It's also important to read plant tags and make sure a perennial, shrub or tree can survive winters in your USDA Hardiness Zone (find yours here).So, embrace the challenges, enjoy the surprises, and read on to discover great garden plants and layout ideas for your own backyard. .

15 Garden Layout Ideas for Your Yard

Whether you have a small backyard or courtyard or you just want to create a space for dining near the house, one of the best ways to close off an area without making it feel claustrophobic is to use lattice. .

Vegetable Garden Layout: 7 Best Design Secrets! – A Piece Of

Vegetable Garden Layout: 7 Best Design Secrets!7 best vegetable garden layout ideas on soil, sun orientations, spacing, varieties, plans & design secrets to create productive & beautiful kitchen gardens.Start with sun and shade when creating vegetable garden layout and designs.Most vegetables grow best in full sun.Always choose the most sunny location you can for a kitchen garden, where plants can get at least 5-6 hours of direct sun per day, especially between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m.

Usually the south, south west, or south east side of a house is great for a veggie garden on northern hemisphere.A good alternative is to plant shorter plants such as cabbage, onion, or zucchini on the south side of a garden bed, and taller plants such as pole bean, fava bean, tomato etc on the north side so the taller plants won’t shade the shorter plants.Well designed beds and paths in vegetable garden layout.A well designed vegetable garden layout needs to have good circulation paths.If you want more edible garden beds ideas, check out this reader favorite article on how to build 28 easy and productive raised beds!How to space vegetables in a garden.When you are designing what to plant in your vegetable garden, it’s important to know how far to space vegetables in a garden bed.This is for intensive plantings with good soil in small space or raised beds.Use trellis & structures in a vegetable garden layout.They can also be really beautiful in an edible garden.When planning your garden, it’s a good idea to incorporate companion planting. .

Free Interactive Garden Design Tool

Plan-A-Garden lets you create design plans for anything from a patio container garden to a welcoming front walk to your whole yard. .

11 Garden Planners and Programs

After you've planned your garden, many of the planners let you print out or save your garden layout, including a list of supplies you'll need to buy to implement your design. .

8 Landscape Design Principles

Landscape Design Principles for Residential Gardens Eight rules for creating a satisfying garden that is neither fussy nor constraining By Rob Steiner Share:.However, after 28 years and hundreds of projects later, I’ve come to believe in certain rules and guidelines that are neither fussy nor constraining.Applied by any gardener, amateur or professional, they will result in a more successful, satisfying design.Let’s start with two rules that can kick-start the process of laying out a landscape, then move on to guidelines that help in scaling the proportions of a garden’s elements and, finally, to choosing and using the right plants.Of course, there are times when the point of a landscape design is a monumental sense of scale or view, but the best gardens, whatever their size, modulate a feeling of enclosure and openness, and this rule will help.“A regulating line,” wrote the great architect (and theoretician) Le Corbusier, “is an assurance against capriciousness…It confers on the work the quality of rhythm…The choice of a regulating line fixes the fundamental geometry of the work....”.The decking on a different project in Pacific Palisades, CA, creates a regulating line that is parallel to the plane create by the gray wall of the house in the upper right of the image.First is the idea of underlying order: that the garden, for all its naturalness, or wildness, is founded on strong principles—what’s sometimes known in garden circles as “good bones.” Second, that regulating lines—at least as I employ them—are subjective; it’s the designer who identifies and manipulates them to create the garden.And I’d say that the use of the regulating line, more than any other concept, separates professional from amateur design.One is the Golden Ratio which is a ratio of proportion that’s been observed in everything from the Great Pyramids at Giza to the Greek Parthenon and has been used throughout history as a guide to a pleasing sense of balance and order.The practical application that I make of the Golden Ratio involves its sibling, the Golden Rectangle, in which the ratio of the short side to the long side is equal to the ratio of the long side to the sum of both sides (a/b = b/a+b)—you probably didn’t know that landscape architects had to learn math.Numerically, the Golden Rectangle ratio is close to 1: 1.6, a proportion I regularly use to lay out terraces, patios, arbors, and lawns.Another ratio may even be platinum: That’s what I’ve always called the rule for step design advocated by landscape architect Thomas D. Church, often credited with creating the California style.Using drifts on both sides of the walk reinforces a sense of mass planting.Maybe my favorite rule of all time, all the more charming for its need to be adjusted for inflation: It’s better to plant a 50-cent plant in a $5 hole, than a $5 plant in a 50-cent hole.And the range of prescriptions about how it should be done—from conventional wisdom such as planting tall plants in the back of the border and short ones in front, to the ironclad strictures of codes, covenants, and restrictions—will stir the rebel impulse in any creative soul.It was some years later—working first in a large office, then in a wonderful nursery where I got an intensive course in appropriate planting for Southern California—that I migrated towards residential garden design.Read about five more landscape design rules on LandscapingNetwork.com.Guide includes ideas for: Establishing focal points. .

Garden Layout Ideas

It may be a place to relax and unwind, a space for children and/or pets to play, and an area for growing as well as fruits,vegetables and flowers – all at the same time!Because of the multi-use requirement for the garden, it’s worth considering how plants can be protected from trampling, stray footballs, boisterous dogs and so on!Raised beds are often framed with wood, bricks or other materials, then filled with mixture of high-quality potting soil, compost and/or leaf mold.They drain well and are excellent for otherwise difficult areas such as stony, compacted, contaminated, very wet, or nutrient-poor soils.See free layouts for raised bed gardens—plus, beautiful garden photos!Many fresh herbs and vegetables taste much better when they’re freshly harvested and what could be more convenient than having them just outside the back door?What gives the kitchen garden its charm and appeal is the blend of vegetables, fruit, herbs and flowers that are grown together like a living tapestry.While homestead gardens may have some raised beds nearer to the house, most crops are grown in traditional in-ground rows.If your garden is small it’s important to make the best use of the space you have with clever planting techniques and the right crops.Prioritize crops by choosing to grow only those that you really enjoy eating or which are expensive to buy.Flowers also provide food and habitat for beneficial insects, and can help improve pollination of fruit and vegetable crops.Larger vegetables may also be used to protect smaller plants and seedlings from harsh winds or as a climbing support, while sprawling crops such as squashes can be used to suppress weeds around tall crops like corn.See our list of shade-tolerant vegetables plus sample garden plans located in partially shady spots.Visit our complete Gardening for Everyone hub, where you’ll find a series of guides—all free! .

16 Garden Design Ideas For Your Outdoor Space

Think about access and what you want to use your garden for – planting and growing veg, sunbathing, eating alfresco or simply sitting down to enjoy a cup of tea on a sunny morning?A metre or more in depth is a perfect size for a border, giving you enough space to put smaller plants at the front with taller ones behind.In this calm planting scheme, tall grasses combine with a riot of colourful pink and purple blooms.Remember, narrow, low-planted beds can define seating or dining areas, as can lines of planted-up troughs – choose evergreen scented plants, such as lavender or Mexican orange blossom.In terms of climbing plants, opt for an evergreen like clematis, which provides a beautiful and colourful display.Tony Woods recommends star jasmine for seating areas: 'It’s very well-behaved, produces masses of white, waxy, scented flowers throughout the summer and reacts well to being cut back, so is ideal for positioning behind a seating area where you don't want plants hanging over and can enjoy the scent.'.When you're choosing flowering plants, try to make some of them 'out of season' performers so you have some year-round colour, or put in spring and early summer bulbs to get the garden off to a great start.They block the glare of the sun and can also be used as an anchor for shade sails, a hammock, pendant lights or hanging decorations.Trees can also screen an unattractive view or help to filter noise and air pollution if you live near a busy road.And they benefit nature significantly, providing pollen for insects and shelter for birds, and converting airborne carbon dioxide into oxygen.The colour and style of your paving and the way it is laid can provide a strong design direction for the entire garden.For instance, grey or white stone laid in a random pattern will set the scene for a French country look; black or silver paving organised in a regular design will form the perfect backdrop to a sleek and modern scheme; while golden stone arranged in a mixed pattern creates an English country feel.Porcelain absorbs no water so requires less cleaning than traditional type of paving meaning less pressure washing and much less hard work when multiplied over future years.'.The richer rusty tones offset beautifully against the darker natural colours, bringing warmth and character to the surfaces of your garden.'By ensuring your paving is the same level as your indoor flooring, you can blur the lines between the interior and the exterior of the property,' adds Michael.If you don't like the idea of incorporating stone steps, you can achieve a seamless look with your existing lawn, for example, by enabling the flow from one space to the next.As seen in the below photo, garden designer Helen Elks-Smith used grass treads, integrating them into the existing lawn to connect the lower patio to the small sun terrace above.Environmentally friendly, anti-slip and maintenance-free, Millboard’s composite decking boards are an innovative mix of polyurethane and a mineral blend, offering the beauty and versatility of natural wood without the maintenance.Grey hanging egg chair from BRIQ includes water-resistant washable cushions, full height stand and durable long lasting steel base.If, for example, you can't move your three-piece set indoors over winter, buy furniture covers to protect and extend its life.And let's not forget other garden must-haves, including fire pits and chimineas, patio heaters, barbecues and pizza ovens – planning space for these is key, as is where they will be stored or protected once it's winter.This outdoor fireplace from Schiedel features natural volcanic pumice, providing insulation for a safe and spectacular centrepiece in the garden.Pumice is a natural insulator which means the fire not only heats up quickly but requires less fuel to reach an optimum temperature.In a small garden, boundary walls, fences or hedges may be the biggest element in view, so it's really important for them to look good.Carefully positioned within a garden, they can be used to frame plants or seating areas and add extra interest to borders or paths.They used reclaimed oak posts to frame the view along a meandering path at its centre, positioning them at different heights and angles so that new aspects of the space open up to visitors as they make their way through.'You can’t go wrong with hardy rose bushes or tall bamboo,' suggests Jon Holloway, founder of Garden Trading.Think about how you can turn your outdoor space into a relaxing sanctuary with cosy garden decor and tactile furnishings.Essentially you want to create a living room look, it's just outdoors rather than inside, so bear this in mind when on the hunt for decor and accessories.Reflect light around your chosen spot with a garden mirror; invest in a waterproof speaker; choose citronella candles to keep bugs at bay; keep warm in the evenings with a patio heater, and last but certainly not least, dot smaller potted plants around the space, much as you would with houseplants.Choose wisely as an ornament or water feature (although it's great for wildlife) that's plonked in the centre of an empty space is unlikely to look good.If it's too small it will look lost and something too big will overwhelm the space; the latter has also been known to devalue your home, so it's something to bear in mind when it's time to sell.A garden room is a great way to maximise and extend your space whether you want a home office or a yoga studio, and planning permission is not usually required.Living walls are becoming more popular in garden designs, providing a great way to embrace vertical planting and create maximum drama in your outdoor space.John Davies incorporated hydroponic walls into the roof and basement gardens of this office building in London.A mix of flowering shrubs and perennials, such as buddleia and fuschia, complements the evergreen planting framework and creates a year-round effect with seasonal colour.Using climbing plants and wall shrubs such as clematis, roses, honeysuckle or wisteria, will add a vertical element to your outside space.'Outdoor lights and a fire pit mean that you can continue to enjoy your space even when the sun sets or if the weather isn't quite what you hoped,' says Jon Holloway.Make use of fences and walls by planting upwards to maximise space and buy hanging baskets (these are great for front gardens too).For example, Adolfo Harrison created a hidden playground in this garden in east London, weaving elements of play throughout the design so that both children and adults can enjoy the space.Monkey bars form a pergola to which swings and slides can be attached, boulder stepping stones are laid out to enable children to jump from one to the other along the length of the garden, and two moon benches provide a snug place where they can sit, set within a living wall to create a playful face.While you would need to have a large garden to install a slide or playhouse, for more restricted spaces, sand tables or mud kitchen play sets in a corner will work great, and it will entertain kids for hours.Bee hotels, wildlife ponds, log piles, plants for pollinators and compost heaps will continue to increase in popularity.Enjoy House Beautiful magazine delivered straight to your door every month with Free UK delivery.This book is intended to give you inspiration and confidence to make the most of your garden, without being overwhelmed with unnecessary technical detail.YouTube gardening star Huw Richards shows how to guarantee early success by starting off young plants on a windowsill and suggests what to grow in each part of the bed.Clare Nolan reveals her secrets for growing a bountiful harvest as well as styling spectacular homegrown displays in this beautifully designed book.Discover organic techniques that improve biodiversity, learn the value of using recycled and reclaimed materials for landscaping, and take on simple projects such as making a pond and a wildlife hotel. .

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