Most potted plants such as the Sunshine & Joy Garden can survive in the ground, but only if the conditions are right.It doesn’t hurt to let the plant adapt to the change by setting it outside in its pot for a few days prior to transplanting.And make sure the ground is dry enough; moist soil is great, but digging in mud will result in rock-hard clumps.You generally don’t want to pull the plant out, especially from a larger pot, as it may rip out part of the root system.If the plant has been in the pot for a long time, the roots will start to wrap around and match the shape of the container.You don’t want to bury the plant itself, so if the hole is too deep, you can scoop a few handfuls of dirt in to provide a base.You don’t want to pack the soil too tightly, but it needs to be solid enough to support the plant and hold the roots in place.Though you can use it to raise a new plant, there are many other creative uses for old flower pots—from cute fairy gardens, to practical de-icing salt dispensers, to kitchen utensil holders. .

How to Transplant Herbaceous Garden Plants

Plant foliage is transpiring moisture rapidly during warm weather, and transplanting at this time can be very stressful.If you are buying seedlings or potted plants from a nursery, it's actually better to choose specimens that are not yet in full bloom, as they often transplant more successfully.If you must move a plant during the summer months, try to do it on a cool, cloudy day—or at least late in the day while the sun is less intense and temperatures are cooler.A few minutes researching a particular species to learn its likes and dislikes can go along way toward ensuring it survives the move and thrives in its new location. .

Successful Transplanting

Gardeners love to move plants around as they get bigger or to make room for new additions, but there are a few tricks that the average or even more experienced ‘scaper should know about when and how to move plants so that they grow their best in their new location.Be sure to check out these tips and product recommendations before you begin any garden re-furbishment project.Don't dig the hole too much deeper than the root ball of the transplant.Use your best guess for the size -- you can always make adjustments once you have dug up the plant.For larger trees or shrubs, consider getting a tarp to lay the transplant on and ask a friend for help lifiting -- even for medium sized shrubs, the root ball will be quite large and heavy with soil.You can use Soil Moist it helps retain moisture to the needy roots of the plant.Sources: Kenneth C. Roth, MCH and Northeast Nursery Staff.

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How to move or transplant garden plants and shrubs

Early spring or autumn is the perfect time of year to move things around in your garden.Before you start ripping all your garden up, there is a catch: you can’t move plants that have been established for a long time.Acers, cornus, roses, sorbus, camellias, peonies, fruit trees, azaleas, forsythia and rhododendron will all cope better in autumn.Grasses, evergreen plants, late-flowering varieties should be moved in spring, such as box, asters, miscanthus, pennisetum, sarcococca, crocosmia and kniphofia.I always give plants I’m moving a bit of a prune to compensate for the fact that their root system may have been damaged or diminished.When the weather warms and the plant starts growing again, add a little general purpose fertiliser to give the roots a kick-start. .

Why and How to Transplant Tomatoes (a Second Time) – Garden

We’re more than a month into growing tomatoes, and while they can technically graduate to the garden by now, I prefer to transplant them into larger pots one more time.Why wouldn’t I just start my tomatoes in large pots, and let the roots grow unbound until they’re ready to go in the ground?If you live in an area with high humidity or you’re prone to overwatering your tomato plants, you may have seen the bumps turn white and become more prominent.By partially burying the tomato stem when you transplant a second time, you’re anchoring the plant more firmly in the soil and encouraging even more roots to form.Having a deeper, greater mass of roots helps your tomato plant be more resilient against wind, drought, pests, and diseases.Doing so builds up a bigger and stronger root system, as their vigorous taproots can grow up to 1 inch per day.So if you’re moving from a 4-inch pot to the next size up, wait until your plant is 12 inches tall so there’s enough stem length to bury.If you’re growing tomatoes in the ground, plant them at least 18 to 24 inches apart (more space is always better for proper air circulation).If your young plants are already loaded with blossoms, however, they stand a better chance of surviving a transplant if you remove all the flowers and fruit first.They don’t have to be disinfected first (in fact, I advocate for not washing plant pots), but they should be clean and free of disease.I recommend mixing your potting soil with compost, or stirring in a granular tomato fertilizer before you plant (following the package instructions).With your fingers or a pair of garden scissors, pinch off the lowest two or three branches of leaves, especially if they’re wilting or yellowing.New branches, leaves, and roots continue to grow throughout its lifespan, but a tomato plant usually only has one main stem.Give the pot a good final shake and add more soil as needed to stabilize the stem.Tomato plants like to be slightly dry in between watering and they will not tolerate being overwatered, so try to keep the moisture level consistent.When your plants have grown two to three times the size of their pots, you can transplant them in the garden, again pinching off the lowest branches and sinking the stems deeper into the soil.They’ll be pretty tall so a transplanting trick to save your back (from digging all day!).I recommend mixing your potting soil with compost, or stirring in a granular tomato fertilizer before you plant (following the package instructions).With your fingers or a pair of garden scissors, pinch off the lowest two or three branches of leaves, especially if they're wilting or yellowing.Give the pot a good final shake and add more soil as needed to stabilize the stem.Tomato plants like to be slightly dry in between watering and they will not tolerate being overwatered, so try to keep the moisture level consistent.When your plants have grown two to three times the size of their pots, you can transplant them in the garden, again pinching off the lowest branches and sinking the stems deeper into the soil. .

How to Repot Container Plants

In my former job as a greenhouse manager, I spent a lot of time repotting container plants.Telltale signs include soil that dries out quickly or has become degraded; roots tightly packed within a pot or protruding from drainage holes; and water sitting on the soil surface too long after watering.Black, dark-colored, or foul-smelling roots are usually signs of a serious problem, such as fungal disease.The second step is to get a plant out of its pot.Put your other hand on the bottom of the pot and use a downward throwing motion with an abrupt stop.Use a sharp knife or pruning shears for this job, removing as much as the bottom third of the root ball if necessary.If you use a pot shard, place it convex side up to avoid sealing the hole.To repot a small plant that’s easy to lift, put a few inches of moist soil in the pot and tamp it down lightly.I’ve noticed that there are two approaches to this job — “stuffing” and “filling.” Stuffers like to press soil in around a plant. .

How to move a plant in flower (if you must)

They grow taller than I thought, or bloom earlier than I remember – it’s either that or I am just fickle, because I stand outside and look upon my garden and think, “It would look so much lovelier if that was not right there but a bit further back.”.This ensures that the soil around the plant is saturated with moisture, and it helps no end.If you need to move it before the next spot is ready, keep it in a tub trug with a little water and soil at the bottom.They need lots of water to produce nectar, so they are stealing a resource that goes into making new roots.If you find you don’t get a lot of roots, reduce the top growth of the plant.Add a good layer of garden compost as a mulch around the plant. .

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