dying plants, before it would ever pose a health risk.As a result, your soil will tend to dry out more quickly, and foliage in the line of that reflective power might suffer.It might be wise to plant those tender vegetables – like lettuce – toward the center of the bed where soil temperature will remain most constant.It doesn’t get much easier than one of the many raised bed kits available for purchase today.I recently built raised beds on an episode of Growing a Greener World, so check that out.GGW Blog: Salvaging 110-year old wood – My Quest for a Twenty-five Dollar Organic Victory Garden

When Should You Start Planting A Garden

When Should You Start Planting A Garden

1 Find your zone Enter your zip code below to find your planting zone 2 Choose your plants Browse through over 150 vegetables, herbs, flowers & fruits 3 Explore your calendar Learn which plants to grow in your zone & when to plant them.Two of the most important aspects of gardening are knowing when to plant and what to plant in your vegetable or flower garden.Planting calendars are designed to calculate the best time to start seeds and plant a garden.Timing for all planting is based on first and last frost dates.From specific plants and vegetables that thrive in one particular zone, to when to plant, to how much water they need, to when to harvest, the Gilmour Planting Calendar provides everything you need to know to grow a bountiful garden.Keep frost dates in mind when deciding when to plant to ensure you have a garden that grows and produces as much as possible.A planting calendar helps you decide exactly when to plant every type of vegetable.Determining when to plant flowers is easy once you learn the first and last frost date in your zone.Always look at the type of flower to see if it will tolerate your zone and frost dates.Most herbs can be started from seed indoors or outdoors.Planting fruit trees in early spring or late winter is typically fine if planting them in the ground.Other fruit such as strawberries can go in the ground as early as 6 weeks prior to the last average frost date in an area.It’s based on growing zone, frost dates and a plant’s maturity date and needs.A planting schedule can be created by determining the first frost date and then working backwards.Some do so simply to get a jump start on the gardening season, since the process can be started even while still cold out.One of the most important components to starting plants from seeds is timing.A better way than size to tell if a plant is mature enough to be transplanted is by the number of true leaves it has.If a seedling has between 3 and 4 true leaves, it is likely ready.For example, in Florida, you can plant peppers and tomatoes in February to enjoy a summer harvest, and then again in early fall for a winter harvest.When is the best time to plant a garden?Just like water, soil, light and other growing conditions, plants can have very different needs for the best time to be planted.The only way to know for sure is to use a gardening calendar that calculates the first expected and last average last frost date in a specific zone – this will help determine planting timing for each plant

Raised Garden Bed What Soil To Use

Raised Garden Bed What Soil To Use

So, what is the best soil for a raised garden bed?Filling a raised bed will likely require more soil than you think.The best soil for a raised garden bed.Whatever you end up using, you want to make sure you amend it with compost.I filled my beds with about 3/4 triple mix, and even though it had compost in it, I top-dressed the garden with about ¼ compost.Amending the soil in your raised bed.Topping up your beds with compost will add nutrients back into the soil to prepare it for whatever you plant next.This fills them back up to the top.It’s a good idea to do a soil pH test from time to time, so you can make the necessary amendments that will help your crops to flourish.Growing cover crops is also a great way to add nutrients back into the soil

When Should A Garden Be Planted In Michigan

When Should A Garden Be Planted In Michigan

Check out our “How to Grow” series in our Resources section for more information on growing specific vegetables.Plant Your vegetable Garden

Best Raised Garden Bed For Herbs

Best Raised Garden Bed For Herbs

That way, when I’m in the middle of making dinner and realize I forgot to harvest a handful of basil or parsley, it’s only a few steps away.Of course, growing herbs in containers will also keep aggressive spreaders, like mint and lemon balm, under control and away from garden beds.Many gardeners struggle to grow great basil, but give it well-drained soil and plenty of sunshine and it’s usually smooth sailing.Like most herbs, basil responds well to frequent harvesting, and will continue to push out fresh growth when trimmed back.Oregano is an enthusiastic grower in the garden and putting it in a pot is an easy and beautiful way to control its growth.The small leaves are packed with flavor, perfect for topping homemade pizza and bruschetta, as well as adding to vinaigrettes and marinades.Rosemary is a woody shrub with aromatic, needle-like foliage that adds a welcome depth of flavor to roasted potatoes and chicken dishes.In my zone 5 garden, rosemary is an annual, but growing it in pots makes it easy to bring indoors to a sunny windowsill once the days start to cool down in mid-autumn.There are many cultivars of rosemary, with most growing upright, but a few do cascade down, making them perfect for the edges of pots and planters.I really like Gorizia, an upright cultivar with large leaves and Arp, which is a slightly more cold tolerant variety.Plus, it looks fantastic when planted at the front of a container where the tiny leaves can mound over the edge of the pot.We add the leaves to summer drinks, fruit salad, and also dry plenty for winter tea.Whether you’re growing vegetables, flowers, or herbs in pots, you’ll find the greatest success when you use containers with adequate drainage.Worm castings are also an easy way to boost soil nutrients and moisture retention and you only need to add a handful to containers as a little goes a long way.Certain herbs prefer very well-drained soil (thyme, oregano, rosemary), while others like more moisture (mint, coriander, lemon balm)

How To Tier A Sloped Garden

How To Tier A Sloped Garden

Choose from super-chic, contemporary plans that include neat tiers, smartly rendered retaining walls, and slick water features, or go for wilder and more relaxed plant-packed borders, informal mown paths and rippling streams.And if you want even more inspiration for your outdoor space, head over to our garden layout ideas feature.Sloping garden ideas can help to show off your borders (Image credit: Polly Eltes/Future).Sloping garden ideas can be used to create show-stopping impact, as seen in this plot.Meanwhile, the seating space is given plenty of shelter, positioned on a decked area at the same level as the house.This tiered plot designed by Living Gardens demonstrates how sloping garden ideas can be used to create a modern, attractive space that all the family can enjoy.Above, a paved seating area is surrounded by a curved planter, which softens the design and provides soothing visual interest.A lush lawn takes up the lower level of the plot.Slopes don't have to be flattened – they can provide character and opportunity for interesting design.On one side, a series of tiered level beds cuts into the area.'On the other side of the lawn, we created a small stream that uses the natural fall in the land to meander down to a pond set into the patio by the house,' Nigel says.'Sloping sections of a garden can be hidden within the planted areas enabling other areas to be flattened for practical use,' says Jo Fenton of Fenton Roberts Garden Design.Add statement steps to your sloping garden ideas.Whether you are linking terraces or adding definition to a steep slope, a set of practical and eye-catching steps will help define and add structure to the outside space.Instead, opt for some prefabricated metal steps – such as Corten steel designs – for your sloping garden ideas.Mix smart steps and sloping beds.Think carefully about choosing materials and the finished look.Check out our garden steps ideas feature.Use gabions as a retaining wall.This gabion wall is a striking garden feature.Retaining walls are key to terracing sloping garden ideas and can become striking garden wall ideas too.Introducing tiered garden ideas to a steeply sloping plot is an effective way to manage the space and create a series of small but useable areas too.Build in steps and borders.Adding return walls to a retaining wall and flight of steps can create a striking feature in steep gardens on a slope.Dividing a steeply sloping garden into tiers doesn't have to result in a space that's split up by hard, straight lines.This beautiful garden designed by Amanda Broughton Garden Design uses sweeping paths and stone walls as part of its sloping garden ideas (Image credit: Amanda Broughton Garden Design).In this beautiful design, a snaking stone wall creates a cozy seating area and also provides the opportunity for a falling water feature.We have lots more inspiration in our decking railing ideas feature.Use sloping garden ideas to showcase planting.A garden that slopes up from the house or patio is the perfect opportunity to show off beautiful planting.Terrace with easy-care decking.The best composite decking is a smart, no-fuss and versatile material – perfect for creating steps and usable levels in a sloping garden.This large garden by Acres Wild Garden Design has a beautiful, natural feel to its landscaping design (Image credit: Acres Wild).Designed by Nordland Landscapes, this garden makes the most of its sloping plot (Image credit: Krisztian Sipos Photography/Garden design by Nordland Landscapes).This modern take on a rockery was designed by Wildroof Landscapes (Image credit: Jo Crompton Photography/Garden design by Wildroof Landscapes).Sloping garden ideas can be brought to life with gorgeous garden lighting, like in this garden designed by Living Gardens (Image credit: Living Gardens).'In the pictured garden, the gradient was so steep that we needed to step down three steps straight out of the house.Nigel Gomme, Landscape Designer of CITYSCAPERS adds, 'A sloping garden is typically viewed as problematic but as a designer I love slopes as they embody a kind of three dimensional potential that can lead to unique and really engaging spaces.'.Clever sloping garden ideas can include fabulous terraced structures, like in this garden designed by CITYSCAPERS (Image credit: CITYSCAPERS).In general, you don't need permission to level your garden as part of your sloping garden ideas.The point here is that to level a garden you don't necessarily have to level the ground itself, you can build level structures above it instead.'.Head over to our guide on landscaping around trees.This can be solved by adding a raised terrace to the back of the house

Best Method For Raised Garden Beds

Best Method For Raised Garden Beds

The raised beds at the Garden Farm™.Are you building a raised bed garden, or are you looking to improve your raised bed crops?As a long-time raised bed gardener, I am thrilled to see how many of you are looking to start your raised beds for the very first time – and want to make sure you get off on the right foot.One thing is certain, the information available on the internet regarding materials, methods, risks, etc.It’s my goal to answer all your questions from A to Z, planning to harvest and maintenance, starting with this first episode in this raised bed gardening series.My Raised Bed Gardening Background.We’ve seen beds over concrete, lots of community gardens, just about everything.Six seasons later, the gardens are beautiful, incredibly productive and a little easier to keep in “television-ready” shape.The truth is, I feel that all these years televising my gardening techniques – regardless of the location – my garden has been … everybody’s garden.I’ve just been in charge of building and maintaining it.Why Use Raised Garden Beds?Raised beds provide you control over the health of the soil in which you are growing your plants.The goal is to create a deep, wide growing area that encourages plant roots to grow down and outward.When the bed is contained in a structure, you are better able to really get in there and work your bed without impacting the overall shape.Just that little bit of added convenience makes it easier to work in the garden, even on those days where I might be tempted to just kick back with a cold beverage.Raising the garden surface raises your plants above problem soil and can prevent plant roots from reaching those contaminants.So, no matter how bad the ground you’re starting with, anyone anywhere can grow a productive raised bed garden.Building raised beds can be expensive.For most, this is a benefit, but if there’s a possibility you will need to relocate your garden in coming years, a permanent raised bed structure will need to be deconstructed.The raised soil is more exposed to heat and cold than surface soil.Raised soil can dry out more quickly than surface soil.Garden Area Planning.You don’t need to have a lot of space to build a raised bed garden.Be sure to check out the Growing a Greener World blog on that topic and the considerations on this.It’s best if the garden area is relatively level.Get that area as level as you can before you build.If your spot isn’t level, and you don’t have the ability to level the ground, just bear in mind that your raised bed surfaces will need to be level once complete.If not, will it be practical to lay a garden hose from the spigot to the garden area?If at all possible, don’t site your garden in an area where water tends to pool on your property.(If you checked out last week’s podcast, you’d know that an 18” depth is also the perfect seating height.).It’s important that you don’t have to step into the bed to weed, plant, etc., as that will compact the soil and affect drainage and overall health.Solarize the area.Remember that this process kills the weeds down to about 3” of soil, so if you dig after solarization, you’ll be bringing those deeper weed seeds back to the surface to cause you more grief.One drawback to solarization is the ultimate disposal of the plastic sheeting.Bermuda grass is so persistent; it is the only time I might consider placing a layer of landscape cloth under my raised bed structures.I strongly encourage you to build some sort of border around the edge of your bed to prevent Bermuda grass creeping in from the perimeter.It doesn’t take much to kill a season or more of garden crop, so think twice before deciding to take this particular shortcut.I’ve received lots of questions about building raised beds on this.The deeper you build your beds, the less likely this will be a problem, and again if this is the best area you have to work with, don’t let that hold you back!Why do materials matter?Secondly, the soil you place in your bed will need to remain fairly moist, and the exterior surfaces of your bed will be spending a lot of time in the hot sun.The lifespan of your wood will depend on wood type and your environment.It’s more a matter of maintenance and realistically assessing what will work best for you and your family.I recommend against painting the exterior only of your raised bed structure.The wood exposed to the moist soil will wick up moisture, but the exterior paint won’t allow the wood to fully “breathe.” So by painting the exterior only, you will be trapping the moisture inside and shortening the lifespan of your wood.Treated Wood:.Treated wood has been infused with chemical elements to preserve the wood.They have a higher concentration of copper but don’t have the arsenic.When you (or especially, your kids) sit on or lean on treated wood, your skin or clothing is most likely to absorb the copper or arsenic leaching out of the wood to remain on the surface.In other words, really healthy soil with lots of organic matter does not take up arsenic by plant roots.At any rate, that would be a good indicator of a potential problem – in which case you might want to think about having your soil tested for metal concentrations.While we’re on the subject, root vegetables are at greatest risk of being impacted by leaching, as most metals (when taken up) remain in plant roots.Studies further show that those root vegetables are impacted most on their surface.In short: Keep your soil near neutral and add lots of compost (more on both of these later), thoroughly wash off the soil and peel the skin from your root vegetables, and avoid contact with the exterior surface of the treated wood.So, yes, those metals are in the concrete blocks that line your vegetable garden too.Then, it’s a matter of several factors that determine the potential risk to what you are growing.So, how much fly ash is absorbed by soil held within a concrete block structure?If you have beds made from concrete blocks, just avoid anything that would cause them to break to the point that the dust from pulverized pieces can come in contact with plant roots.If building raised beds over a concrete surface, the same risks and preventions would apply.There is so much information out there on the subject, and it will quickly take you in many directions.Composite Wood:.Composite wood is made of recycled materials and can last for years.Railroad ties are made with creosote, an oil distilled from coal tar.While there have been few studies on the impact of using them to contain edible plants, I’ll take the advice provided directly from the EPA on creosote:.One thing you should bear in mind, however, is heat and drainage.Whether you use metal sheeting or a trough, that metal will absorb and reflect heat from the sun – more than other materials.Some can be expensive, and the material with which they are made can vary widely.I recently built raised beds on an episode of Growing a Greener World, so check that out.If you use any of the above materials with the potential of leaching, you might be inclined to line the bed with plastic.Yes, this will provide a barrier between the bed material and your soil.But don’t lose sight of the plastic material itself.Don’t block drainage with plastic.Be sure to watch for next week’s podcast when I’ll continue the raised bed journey, discussing two of the raised bed topics that generated the most questions – structure material and soil.Episode 041: Small Space Garden Design joegardener Blog: No-Till Gardening: If You Love Your Soil, Ditch the Tiller.Episode 043: Raised Bed Gardening, Pt.Episode 044: Raised Bed Gardening, Pt

Best Raised Bed Soil For Vegetables

Best Raised Bed Soil For Vegetables

This is especially advantageous for those whose property has hard-packed or clay soil, issues with tree roots, or concerns about pollutants.And since good soil is the foundation of a healthy garden, you want to make sure you’re setting your veggies up for success.The soil in a raised bed will remain loose and friable, rather than being hard-packed over time by footsteps.When I built my raised beds, I called around and ordered what I thought would be a good-quality triple mix.In Ontario where I live, triple mix is generally top soil, compost, and peat moss or black loam.All that rich organic matter is an important component that will hold moisture and provide nutrients to your plants.Topping up your beds with compost will add nutrients back into the soil to prepare it for whatever you plant next.To maintain the health of even the best soil for a raised garden bed, adding organic matter every year is essential.I find the soil levels in my raised beds are usually lower from the weight of the snow.If you have smaller containers to fill, check out Jessica’s recipes in her DIY potting soil article

Raised Garden Beds You Tube

Raised Garden Beds You Tube

Of course, you don’t need a raised bed to grow great-tasting produce—most any plot of flat ground that gets full sun will suffice for that.But gardening in a raised bed offers a number of advantages.Build the sides high enough and you can even garden while sitting.Raised-Bed Gardens.Seaman, who shares his gardening know-how online at Eartheasy.com, has been growing vegetables in raised beds for nearly 40 years.Choose a spot that gets at least 8 hours of sun a day, and orient each bed so its long side runs east to west.Choose a spot that gets at least 8 hours of sun a day, and orient each bed so its long side runs east to west.Beds built with western red cedar can last 10 to 15 years; galvanized steel, 20 years; masonry or plastic composites, indefinitely.Build a Raised Garden Bed from Scratch or a Kit.Or you could hire a mason to build one for you out of brick or stone.They’re held in place by aluminum corners coated with a tough, baked-on finish and are capped with western red cedar.HEIGHT: Low beds are less work to construct and fill, but require double digging to prep soil beneath the bed.High beds mean less digging and less stooping, but need more soil and building materials.How deep to make it?This organic matter helps retain water in sandy soil and improve drainage in clay soils.Choose Your Material: Wood.There’s more than one way to build a bed frame.Fitted together and held in place with dabs of construction adhesive, natural stone or look-alike cast-concrete blocks don’t need mortar or a footing, just a tamped crushed-stone base.Shown: 48-by-48-by-11-inch Raised Garden kit, $90; Vita.If you want an organic bed from the start, buy bagged soils and compost that are OMRI-Listed; they’ve been certified by the Organic Materials Review Institute.Hold them in place with netting so they don’t blow away.Do this 30 to 60 days before the first frost so the seeds have time to germinate.Shown: Fill the bed right to the top with soil; it will soon settle a few inches, leaving a lip to hold in the mulch.Design the Corners of Your Garden Bed.With prefab connectors, you can quickly build beds with your choice of wood or composite planks.Four Sided.This wood-plastic composite corner has grooves on all sides to join corners and side walls, and even to link up with other beds, no screws required.Shown: Stacking Bracket, $15; Frame It All.Hay (alfalfa or a grass) breaks down faster, enriching the soil; but avoid the fresh stuff used for animal feed—it contains weed seeds.Hay (alfalfa or a grass) breaks down faster, enriching the soil; but avoid the fresh stuff used for animal feed—it contains weed seeds.GRASS CLIPPINGS: They’re high in nitrogen and break down quickly, but apply them just 1 inch thick to prevent matting.SEAWEED: Rinsed of salt, this nutrient-rich material contains no weed seeds, acts as a natural fertilizer, and, once dry, stops slugs.Shown: Straw mulch keeps leaves and produce clean and dry.$49 for 100-foot kit; Dripdepot Drip line: The most efficient and longest-lasting irrigation option, it’s also the most expensive ($76 for 50-foot kit; Dripdepot).Quarter-inch lines are limited to 30-foot runs; ½-inch lines can go up to 200 feet.Quarter-inch lines are limited to 30-foot runs; ½-inch lines can go up to 200 feet.Leave the panels’ top edge exposed so roots can’t grow over it.Enclose your vegetable garden with a fence at least 3 feet tall and 3 feet from your beds.A slanted 8-wire fence, like that sold by Gallagher, is only 4 ½ feet high but 6 feet deep.A grid-style trellis attached to a raised bed provides the support that peas and beans need as they climb toward the sun.Mount the trellis on the bed’s north side, so it doesn’t shade the other plants, and leave enough space between the strings or wires—at least 5 inches—so you can reach in and harvest the ripe pods from the back side.Raised Garden Bed Inspiration.The 20-inch-high walls of this U-shaped, western red cedar kit-built bed put plants within easy reach.Shown: 8-by-8-foot Raised Garden-Bed Kit with Deer Fence, $1,849; Outdoor Living Today.Materials cost for a 4-by-12-foot bed similar to shown: about $375.You can stack the finished frames as high as you like.Shown: two of The Farmstead’s 24-by-72-by-8-inch raised garden bed kits, $100 each; Garden Raised Beds