Can I Grow Herbs Outside In Winter

Can I Grow Herbs Outside In Winter

Cold-hardy herbs, such as chives, mint, oregano, parsley, sage and thyme, can often survive cold-winter temperatures while continuing to produce flavorful foliage, as long as they are provided with some protection or grown indoors.Herbs 1: Bachman’s Landscape Design – Tom Haugo, original photo on Houzz.Herbs 2: Home & Garden Design, Atlanta – Danna Cain, ASLA, original photo on Houzz.Covering herbs helps trap the heat that rises from the soil, elevating the temperature inside by several degrees.Cold frames are topped with glass panes that slope downward and are situated so they face south.Place each one over individual herb plants and nestle the bottom inch or two of the cloche into the soil to anchor it.Many herbs can grow through the winter under the insulation provided from straw, shredded bark or other coarse mulch.Cut them back to 1 inch tall and, using a sharp shovel, divide them at their base, making sure to include the roots so each one will fit into the container.Herbs can be grown from seed or cuttings and make a great addition to a sunny kitchen window that gets at least six hours of sunlight.The rewards of growing herbs indoors throughout the winter are great when the fresh flavor of summer is within arm’s reach.This is a useful way to prolong the harvest, whether you bring in cuttings from the garden or buy fresh herbs at the grocery store.Simply cut the ends of each stem and put them in a small jar or cup filled with water

When Can You Plant Herb Garden

When Can You Plant Herb Garden

Click here to open an expanded version of this chart in a new tab: Growing Guide to Herbs.Click here to open an expanded version of this chart in a new tab: Growing Guide to Herbs

How To Keep A Herb Garden Alive

How To Keep A Herb Garden Alive

We wanted to re-share this post from a few years ago since it’s the perfect time to grow your own herb garden.Having fresh herb plants to keep in your kitchen are not only handy, they help limit that extra trip to the store when your recipe calls for them.I’ve done a little research to help out anyone interested in growing their favorite herbs this summer—even if you don’t have the greenest thumb.In the past, I’ve opted for indoors but be cautioned that some (not all) herbs need at least four to six hours of direct sunlight.This year I planted my herbs that need direct sunlight in a terra-cotta pot outside so I can eventually bring them indoors at the end of the season.If you’re not sure when your potted herbs need water, stick your finger into the top inch or two of soil and check to see if its dry.You’ll be surprised how large hearty herb plants like basil, rosemary, and mint can get

Best Herbs For Garden Box

Best Herbs For Garden Box

Many herbs thrive in containers, but those that maintain a smaller habit and shallow roots are the ideal choices.The lone biennial (plants that produce seed in the second year) in this list, parsley, pairs well with annuals and perennials.Thriving in lots of heat and full sun, this flavorful herb loves containers of all shapes and sizes and grows well from seed.Its lustrous, green leaves are a lovely complement to mixes of flowers and edibles planted in nutrient-rich potting soil.Help it thrive by amending your containers with finished compost before planting and during the growing season.While cilantro doesn’t dehydrate well, it’s lovely when used fresh in salads, salsas and as a garnish in soups and stews.Garlic chives flower in late summer or early fall and keep producing tasty, garlicky greens all season long.As one of the earliest herbs to sprout and produce in springtime, sorrel is a welcome addition to any mixed pot or planter box.Use it raw, add to early spring salads, or layer in sandwiches for a lemony tang.Confining it to its own pot (or mixed with one or two other herbs) is a great way to keep it under control while having easy access for tea and garnishes.Adding oregano to a deep, wide planter with one or two other herbs or annual vegetables helps keep it contained.Tolerant of light, sandy soils that are low in nutrients, French tarragon is another easy-to-grow herb that has many uses in the kitchen.While our favorite is tarragon vinegar–which we use in everything from salad dressings to vegetable dishes–tarragon is an excellent complement to green beans, roasted beets, potatoes and more.Tarragon is easiest to grow when starting with purchased plants, root divisions, or cuttings.One of the tiniest of herbs, thyme also packs a strong flavor that goes well in soups and poultry dishes.No matter where you put it, thyme will spread slowly over the season, developing woody stems that support tiny, fragrant leaves.Lemon verbena is technically a perennial, though it won’t grow year round outdoors in anything less than zone 9.Whichever you choose, plant lemon verbena in loose, well-drained soil located in full sun.Prized for its delicious scent and fresh flavor, lemon verbena is perfect for teas and deserts, or simply enjoy its amazing fragrance.It’s also a perfect companion to container growing, thanks to the plant’s predictable habit and slow growth.Unlike its closely related summer cousin, winter savory comes back year after year–and will remain evergreen in warmer locations

How To Protect Herb Garden From Deer

How To Protect Herb Garden From Deer

Today, I’d like to share all of the things I’ve learned and present a four step plan for building gorgeous, nearly deer proof gardens.The key for me has been employing a combination of all four of the tactics I list below and being vigilant about noting which ones are the most effective against each different herd.This step may seem like a no-brainer, but I’m constantly surprised by the number of gardeners who complain about the deer eating their hosta.If you feel small hairs on the leaves – whether bristly or soft – it’s probably a good plant choice for deer proof gardens.Deer-resistant garden plants in this category include lambs ear (Stachys), lady’s mantle (Alchemilla), Siberian bugloss (Brunnera), flowering tobacco (Nicotiana), tuberous begonias, heliotrope, yarrow (Achillea), Ageratum, poppies, purple top vervain (Verbena bonariensis), and many others.If you feel small hairs on the leaves – whether bristly or soft – it’s probably a good plant choice for deer proof gardens.Deer-resistant garden plants in this category include lambs ear (Stachys), lady’s mantle (Alchemilla), Siberian bugloss (Brunnera), flowering tobacco (Nicotiana), tuberous begonias, heliotrope, yarrow (Achillea), Ageratum, poppies, purple top vervain (Verbena bonariensis), and many others.In this category are bear’s breeches (Acanthus), globe thistle (Echinops), Cardoon, and sea hollies (Eryngium), among others.In this category are bear’s breeches (Acanthus), globe thistle (Echinops), Cardoon, and sea hollies (Eryngium), among others.Plants with very aromatic foliage confuse Bambi’s olfactory system and discourage feeding, making them the perfect addition to deer proof gardens.Other plants resistant to deer with fragrant foliage are catmint (Nepeta), hyssop (Agastache), Artemisia, Russian sage (Perovskia), boxwood (Buxus), Salvias, tansy (Tanacetum), bee balm (Monarda), mountain mint (Pycnanthemum), dead nettle (Lamium), blue mist shrub (Caryopteris), dill, lantana, and calamint (Calamintha).Plants with very aromatic foliage confuse Bambi’s olfactory system and discourage feeding, making them the perfect addition to deer proof gardens.Other plants resistant to deer with fragrant foliage are catmint (Nepeta), hyssop (Agastache), Artemisia, Russian sage (Perovskia), boxwood (Buxus), Salvias, tansy (Tanacetum), bee balm (Monarda), mountain mint (Pycnanthemum), dead nettle (Lamium), blue mist shrub (Caryopteris), dill, lantana, and calamint (Calamintha).All ferns contain compounds that deer can’t tolerate, so do false indigo (Baptisia), bleeding hearts (Lamprocapnos/Dicentra), daffodils, Helleborus, monkshood (Aconitum), spurges (Euphorbia), and poppies (Papaver).All ferns contain compounds that deer can’t tolerate, so do false indigo (Baptisia), bleeding hearts (Lamprocapnos/Dicentra), daffodils, Helleborus, monkshood (Aconitum), spurges (Euphorbia), and poppies (Papaver).Leathery or fibrous foliage: Plants with leaves that are tough to digest are also typically avoided by deer.Pachysandra is in this category, as are most irises, wax and dragonwing begonias, elephant ears (Colocasia and Alocasia), peonies, and some viburnums (including leatherleaf and arrowwood).Pachysandra is in this category, as are most irises, wax and dragonwing begonias, elephant ears (Colocasia and Alocasia), peonies, and some viburnums (including leatherleaf and arrowwood).If you’ve been to a public zoo lately, you may notice that some facilities now separate the giraffes, zebras, cattle, and gazelles from us humans with a wide border of large, irregularly shaped rocks, instead of with a fence.Cattle guards are also quite useful for preventing deer from entering properties via unfenced driveways or roadways.If you’ve been to a public zoo lately, you may notice that some facilities now separate the giraffes, zebras, cattle, and gazelles from us humans with a wide border of large, irregularly shaped rocks, instead of with a fence.They aren’t for everyone, but they are a very effective way to have deer proof gardens, especially if the fence is properly installed and maintained.They aren’t for everyone, but they are a very effective way to have deer proof gardens, especially if the fence is properly installed and maintained.If I had a nickel for every time someone told me that they’ve tried deer sprays and they don’t work, I’d be a rich woman.I set a weekly reminder on my cell phone so I can stay on top of applying deer repellent.I’ve tried at least a dozen different commercial brands and my consistent application practices are a far greater factor in determining the product’s success or failure than the actual ingredients they’re made of.I’ve tried at least a dozen different commercial brands and my consistent application practices are a far greater factor in determining the product’s success or failure than the actual ingredients they’re made of.These products are my “big guns” – I use them in the winter and early spring, when deer browse is the worst where I live.These products are my “big guns” – I use them in the winter and early spring, when deer browse is the worst where I live.Admittedly, I have never used any granular, hanging, or “clip on” deer repellents because I haven’t come across many independent studies that indicate they’re as effective as the spray products I’ve been using for years.Deer deterrents with limited effectiveness include bars of soap, bags of hair, vials of predator urine (how do they get that pee in the first place???They may work for a short time and in a very small area, but in my experience, eventually, the deer completely ignore their presence.Motion-activated sprinklers are a real game-changer when it comes to deterring deer from specific garden areas, but not all of them are created equal.The range of the sprinkler’s aim can be easily adjusted to target a fairly accurate area, making them ideal for protecting vegetable gardens and individual shrub or flower beds.Though they’re effective throughout most of the growing season, these sprinklers are completely useless in the winter, when hoses quickly freeze.Taller sprinklers work better than shorter types, in my experience, as the sensor isn’t “tricked” by moving foliage and the water jet shoots out above plant tops.I prefer battery-powered motion-activated sprinklers over solar powered types that don’t seem to emit as hard a burst of water

Best Medicinal Herbs For Your Garden

Best Medicinal Herbs For Your Garden

The leaves and flowers are an important nervine sedative and are used to help promote sleep and alleviate pain, such as menstrual cramps and headaches.Passionflower loves full sun, and will bloom more profusely when situated to bask in the solar rays, especially if you live further north.I also recommend stratifying the seeds by placing them in damp sand in the refrigerator for one to two months (see these links for more on scarification and stratification).The use of bottom heat, planting in a warm greenhouse, or sowing seeds in late spring will all enhance germination

How To Grow A Raised Herb Garden

How To Grow A Raised Herb Garden

Herbs can be planted anytime from spring to early fall!Look at these beautiful galvanized raised beds from Gardener’s Supply Company I got to plant them in!!The herb garden, this year, is in two handsomely styled galvanized raised beds on our patio.I chose Gardener’s Supply Company Potting Soil with super root booster.Bobby is quite the gardener and he helped me fill the beds with the potting soil.In the fall I’m thinking about planting lettuce in one raised bed.We rolled the beds into position on our patio and began filling them with my favorite herbs!I use fresh herbs all summer in much of my cooking and to create beautiful and aromatic bouquets in my home!My grandmother, Nani, taught me not to be afraid to snip herbs liberally because a good clip makes them grow more!I like to cut herbs in the morning and put them in a glass of water on my counter.Think about using parsley to impart flavor to soups, stew, marinades, and sauces!To freeze fresh parsley I just cut a fresh bunch, rinse it off, dry it completely (don’t miss this step) and stick it in a zip-type bag and off it goes into the freezer.Basil is my very favorite herb in the raised bed garden.It’s wonderful as a finishing herb in sauces and adds bright fresh flavors to marinades.This plant is amazing in sauces like spaghetti and it infuses an earthy flavor to roasted chicken.I love mint to flavor ice tea and desserts and to use as a garnish.I also love to cut a bunch and use it as a little bouquet next to the beds in my guest rooms.I also planted two varieties of thyme, rosemary, and sage in the kitchen garden.These flowers do very well with herbs as they don’t need a lot of water and love the sun.I’ll update you in a few weeks when the herbs are grown in and lush!This post is sponsored by Gardener’s Supply Company but the opinions are 100% mine

How To Grow Herbs Outdoors In Pots

How To Grow Herbs Outdoors In Pots

You can grow as many types of herbs in one container as you want if they share the same sun, water, and soil preferences.Also, don’t forget that herbs can serve as decorative elements in a container garden, adding texture and scent when mixed with annuals or perennials.Plants, such as chives, parsley, marjoram, and mint, are particularly good candidates for growing in self-watering pots.Other herbs, including oregano, thyme, rosemary, and basil, prefer to dry out between watering, so they wouldn’t be good candidates for self-watering containers.This soil, paired with the drainage holes in your container, will help prevent accidentally drowning your herbs.So if you live in a climate where temperatures soar, your container herbs might need to be shaded during the hottest part of the day.The leaves of others including oregano and basil will lose flavor and become bitter if allowed to flower.At the end of the growing season, you can bring many of your herb containers inside if you get lots of indoor sunlight.Many herbs like oregano, sage, rosemary and dill also dry well and can be kept in tightly lidded containers out of direct sunlight for use in cooking all year long

How To Make Herb Garden At Home

How To Make Herb Garden At Home

All of these very common (LOL…) conundrums can be solved by the addition of parsley, dill, mint, basil, rosemary.But herbs sold at the grocery store can be expensive and (sometimes) hard to find, and you almost always end up buying way more than you need, right?Plus, you can trim just the amount that you need—no more tossing out old rotten herbs that had gotten lost in the depths of the refrigerator or you had no idea what to do with.If you have a space that gets about six to eight hours of sunlight on a sunny day, according to Better Homes & Gardens, you can grow herbs.Make sure that you have that sunny spot picked out, as well as the right tools you’ll need for the job: pots with good drainage, plants or seeds, the right soil, maybe a bit of fertilizer (always read and follow directions carefully), a tray to catch any excess water, and a small trowel.If this is all new to you, stick to heartier herbs that aren’t quite so fussy, like rosemary, oregano, thyme, and mint, as per Apartment Therapy.Chives, basil, parsley, and cilantro are all good herbs for beginners, as gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi told EatingWell.You may find that it’s more economical to grow your garden from seeds, rather than buying up small plants to care for, as the University of Illinois Extension noted.You’ll likely need to water your herbs daily—if the soil dries out, the herbs may not do well (though some, like thyme and sage, should be allowed to dry out a bit, according to the Penn State Extension)—but you also want to ensure that you’re not flooding your plants or you could end up with root rot.According to the Penn State Extension, fertilizing more than once every two weeks or so can negatively impact herbs’ flavor, which is definitely not what you want right before you toss a handful of basil into your pasta sauce.Make sure it’s getting good sun (remember, about six to eight hours worth) and that there’s plenty of room for what you want to plant.If you’re a novice, stick to starter herbs like chives, mint, oregano, and the like, until you build up your confidence and experience.Many new growers (or poor planners, in my case) won’t start thinking about which herbs they may want to grow until later.Some herbs don’t like moist (I know) soil, as The Spruce noted, so if you’re hoping to cultivate those, keep them in their pots.Plants placed too close together will crowd each other, potentially causing problems with the root systems, The Spruce noted.The Penn State Extension site recommends following specific spacing guidance that’s printed on the plant containers or seed packages.Martha Stewart told TODAY that you should be sure to water your herbs in the morning, rather than in the evening and to make sure to not over-water.For more specifics about the growing guidelines for different kinds of herbs, check out this very helpful list of tips from Better Homes & Gardens

How Do You Grow Herb Garden

How Do You Grow Herb Garden

Whether you live in a subdivision with a large backyard or an apartment with a balcony, herbs grow well just about anywhere that receives at least 6 hours of sunlight.If possible, select a site near the kitchen so you can quickly snip a handful of oregano while making pasta sauce, or pluck a few basil leaves for bruschetta.Not only will that will inspire you to add interesting flavors to your meals, but you'll also be more likely notice when your plants need watering or if pests invade.If your yard offers rich, well-draining soil in a sunny space free from competing trees and shrubs, planting an herb garden in the ground should work beautifully.From wooden window boxes filled with trailing thymeto pretty ceramic pots full of parsley, containers offer many options.Follow these guidelines to choose the right size and style of container, and make sure it has holes for drainage.A word of caution: With any member of the mint family (including lemon balm), you'll want to plant it in its own container to keep it from spreading and taking over the garden.Check daily to see if they need watering, especially during the summertime or if you're growing in containers, which tend to dry out more quickly than in-ground herb gardens or raised beds.By pinching back basil as soon as you see blooms beginning to form, for instance, you'll extend the herb's harvest life

How To Keep Herb Plants Alive Indoors

How To Keep Herb Plants Alive Indoors

We wanted to re-share this post from a few years ago since it’s the perfect time to grow your own herb garden.Having fresh herb plants to keep in your kitchen are not only handy, they help limit that extra trip to the store when your recipe calls for them.I’ve done a little research to help out anyone interested in growing their favorite herbs this summer—even if you don’t have the greenest thumb.In the past, I’ve opted for indoors but be cautioned that some (not all) herbs need at least four to six hours of direct sunlight.This year I planted my herbs that need direct sunlight in a terra-cotta pot outside so I can eventually bring them indoors at the end of the season.If you’re not sure when your potted herbs need water, stick your finger into the top inch or two of soil and check to see if its dry.You’ll be surprised how large hearty herb plants like basil, rosemary, and mint can get

What Herbs Can Be Planted In The Same Container

What Herbs Can Be Planted In The Same Container

You can grow as many types of herbs in one container as long as they require the same amount of light, water, and soil nutrition.The first and most apparent benefit of planting herbs in the same pot is that it saves up tons of space, which is perfect for those living in urban areas trying to make the most out of their tiny gardens.Basil, parsley, and lemon balm also thrive under a good amount of sunlight and proper drainage, so be sure to put your well-drained container in a sunny spot.Oh, and to make your life easier, did we mention we’ve got a Culinary Garden Kit that contains these herbs, too?Mediterranean herbs such as rosemary, cilantro, thyme, oregano, sage, chives, dill, and lavender love lots of sunlight and generally drier soil.These herbs also enjoy being given fertilizer, and ideally, the soil in the container should be rich, dark, and crumbly when you touch it.Unlike the moisture-loving herbs mentioned above, rosemary, cilantro, thyme, oregano, sage, chives, dill, and lavender prefer to have their soil dry out in between bouts of watering.An ideal spot to put your mint garden would be by a sunny, north-facing window that receives sunlight through a good chunk of the day.If you’re still undecided about what to grow, we recommend planting herbs that you like to cook with or have sprinkled on top of your dish as a fancy garnish.Basil is always a crowd favorite that can liven up any pasta dish, and it grows well with parsley (the universal garnish) too.If you’re a meat-lover, then rosemary, thyme, and oregano are perfect for flavoring juicy steaks, roast chickens, and hearty stews.Of course, if you don’t have a ceramic self-watering planter, then you can use whatever pot you have that’s big enough (at least 18 inches in diameter) to fit multiple herbs.While many homes have a bright windowsill that will work just fine, most people don’t get quite enough sunshine for herbs to thrive.Growing herbs in the comfort of your own space isn’t that complicated if you’re equipped with the proper knowledge and tools

How To Plant An Herb Garden In A Planter Box

How To Plant An Herb Garden In A Planter Box

And when you have fresh herbs growing in your own backyard, porch planters, or window box, this makes it even easier to boost the flavor of your homemade meals.Luckily, there are a variety of ways to grow a spring herb garden – so you’ll have lots of choices.Before you pick out a selection of your favorite herbs, make sure you have the right growing conditions available to help them prosper.If your garden soil doesn’t drain well, you can amend it – or consider going with raised beds or containers instead of putting your herbs directly into the ground.Most herbs prefer soil that has organic matter such as compost incorporated into it, and a slightly acidic to neutral pH between 6.0 and 7.0.If you decide to start your spring herb garden in raised beds or containers, you can use potting mix.If you want to locate your spring herb garden in a dry area, such as near the curb or around a mailbox, you may wish to choose options with lower water requirements, such as sage.In the meantime, if you are interested in learning more about xeriscaping – or creating gardens with very low water needs – have a look at our article on this topic.Most herbs require a full sun location and well-draining soil, and figuring out how to provide this may help you to decide what gardening method to choose.In addition to planters and window boxes, individual terra cotta or plastic pots can be arranged for a pleasing visual effect.An ideal choice for patios, decks, and other small spaces, you can intersperse your potted herbs with flowers for added visual appeal.While growing from seed is more cost efficient overall, be aware that if you start your new spring herbs this way, you may not be able to harvest them until next year.While basil is largely associated with summertime and fresh tomatoes, in many places this culinary superstar can be grown starting in springtime.Basil will perk up a plate of sliced summer tomatoes, or it can be used fresh, minced over sauteed zucchini or grilled fish.If you’re ready to try growing your own basil from seed, ‘Italian Large Leaf’ is a great option.Its large leaves are perfect for making pesto – or for layering with tomatoes and fresh mozzarella.It is frequently called for in recipes to flavor soups, dried bean dishes, and stews.The leaves of bay laurel, typically used dried, are cooked over a long period of time to infuse a dish with a subtle flavor somewhat reminiscent of oregano or thyme.Its leaves are evergreen, and it makes a gorgeous ornamental, looking lovely in decorative pots and planters.Chives may be every gardener’s dream for a low maintenance plant that is both beautiful and edible – and available to harvest every year, starting in spring.You are probably familiar with its long, tubular leaves – commonly seen chopped as a baked potato topping.Chives are delicious in pad thai, minced over scrambled eggs, or as a garnish on roasted potatoes.In fact, chives are such an amazing ingredient, we have a whole guide dedicated to its cooking and medicinal benefits at our sister site, Foodal.Chives do best in full sun but will tolerate partial shade, and like most of the other selections on this list, they need well-drained soil and consistent watering.Perennial in Zones 3-9, it’s safe to plant directly in the ground, but growing chives in containers is also an option.Cilantro is cold hardy and can be sown directly in your soil before the last frost, providing a spring harvest.Found frequently in Mexican, Asian, and Indian cuisine, this herb has a unique, bright flavor, which the haters think tastes like soap.Cilantro can be sprinkled on bowls of beans and rice, used to add some zest to a mac and cheese dish, or as the main ingredient in a non-traditional pesto.Our sister site, Foodal, has a delicious recipe for cilantro cayenne tahini sauce, which would be good on just about anything in your pantry or fridge.‘Calypso’ is a variety that is extremely slow to bolt, meaning even more leafy cilantro love for you through the season.If you’d like to perfect your knowledge of adding this versatile yet flavorfully controversial plant to your garden, we have you covered – see our complete guide to growing cilantro.This small perennial shrub has a calming floral scent, as evidenced by its widespread use in aromatherapy.‘Phenomenal’ is a hardy cultivar that stands up to both humid heat and cold winters – it will thrive in Zones 5-9.Mint is bright, peppery, and full of zing – the perfect flavor to cool things down when spring starts to heat up.It’s used as a key ingredient in the Middle Eastern dish tabbouleh, is often served with lamb, and is used to make refreshing North African style mint tea.The leaves of the plant can also be dried and used to make homemade herbal teas with a variety of ingredients from the garden.Mint is hardy in Zones 3-8, where it will thrive with full sun to partial shade, well-drained soil, and irrigation with 1-2 inches of water per week.If you want your own fresh supply of this herb for making mint juleps or refreshing herbal teas, you can find spearmint for purchase in packs of seeds, or sets of three plants, at Burpee.It mixes well with lemon juice, as in tabbouleh, where it joins mint and tomatoes in a veritable celebration of flavor.By the way, there’s a recipe over at our sister site Foodal for an einkorn-crust pizza that uses parsley pesto as a saucy base.Parsley should be grown in full sun, but it will tolerate partial shade, and prefers rich, well-drained soil.Parsley is a cold hardy biennial that can grow up to 2 feet tall, depending on the variety.However, rosemary has a more common place in kitchens and cookbooks than lavender, with a taste reminiscent of both pine and lemon.When you have large, established plants, you can snip some of their sturdier branches to use as fragrant skewers for grilling your favorite vegetables or protein.You’ll find packs of three ‘Tuscan Blue’ rosemary plants for purchase at Burpee.A low-growing herb, thyme is a perennial that is delicious in the kitchen, and works beautifully as a ground cover.Most varieties reach 6-10 inches in height, making thyme an excellent choice as a live edging.Yes, you’re now ready to let the good thymes, and mints, and basils roll from your very own herb patch right into your kitchen and onto your plate this spring.Just remember to pick a good location with plenty of sunlight, well-draining soil, and use the gardening method that will work best for you.My spring herb garden is stocked with chives, mint, dill, and cilantro, some of my favorite aromatics to use in meals

What Herbs To Plant In Same Container

What Herbs To Plant In Same Container

There’s nothing better than enjoying a fresh bunch to add flavor to even the blandest of dishes.Herbs can also be grown by people who don’t have enough space for a garden bed.However, mixing different kinds in a single pot is not as easy as it sounds.There is a general rule of thumb for knowing what herbs can be planted together: Make sure any herbs planted together have the same needs – lots of water and sun or maybe less water and more shade.Just make sure you know one’s specific growing requirements and group them by their needs.If you’re a beginning gardener, you definitely will want to add fresh herbs to your planting plans.Not only does basil add a fresh taste to your pasta, but it also repels unwanted pests.To answer the question of what herbs grow well with basil, basil is a great companion planting to a wide variety of the best herbs and good companion plants like parsley, rosemary, oregano, and chili.Since it can repel harmful insects as well as mosquitoes, a lot of herbs can benefit greatly from having it planted in close proximity to lots of sunlight with good drainage.Cilantro is an excellent choice for beginner gardeners to start with.This type of herb is also known as Mexican parsley, and cilantro thrives during the cool season.It makes the perfect companion to mint herbs, basil, lavender, and dill.It can also share the same bed as tomatoes, carrots, strawberries, and cabbage.Chives not only pair great with many dishes, but they also grow well with many plants.These herbs can ward off pests like aphids and enhance the growth of other plants.Dill is another herb that attracts beneficial insects like honey bees, ladybugs, and butterflies to your garden bed.It discourages the presence of garden pests like spider mites, aphids, and cabbage loopers.That way, you can grow your experiences and your knowledge of spices in cooking with different varieties of culinary herbs.You can also grow an abundance of hardy herbs in rich soil right outside your own kitchen door.I put the products I use, in my posts and Youtube Gardening videos, there

What Herbs Go Well With Basil

What Herbs Go Well With Basil

There is also Thai Basil, which has a much stronger anise scent and is used in many Asian dishes.It is believed that it is best to tear basil leaves rather than chop them as the metal from the knife can alter the taste.In this salad, basil leaves are layered over tomato slices and mozzarella cheese and lightly drizzled with olive oil.Add basil to this Quick and Rich Tomato Soup for a classic dish.A good way to use basil is to infuse your favorite olive oil with it.Add fresh basil leaves, 3 at a time, and fry for 20-25 seconds, or until crisp.Pesto is a sauce made with basil, olive oil, garlic, some type of nuts such as pine nuts or walnuts and sometimes lemon and Parmesan cheese, all blended into a thick, green paste.Basil paired with balsamic vinegar, olive oil and garlic makes a savory, delicious vinaigrette that is perfect on salads, pasta and veggies.Combine ½ cup chopped fresh basil leaves, 2 Tbs.Slowly blend in up to ½ cup olive oil until you have your desired consistency.Add ¼ cup fresh chopped basil, 2 minced garlic cloves and 2 tsp.Whisk in up to ½ cup olive oil and season with salt and pepper to taste.An amazing way to enjoy balsamic vinegar with basil is to macerate strawberries with them.In a large bowl, mix together 4 cups of sliced or halved strawberries, 2 Tbs.Toss it all together and let the strawberries sit at room temperature until they release their juices, about 30 minutes.Eat as is or serve the berries inside sweet crepes or over pound cake, ice cream or waffles.You can simply slice fruit, sprinkle a bit of sugar and grated ginger over them and garnish with torn basil leaves.Make a Raw Fruit Tartlet and add some finely chopped basil to the mix.Drizzle with olive oil, if desired and top with Vegan Almond Feta for a delicious salad.Saute 2 minced garlic cloves and a pinch of red pepper flakes in olive oil in a skillet over medium heat.When the garlic is fragrant, add 2 zucchini and 2 yellow squash cut into coins and cook over medium-high heat until they are golden brown, about 20 to 25 minutes.Other herbs that pair well with basil are cilantro, chives, marjoram, oregano, parsley, rosemary and thyme.Basil and lemon pair well together and add a bright, refreshing taste to any dish.Spice up this Tofu “Shrimp” Scampi by adding ½ cup chopped fresh basil and 1 Tbs.Add ½ cup torn basil leaves and the lemon zest to the saucepan and let it sit for 30 minutes.Add 1 ½ cups of cold water and pour the mixture into an 8-inch baking dish.Serve the granita in chilled bowls and garnish each with a fresh basil leaf.Add 1 large eggplant cut into cubes to the pan and toss to coat with the oil.My Ratatouille Stew is not only healthy, hearty and delicious, but it contains 12 foods that work well with basil.Cover pot, reduce heat to medium low, and cook the vegetables down, stirring occasionally, until the eggplant has softened, about 10 to 15 minutes.Add 3 cups diced tomatoes and with a wooden spoon, scrape up all the yummy bits on the bottom of the pot.chopped fresh parsley and 1 ½ cups cooked chickpeas, and heat through.People actually make peanut butter and jelly sandwiches with fresh basil leaves.For dessert, have these Basil and Peanut Butter Cookies with Chili Coconut Ice Cream

How Do I Make My Herb Garden Successful

How Do I Make My Herb Garden Successful

Fruits and veggies get all the attention when it comes to growing food, but herbs provide the kick that you need to take a recipe from “meh” to amazing.After all, it’s a big difference from growing a basil plant in a pot by a window to having an entire garden dedicated to herbs.We’ll get you started by helping you decide what to plant and how to avoid the most common – and costly – mistakes.Have you ever purchased fresh herbs from the grocery store specifically for a recipe you’re about to make?They also tend to go bad rapidly unless you’re taking extra special care to avoid spoilage.Fresh herbs are more aromatic and deliver a bigger punch of flavor.The choice is up to you, but don’t forget to check out the common mistakes section below for some guidelines on how to choose the best growing container for your plants.Most herbs adore sunshine, so pick a spot that gets a generous amount of sun daily.For instance, a giant parsley plant can provide shade for low-growing sweet woodruff.Do you mind trekking to the far edge of your yard for a basil leaf when dinnertime beckons?Some folks won’t mind a bit, but others might prefer to have their herb garden close to home.Whatever you do, make sure it’s accessible enough that you can keep a close eye on it and can continually harvest an endless supply of yummy spices and medicines.In my garden, you won’t find sage or rosemary even though they’re easy to grow in my climate.I suggest picking a mix of annuals and perennials to start your herb garden.Here are a few examples of common herbs that are bound to be easy to find at your local nursery.There are certain kinds of oregano, for instance, that are hardy in my zone (5b) while others will die back when frost arrives.If you’re overwhelmed by the amount of choice available, it might be worth thinking about creating a theme for your herb garden.Choose herbs that are known for their medicinal qualities if you’re interested in natural remedies.Instead of picking herbs according to a specific palate, choose varieties with attractive blooms to encourage pollinators to visit your garden.Pick herbs and plants that are suitable for tea-making, so you’ll always have something on hand for when your throat gets a little sore, or when you want a cup of warm comfort.You can choose to start seedlings and go the ‘from scratch route,’ but I don’t recommend it for beginners.It’s also a pain to start annuals from seed and watch them die in the winter.I like to make a rough sketch of my garden area and then plan out what herbs I want to place and where, while also keeping in mind the mature height and width of the plants.Mix some garden soil, sand and/or moss into your existing earth.I like to plant annuals like cilantro in succession every few weeks, so I have a constant supply all year.Watch for weeds and evict them before they overtake your garden and keep a close eye on potential pests so you can get rid of them quickly should they strike.While herbs aren’t any more challenging to grow than the tomato plants in your vegetable garden or the rose bushes in your front yard, the trouble is that many people tend to plant different herbs together and treat them as one and the same.Make sure to note how much fertilizer your particular plants prefer and don’t assume that all herbs want the same amount.I asked some friends and social media followers if they had any nagging questions or issues they needed addressed when it came to herb gardening.I was surprised by how many folks had run into issues when trying to grow an herb garden.Those beautiful herb baskets at the farmer’s market are so tempting, aren’t they?A bushel of aromatic herbs in a basket that’s bursting at the seams with loamy soil and fresh smelling plants.If you let weeds creep into the garden, it will stunt the growth of your plants, so stay diligent.If you’re growing indoors and can’t find an appropriately sunny windowsill, opt for LED lighting to keep your herbs happy.Parsley, sweet woodruff and mint are good examples of herbs that don’t require as much light.I see countless Pinterest posts that show cute little herb gardens consisting of small containers.You don’t need to plant herbs in large barrels, but a roomy container is necessary for longevity.Otherwise, you’ll get a few weeks worth of life from your new fragrant friend and eventually it will start to look worse for wear.Some herbs are available in dwarf varieties and can survive in miniature containers, but generally, a pot should be at least 6-inches in diameter, and that’s the bare minimum.It may prefer a deep container instead of a wide shallow one (parsley, for instance, has a long taproot).When you head to your local nursery, the pots the herbs are sold in are too small.If you overwater or if it rains too much a good pot will allow water to flow to the bottom without soaking and rotting the roots of your plant.Going the DIY route and making an indoor herb garden with whatever pots you have on hand?Use rocks or pottery shards to fill the bottom of the container to help with drainage.Wondering why your effort to grow herbs is ending up in seed pods and tall stalks?To prevent rapid growth and encourage a bushy habit, be sure to prune your herb plants regularly.The more your pick off stems and leaves the longer your herb plant will remain in its production cycle.Folks also tend to panic when they notice a plant isn’t looking well and assume the issue is lack of water.In fact, some herbs prefer dryer soil and do not like humid, moist environments.It makes it easier to separately water, fertilize, and care for each type of plant.You can take in your pots when cold weather strikes and save annual herbs from frost damage.Getting started on an herb garden isn’t too tricky once you have the know-how, and a little preparation will save you a ton of time and money in the long run

What Is The Best Soil For Raised Beds

What Is The Best Soil For Raised Beds

This is especially advantageous for those whose property has hard-packed or clay soil, issues with tree roots, or concerns about pollutants.And since good soil is the foundation of a healthy garden, you want to make sure you’re setting your veggies up for success.The soil in a raised bed will remain loose and friable, rather than being hard-packed over time by footsteps.When I built my raised beds, I called around and ordered what I thought would be a good-quality triple mix.In Ontario where I live, triple mix is generally top soil, compost, and peat moss or black loam.All that rich organic matter is an important component that will hold moisture and provide nutrients to your plants.Topping up your beds with compost will add nutrients back into the soil to prepare it for whatever you plant next.To maintain the health of even the best soil for a raised garden bed, adding organic matter every year is essential.I find the soil levels in my raised beds are usually lower from the weight of the snow.If you have smaller containers to fill, check out Jessica’s recipes in her DIY potting soil article

What Time Of Day Should I Water The Garden

What Time Of Day Should I Water The Garden

When the warmer weather strikes, our gardens and outdoor spaces become a perfect oasis for rest and relaxation.All living things need water to allow chemical reactions in their cells that provide energy for growth.In high light levels, on sunny days, a lot of carbon dioxide is fixed to make sugars by photosynthesis.If plants run short of water they shut down their stomata and photosynthesis stops and is replaced by photorespiration – a process that releases carbon dioxide.Desert plants get around this by breathing at night and storing carbon dioxide for release to photosynthesis during the day while the stomata are shut.Some plants survive drought by dying down below ground – this is the case with garden bulbs such as bluebells, daffodils, tulips and snowdrops.The notion that wet leaves on sunny days cause scorch in plants was disproved nearly ten years ago.So water plants thoroughly but occasionally – and don’t let the soil completely dry out because it becomes harder to wet at that stage.A bit of mulch (wood chips or compost) can protect the soil and keep moisture in – but beware of slugs

Which Herbs Grow Best From Seed

Which Herbs Grow Best From Seed

It’s easy to do, fun, and allows me to grow plenty of plants for my raised beds and herb pots.Step 2: Gather your containers – I like to start seeds with plastic cell packs and trays, which I reuse for several years and then recycle.– I like to start seeds with plastic cell packs and trays, which I reuse for several years and then recycle.For more information about seed starting with a sunny window versus grow-lights, check out this post.Step 6: Water – Keep the soil evenly moist, but not sopping wet until the seeds germinate.– Once my seedlings are a few weeks old, I apply a diluted solution of an organic water soluble fertilizer to promote healthy growth.I grow both curly and flat-leaved parsley with both sown around ten weeks before the last expected spring frost.The plants form large clumps of grassy, onion-flavored leaves that are topped with rounded purple flowers in late spring.If you wish to start them yourself, sow seeds indoors under grow lights ten to twelve weeks before the last frost.Lesser known than basil and parsley, lemon balm is one of my favorite culinary herbs to start from seed.Cover the small seeds with a thin layer of potting mix and keep moist until germination.Once the risk of frost has passed, move the plants outdoors to a sunny or partially shaded location and harvest the lemon flavored and scented leaves for tea, seafood dishes, curries, sauces, and vinaigrettes.There are several excellent types or oregano to grow in gardens and containers and all should be started indoors in late winter.For a non-stop supply of high-quality dill greens, succession plant fresh seeds in the garden every three to four weeks from mid-spring until mid-summer.In regions with very short seasons you can also start dill seeds indoors six weeks before the last frost.It doesn’t transplant well, however, and is quick to grow so I prefer to direct sow in my garden beds.Quick growing cilantro is generally direct sown in garden beds and containers.To avoid bolting, plant bolt-resistant varieties like Calypso and grow in spring and fall when the weather is cooler.A popular tea herb, chamomile plants grow up to two-feet tall with hundreds of small, daisy-like blooms that have an appealing apple fragrance.Summer savory is an essential culinary herb in my kitchen, used liberally in soups, meatloaf, dressing and stuffing.Some, like rosemary and thyme are very slow to grow, while others, like most mint varieties don’t come true to type from seed.Here are five herbs I prefer to buy as seedlings at my local garden centre in spring rather than grow them from seed.Therefore, I save myself time and frustration and pick up a collection of rosemary plants from my local nursery.It’s moderately difficult to grow from seed requiring up to a month to germinate when started indoors.If you do wish to start your own lavender seeds, plant them indoors under grow-lights ten to twelve weeks before the last spring frost date.Providing bottom heat with a seeding mat can speed up and increase germination rates.It’s notoriously slow to grow from seed and likely won’t be large enough to provide a harvest until its second year.It is a perennial, hardy to zone 4, and needs to be started indoors at least fourteen to sixteen weeks before the last expected spring frost.If you do wish to grow common mint from seed (note that it offers less flavor than most other varieties), it’s actually quite easy to do.Sow seeds indoors ten weeks before the last frost, planting them 1/4 inch deep.Each spring I plant two lemon verbena seedlings in a big pot and they grow three to four feet tall, providing me with plenty of leaves to dry for winter teas

Should Herb Gardens Be In Full Sun

Should Herb Gardens Be In Full Sun

Herbs gardening has become increasingly popular, as people put more and more focus on nutritious, delicious, and fresh meals.Most common garden plants like iris, sunflowers, marigolds, Joe Pye weed, and even sweet peppers make it onto someone's list.If you want to dye yarn, or make ointments or potpourri or cook like a chef, you'll want to grow plants to suit that need.Some of the highly scented perennial herbs, such as lavender and sage, are useful in flower borders to discourage deer and rabbits.However, for the occasional use and for the sheer luxury of having their gorgeous scent nearby, small potted herbs are a delight.Mediterranean herbs, such as lavender and oregano, thrive in full sun, slightly lean soil and toasty warm temperatures.Lots of sunshine: It’s the combination of sun and slightly lean soil that seems to cause the essentials oils, and therefore the fragrance and flavor of the herbs, to intensify.Regular water, but with good drainage: Few plants enjoy having their roots in wet or continually damp soil.Many herbs from the Mediterranean area, like rosemary, oregano, thyme, and lavender, are drought tolerant, but that doesn’t mean you should allow them to languish in dry heat.Even woody perennial herbs like rosemary, lavender, and sage, will grow fuller and have less weak, dead wood if pruned at least once a year.Once a good root system is established some woody herbs like rosemary and lavender can even be pruned into small shrubs.This will help you decide where to place your plants and how to care for them to insure many seasons of enjoyment from your flavorful and aromatic herbs

What Herbs Can My Chickens Eat

What Herbs Can My Chickens Eat

Just like humans, wild birds have been observed gathering herbs for their nest or sampling them straight from your garden.Herbs that are definitely on the “good” list include oregano, thyme, parsley, basil, mint, dill, sage, marjoram, lavender, calendula, comfrey, cilantro, garlic, tarragon and so many more.You can give the herbs to your chickens fresh for eating by either hanging a bunch and letting them pick at it, or by mixing it into their feed.Hanging mint around your coop alone does not make for an effective pest management system, but it can be part of it.The smell also has a calming, de-stressing effect, making it a great choice to add to nest boxes or dust bathing areas.Mint can act as a natural insect & rodent deterrent, because they dislike the strong smell.Chop fresh oregano leaves and mix it into the chicken feed or hang bunches in the run for them to pick at.Sitting on a nest can leave hens open to predator attacks so their instincts are telling them to be alert despite them being safe in their coop.Stressed hens don’t lay well & you want to make them feel safe in their nest boxes.Adding lavender leaves or flowers to the nest boxes can act as a natural stress reliever.It will grow best in well drained, slightly alkaline soil and does great in raised beds or containers.Strain the leaves and add 4-5 tsp of beeswax pellets and about 20 drops of rosemary essential oil (optional).When I accidentally leave my garden gate open, the first thing my ducks & chickens run to is the comfrey!Very easy to grow and a perennial that will come back each year, it can be a little tricky to find at your local nursery.It’s anti inflammatory properties make the salve a good fit for treating a prolapsed vent or helping an egg bound hen.Thyme –Most aromatic herbs make great insect repellents because bugs dislike the strong smell.Thyme bundles hung around the run or sprinkled in the nest boxes are a great way to keep pests at bay

How To Make A Little Herb Garden

How To Make A Little Herb Garden

The addition of freshly picked home-grown herbs to your cooking will boost flavours in a way nothing else can, and there's fun to be had experimenting with a range of varieties in different dishes.You don't even need to be green-fingered and raise everything from seed – garden centres are full of potted herb plants, and you can also make use of supermarkets.Keep potted herbs healthy with regular doses of liquid seaweed feed, and remember to harvest by pinching out the top tips, just above a pair of leaves, which will encourage bushy new growth.Lemon and golden varieties look lovely in pots, while creeping thymes release a wonderful scent if you plant them between gaps in paving where they may be stepped on (although you might not want to eat them after that).TIP: Bunch herbs with an elastic band as you harvest them, then simply snip straight into your dish.Scatter a thin layer on a tray of compost, then water and cover with a disposable shower cap.Place on a warm, sunny windowsill to germinate, and take off the shower cap the minute they start to sprout.Flat-leaf and curly parsley are resilient and will keep going well into autumn, and even into winter if you put a cloche over to protect from the coldest weather.The flowers are beautiful in salads, and you can even eat the roots – just wash off the soil, chop and add to curries.Steer clear of the packets of pre-cut herbs in supermarkets (they are often imported with high food miles) and instead opt for pots, which tend to be British-grown.This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses

How To Make A Small Outdoor Herb Garden

How To Make A Small Outdoor Herb Garden

And they have a quality about them they makes you want to bake from scratch, buy organic and pour good wine.This DIY herb garden project takes a little bit of handy work with tools but we just love it!Plant herbs in pots in the ground, like they did in this garden in France, courtesy of ‘Townmouse‘.Easy idea for a quick outdoor herb garden, that doesn’t lack any charm, from ‘Precious Sister‘.This kitchen herb garden is the perfect back porch decor, and yet, it makes sure the parsley is right their when you are cooking Sunday night soup this fall!Lina at ‘Fancy Frugal Life‘ made these DIY stacked outdoor herb gardens, complete with chalkboard markers!Try this DIY hanging herb garden by ‘Homemade Modern‘, made from pine boards, rope and zip ties!I’d love these herb garden containers hung on porches, decks and even in trees!Cottage Style Herb Garden By ‘Marian St Clair‘

What Herbs Repel Garden Pests

What Herbs Repel Garden Pests

While scientific research may not always agree with the folklore surrounding companion planting, at the very least it adds diversity in the garden, which itself may cut back on problems and increase yields.Garlic deters Japanese beetles but when planted too close to anything in the pea and bean family it will inhibit their growth.Beneficial insects are considered the good guys and are the best reason not to spray insecticides at random.Because insects tend to have different feeding requirements during the various stages of their development, a diversity of plant material is essential to attracting them.Planting a small bed of Zinnias in the vegetable garden will bring in pollinators which also helps to increase yields from beans, squash, vine fruits such as melons, and cucumbers.The trees, shrubs, and weeds would leaf out sooner in the spring than cultivated crops and provide early food sources.Hedgerows are rare today, but you could easily plant a mixed border of fruiting and flowering trees, shrubs, and perennials that have something in bloom all season.Composite flowers (daisy and chamomile) and mints (spearmint, peppermint, or catnip) to attract predatory wasps, hoverflies, and robber flies.rosemary, sage Flea beetle: mint, catmint (contains nepetalactone, an insect repellent, and can be steeped in water and sprayed on your plants).mint, catmint (contains nepetalactone, an insect repellent, and can be steeped in water and sprayed on your plants) Flies: basil, rue.marigold (should be established for at least one year before their nematode deterring properties will take effect) Squash bugs and beetles: nasturtium, tansy.lavender (also thought to repel mice and moths) Tomato hornworm: borage, pot marigold

Best Way To Plant Herbs In The Garden

Best Way To Plant Herbs In The Garden

Creating a herb garden is an easy way to teach young children how to grow their own food.Many herbs are easy to grow and have fragrant leaves, providing additional interest to young minds.Encourage your kids to plant the herbs with you, and label them with lollipop sticks so they know what they’re growing.Then, simply cook meals that require fresh herbs as ingredients – your children will be hooked for life.If your children are looking for a longer project, try growing annual herbs such as parsley, coriander and basil from seed.These require warmer temperatures than the perennial herbs and can bolt (flower) if not watered regularly or given too much sun.Ideally, cover the pot with a clear plastic bag or similar, to create a ‘mini greenhouse’.Large container with drainage holes to plant them in, or a dedicated patch of garden.For growing in both pots and the ground, aim to plant the herbs a hand's width apart.Plant your herbs in the right spot – too much sun can cause basil, parsley and coriander to flower and seed, which stops them producing delicious leaves.However, oregano, mint, chives and rosemary thrive in sun, so are best planted in a sunnier spot.Sow seeds of annual herbs every two-three weeks so you have a continuous crop throughout summer