How To Paint Outdoor Patio Cushions

How To Paint Outdoor Patio Cushions

This article on how to paint patio cushions and pillows shows a bright and cheery project, and I feel like we can all use a little bit more happy in the world right now.I had a little bit of Annie Sloane Chalk Paint in my favorite color, Provence, so I thought, what the heck?I’ll give a shout out to my friend Kim whose wildly popular article years ago about how to paint upholstery uses a little different method.What you are doing is thinning out the chalk paint so it soaks into the fabric but doesn’t become crusty.I would not recommend using a sponge applicator to paint patio cushions, since you have to apply a bit of force to work the pigment into the fabric.Here’s just a few seconds of video to show the technique for painting fabric on patio cushions or anything else.I’d need more coats, but I knew the color transformation on the white piping and blue fabric would both look good in the end.Don’t forget to paint the little tabs that tie the patio cushions to the chairs, if you have them, and the sides.The patio cushions aren’t scratch or crackly, and they don’t stick when you sit.This one additional step improves the comfort: use a fine-grit sandpaper to very gently knock down the paint on the fabric.Lightly sanding will give your fabric flexibility as it loosens the hold of the paint.I used the same sandpaper on the blue painted patio cushions and the ones below, and there was some unfortunate color transfer, seen as the white shadows on the photo below.However, I did spray with Thompson’s Water Seal on all sides, which didn’t make the cushions stiffer.I waited until the end of summer to let you know how it turned out, because I wanted to know if the paint stood up to the weather, and if they faded.This pair of outdoor pillows was also way beyond cleaning, and I wanted to see how painting would cover over a pattern.I had a tiny little bit of Annie Sloan Emperor’s Silk, and below you see it still wet, with only one coat

Best Electric Garden Patio Heaters

Best Electric Garden Patio Heaters

Popular throughout the American Sun Belt and other regions with relatively mild temperatures, outdoor heaters can take the edge off cold weather and keep the party going past the point when you would otherwise head indoors.So, while propane is considered a “cleaner” fuel than gas or coal, it’s often sourced through destructive environmental practices like fracking and underwater oil drilling.Propane heaters tend to produce more heat than electric ones because they aren’t limited to your home’s circuit system.But on the flip side, this means they have fewer safety features because they won’t shut off if the circuit becomes overloaded.The amount of fuel you will go through depends on the heat setting and surrounding air temperature, but plan to burn more the colder it gets.According to Amerigas, you can estimate that you’ll generate 22,000 Btu (British thermal units) of heat per hour per pound of propane burned.Not only does that leave you without the task of refilling empty propane tanks, but it offers the opportunity to tap into renewable energy if that’s what powers your home.When used for outdoor heaters, propane gets much hotter than electric heat, meaning you need to use less energy to achieve desired temperatures.On the flip side, it’s possible to power electric heaters off renewable energy sources like wind or solar.Like an indoor furnace, it warms the air immediately around it, meaning the heat can be easily lost with any amount of wind.A small porch won’t need a powerful heater, but a larger patio may be better served with a bigger unit or even two or three spaced throughout.Seek out models that have automatic shutoff valves, cool touch glass, and protection against tipping over.Small but mighty, this telescoping outdoor heater puts out impressive warmth, considering its operational capacity of 5,500 Btus.Operating at an impressive 90 percent heating efficiency, you’ll waste little energy using this heater outdoors—guaranteeing guilt-free outdoor gatherings.With this Briza infrared heater, you can switch between the convenience of portability with a tripod stand or mount the model on your wall or ceiling for hassle-free heating that’s entirely out of the way.And with an IP 55 rating, the Briza can operate smoothly in all elements, making it a viable heating strategy even in the midst of snowfall.It’s meant to be mounted permanently to an outdoor wall or ceiling to serve as a discrete heating source that doesn’t take up valuable square footage in your entertaining space.It boasts an impressive 38,500 Btus at maximum capacity and can heat 180 square feet of outdoor space.This modern heater won’t look out of place with the chicest patio furniture, ensuring that it brings the aesthetics of your entertainment space up a notch.This premium heater runs on a 20 or 30-lb propane tank (not included) and can operate in winds up to 7.5 miles an hour, which the company claims is more than twice its competitors.Standard safety features like a gas flow shutoff if the flame goes out or the heater tips ensure you can use it stress-free.Considered one of the best brands for off-grid outdoor heat, it’s the perfect size to warm four to five people sitting close.As with most outdoor heaters, it comes with an automatic safety shutoff function in case it tips over, as well as an oxygen depletion sensor.Forced air heaters tend to be a poor choice outdoors if you’re concerned about conservation, but this model from Hampton Bay still makes our list thanks to its heat-focusing reflectors.It’s powerful enough to heat 120 square feet of patio space and comes with a high-quality powder coating for durability despite the elements.Let’s not pretend otherwise—it’s a strange proposition to heat outdoor air using fossil fuels that are responsible for accelerating global warming in the first place.Choosing the smallest size that will work for your space, refraining from using it when you’re not right near it, and bundling up with extra clothing and blankets will all help you to stay warm without burning fossil fuels

What Kind Of Stain Do You Use For Outdoor Furniture

What Kind Of Stain Do You Use For Outdoor Furniture

Its origin of usage can be traced back to India close to 2 millennia ago, and it remains one of the most beloved materials.After World War II, it peaked in popularity in the US as Americans stationed overseas brought back teak items to decorate with.Most untreated woods will soon rot if it absorbs too much moisture, and the color will soon fade if it is exposed to consistent sunlight.Sealants sit on the surface and create a protective layer that prevents moisture from seeping into the wood.On the other hand, once you have properly applied teak sealer on your fence and sanded it sufficiently, you will be able to stain it to successfully give it a more appealing visual.There are countless benefits from adding a stain to teak wood fences and furniture, particularly items that are exposed to rain, sunshine, and temperature changes.Homeowners are highly encouraged to stain teak wood fences since they are constantly exposed to the harsh elements of nature.Constant contact with dirt, wind, rain, and UV rays can start to fade the wood’s natural tone, resulting in a dingy grey.In fact, the latest research concluded that people with outdoor spaces spend 14 hours a week on their patios, porches, and backyards!It is simply the optimal location to host guests or calm down with a bottle of wine to unwind from the day’s stresses.People with pets and small children also appreciate the peace of mind a solid fence offers – so keeping the wood in tip-top shape needs to be a priority.Usually, most homeowners will only consider staining a teak fence once it starts to look noticeably faded and used after years of exposure to the outdoors.The grey faded tone results from evaporated oil caused by exposure to UV rays.Staining a teak wood fence or furniture can be quite an arduous task, depending on the scope of your project.You will need to prep the wood, protect the surrounding area, and apply several coats of stain, which can take several days to complete.You can use mild dish soap and water along with a soft bristle brush to wash away any dirt and debris on the surface.When you hire a professional stainer, you should be advised on the best products and methods that should be undertaken based on the type of fence you have and its condition.Staining your teak wood fence or furniture can help to enhance its look and even change the style completely.Lighter colors are also best if the wood furniture or fence is in direct sunlight, as it won’t absorb heat as much as dark tones.Darker pigments tend to hold their color the best, lasting for up to 7 years on outdoor furniture and fences!Teak wood will eventually lose its natural oil content if it is unprotected and left in harsh weather conditions.In some cases, teak oil also encourages mold and mildew growth since it interferes with the wood’s natural moisture-resistant properties.It is best to avoid oiling your teak wood altogether and instead opt for staining and sealing for the ultimate protection.While you can stain teak wood on your own, you do run the risk of ruining your furniture or fence with a poor application.Wood stain must be applied evenly and smoothly, or you’ll get a blotchy result that won’t enhance your outdoor property at all.We provide outdoor wood restoration, refinishing, and staining services to the Southern California area

What Is The Best Patio Furniture Brand

What Is The Best Patio Furniture Brand

Here’s a pretty picture: the sun is shining in the sky, the grass around you is lush and green, you’ve got a sweet tea in hand and you’re about to lay back on your outdoor lounger with a good book.It’s as simple as an outdoor rug, a cute and comfy little sectional, a side table, and a lantern or two.Along the way, we’ll consider important factors such as materials, costs, storage solutions, style, and more to help you make the perfect choice.Brendan Burscough, the brand’s founder, had a clear vision: “to unclutter life by focusing on quality and detail, [with a] dedication to artisanal-level craftsmanship and use of the highest quality materials reflect the essence of minimalist design.”.The furniture is crafted in an artisan workshop with a meticulous attention to detail using environmentally conscious materials.It also blends traditional handmade tactics with modern equipment to produce the most high-quality furniture possible.Customer reviews detail how the brand helps shoppers reach their goals for every space with its selection of pieces.Testimonials explain how the fabrics and frames are durable and that these are long lasting pieces of furniture.Rove Concepts prices go for about $40 for smaller items like seat cushions and up to $8,749 for larger outdoor sofas.The two were on a mission to “bring beautiful, eco-friendly and affordable quality furniture directly to the consumer.”.Speaking of materials, you’ll find thick, plastic woven wicker, aluminum frames, and Sunbrella fabric cushions.The furniture was designed to be super functional and versatile, while also being sleek, stylish, and comfortable.After much success in the outdoor world, they also started manufacturing indoor pieces with the same mission in mind.The customer testimonials we did find comment on how easy the pieces are to mix and match since they all feature a similar wicker design, while also being sturdy and durable.Today, 70% of the products are manufactured in the US, using all-weather wicker and aluminum to ensure that lasting quality.While there isn’t too much talk online, we did find that shoppers love the classic designs and modern twists to every piece of furniture.Plus, the simple styles blend perfectly with pre-existing decor, making it easy to add the pieces to any space.When it comes to prices, be sure to check out retailers of the brand like Watson’s and Factory Direct Furniture.Though it was founded 150 years ago, Woodard pieces are still crafted in the same place it first began: Owosso, Michigan.The brand was created by Lyman E

Can Gel Stain Be Used Outdoors

Can Gel Stain Be Used Outdoors

If your furniture will be resting under a cover and not exposed to direct water, you may have a successful result

How To Level A Garden Before Laying A Patio

How To Level A Garden Before Laying A Patio

To level the ground for pavers, start by calling your local utility organization to see if there are any underground pipes or wires you'll need to avoid while digging.Using a shovel or rototiller, dig up the entire area so it's deep enough and add a base layer of gravel until you're about 3 inches from the slope line

Best Patio Garden Book

Best Patio Garden Book

Some are probably lucky enough to have access to community-based gardening resources—a grandfather, an aunt, a neighbor who could act as a mentor and pass down knowledge acquired through years of experience.In addition to providing a wealth of info for the inexperienced, the three of them also shared some of their favorite gardening and horticultural books—the ones they repeatedly recommend as resources for people interested in growing their own food.Darina Allen’s hefty tome combines technical knowledge on cultivating various fruits, vegetables, herbs, and other edible plants, with over 500 recipes that teach you how to cook and serve your bounty.For each major vegetable Allen includes comprehensive information on growing conditions, planting seasons, heirloom cultivars, and fertilization guides.Container Gardening Complete: Creative Projects for Growing Vegetables and Flowers in Small Spaces by Jessica Walliser.Thomas also likes Walliser’s book on container gardening, which is perfect for people living in apartments without much workable green space.The book contains 20 projects that rely on upcycled materials for growing herbs, vegetables, and flowers in compact spaces.In his book Gillman discusses fads like compost tea and how pesticides labeled as organic aren’t necessarily safer or less destructive to the environment

How To Build An Outdoor Patio With A Fire Pit

How To Build An Outdoor Patio With A Fire Pit

Imagine gathering with friends and family, sipping wine, roasting hot dogs, and making s'mores around your fire pit during cool nights.The secret to these low costs is the basic building materials used to form the fire pits, such as bricks, pavers, concrete, and retaining wall blocks

How To Paint Outdoor Patio Tiles

How To Paint Outdoor Patio Tiles

So I really wanted to give the area a bit of help to make it feel like a cozy space.The cleaner helps remove grease and makes the concrete more porous for paint adhesion.Since the “tiles” are supposed to be touching, I worked on painting every other row and every other square (with Sherwin-Williams Tricorn Black) until the whole area was filled in.Since the concrete is rougher and smoother in different parts, I had a few rough spots where the paint bled under the painter’s tape.The space is feeling SO much better with the faux tile, and I love how the pops of green plants stand out against the pattern.Projects like this can be a lot of work, but the saved money vs

How To Clean Outdoor Patio Slabs

How To Clean Outdoor Patio Slabs

Cleaning your outdoor tile patio might not sound like the most fun way to spend an afternoon, but it really only takes a few simple steps – and it’s a chore you can reap the benefits of all summer long.Here, we explain how to clean your patio tiles and talk you through each step of tackling algae and grime on everything from concrete paths to outdoor stone.If your patio is in need of a bit more attention, get in touch with our team to book an outdoor tile and grout cleaning service.Read on for expert tips and advice, so you can get to work and then kick back and relax in your sparkling clean retreat.The most important thing is to identify what kind of tile your outdoor patio is made of and adjust your process accordingly, to protect the quality and construction of the material.Use the garden hose to dampen and rinse the patio, or fill a bucket of water and carefully spread it evenly across the entire area.Harsh chemicals can damage your outdoor tile and poison the plants, animals, and bugs in your yard.Follow the manufacturer instructions and do a spot test to ensure there are no negative effects before you throw yourself into cleaning.While regular cleaning will keep your outdoor patio looking fresh, pro cleaners have specialized equipment and methods that will remove residue from deep in the tile, which improves the appearance and protects them from wear during the long term.We clean concrete, porcelain, flagstone, and natural stone tiles and will adapt our methods and equipment to suit the materials and condition of your outdoor patio.We’ll use a rotary scrub, hot water, and natural cleansers to comprehensively clean and rinse the tile.However, you should also sweep and rinse it regularly to prevent buildup of dirt and mildew – aim to give it a once-over every couple of weeks.Harsh chemicals can not only damage your tiles (especially if they’re made from natural stone), but bleach can leak into your yard and have negative effects for the plants and animals in your area.With a little effort, you can make sure your outdoor patio is a space that looks and feels fresh – ready for entertaining, family fun, or lazy afternoons

How To Build Outdoor Patio Sectional

How To Build Outdoor Patio Sectional

While this was definitely a labor-intensive, dusty project, it was well worth it and SO much cheaper than buying a brand new, solid wood outdoor sectional.Before I share all of the steps that went into making an outdoor sectional, I wanted to include our total cost breakdown.Still, I included the total costs for you in case you don’t happen to make the outdoor table to go along with it!In order to make the sectional feel like a custom sofa, you’ll want to design it with your cushions in mind.The cushions we ended up getting from World Market were several inches bigger than the original plans allowed for.I am a paper person, so I printed our table plans before measuring and making cuts.I labeled the tops of the boards with the coordinating letters from the cut list, which made it much easier when putting the table together.Unlike the outdoor table plans, this sectional didn’t call for any notching.We made a lot of alternations to the original plans to add depth and length to the sofa, but overall it still came together fairly quickly!We learned a lot with the DIY outdoor table, and since the sectional didn’t require any notching, it really wasn’t too time-consuming.I decided to use the same Varathane Flagstone stain we used on our outdoor patio table.I bought these replacement cushions from World Market and they turned out to be a perfect fit for our sectional!This DIY outdoor sectional certainly brought its share of trial and error/improvising, but I am really happy with the way it turned out!The sectional is extremely heaving—meaning it’s also durable and will stand the wear and tear of use for years to come.I like to hang out on Instagram and share more in-depth tutorials on everything I make, create, and organize

How To Build An Outdoor Patio Deck

How To Build An Outdoor Patio Deck

It can shield you from the neighbors, surround you with flowers and provide fresh herbs just steps away from your kitchen or grill

How Much Will It Cost To Patio My Garden

How Much Will It Cost To Patio My Garden

Options range from embarking on a DIY effort that costs a few thousand dollars to hiring professionals to create something with luxury-style glam on a much larger budget."You can spend $500 to $2,000 for simple DIY improvements like fixing the lawn, planting shrubs, or building a pea gravel or concrete paver patio.You could also place a premade metal firepit in this price range," says Andra DelMonico, lead interior designer for Trendey.Discover makes loans without regard to race, color, religion, national origin, sex, disability, or familial status.This type of outdoor improvement is not only fairly straightforward and budget-friendly, but firepits also provide a great place for social gatherings in the COVID-19 era.Firepits offer a safe way to still spend time with your loved ones while staying warm and cozy around a fire," says Thomas Jepsen, CEO of Passion Plans, a homebuilding platform that provides consumers with everything from blueprints to construction advice.In Jepsen's experience, the starting price is closer to about $1,000 for such projects, and that estimate doesn't include the cost of laying pavers around the firepit or the prep work that must be done to create an attractive outdoor space overall."In a lot of instances, the firepit itself can be constructed by someone wishing to do it themselves, although using a pro will ensure that it's done better and that there aren't any problematic materials being used that shouldn't come in close contact with a heat source as significant as a fire," says Jepsen.When you add in the cost of hiring a professional to do at least some of the work, you can expect to pay around $2,000 for your firepit project, Jepsen estimates.To construct an outdoor kitchen on a budget, consider connecting it to your home so that running electricity, gas, and water hookups will be less expensive, says Lee.Creating an inviting outdoor oasis should at a minimum involve making the landscaping visually appealing, says DelMonico.Although landscaping details and prices vary wildly depending on the scope of the project and size of your yard, DelMonico says that for between $1,000 to $5,000 you can buy plants, grass seed, and trim trees.In fact, according to Justin Goldman, CEO of RenoFi, a platform that connects homeowners with renovation loans for remodeling projects, it's often the most expensive item on outdoor to-do lists.There are numerous variables contributing to that price tag, including two expenses few people consider: topographic survey work and stormwater management.And if you have your heart set on a sleek, stylish infinity edge pool, plan to tack another $35,000 onto the price tag.Tessa Isett of Neil Kelly Company, one of the largest remodeling firms in the Pacific Northwest, suggests the best place to start is thinking about your pain points

How To Grow A Garden On The Patio

How To Grow A Garden On The Patio

If you’re looking for a way to grow food that doesn’t involve a half acre of land and a strong back, consider setting up a patio vegetable garden.All you need to start growing today is a sunny spot on a relatively level surface, some containers, potting soil, and the right veggies.In this article, I’ll walk you through the process of setting up and maintaining a patio vegetable garden of your own.As a horticulturist, I grow dozens of containers filled with veggies on my patio every season, but there’s no need to create something so extensive.Thankfully, patio vegetable gardening isn’t super expensive, nor does it require a ton of labor beyond the initial set up.Yes, you will have to care for your plants all season long (more on how to do this in a bit), but maintenance is minimal when compared to an in-ground garden.That means when seeking out the ideal site for a patio vegetable garden, choose a location that receives a minimum of 8 hours of full sun per day.Feel free to set up the garden on a porch, deck, driveway, parking pad, or patio.Leafy green vegetables, like lettuce, kale, and chard, and some root crops, like carrots and radish, grow fine with as little as 4 to 6 hours of sun.However, if you’d like to grow heat-loving vegetables like tomatoes, peppers, beans, and squash, you’ll want to choose the sunniest spot possible.Use wheeled planters and pot dollies to move the containers from one side of the patio to the other each day to increase their light exposure.Another feature to be on the lookout for when choosing where to put your patio vegetable garden is a water source.10-15 gallons minimum for each extra-large vegetable, such as full-sized indeterminate tomatoes, winter squash, pumpkins, melons, and artichokes.This includes peppers, eggplants, tomatillos, dwarf blueberry bushes, cucumbers, summer squash/zucchini, and bush-type winter squash varieties.This includes kohlrabi, lettuce, kale, chard, collards, spinach, true micro tomatoes, and other greens.Making my own potting soil for my patio vegetable garden saves me a lot of money every year.Patio vegetable gardens can be really beautiful when planted in gorgeous colorful pots.Fill the pots and then stack them on top of each other to create a tiered food fountain for a corner of the patio or deck.Fill the pots with a mixture of edible greens, herbs, and compact tomato and pepper varieties.If you’re on a budget, consider growing your patio vegetable garden in repurposed milk crates.To grow multiple layers and maximize space, stack the crates checkerboard-style to create a “wall” of vegetable plants.They come in a range of sizes and have a removable drain plug so you don’t have to drill holes in the bottom for drainage.Each stock tank can house multiple plants and become a patio vegetable garden in just an hour or two.Once your patio containers have been planted, it doesn’t mean it’s time to sit back and relax.Watering is always the biggest maintenance task when growing a patio vegetable garden.Many vegetables produce better when regularly harvested, including beans, cucumbers, tomatoes, peppers, and zucchini

Best Plants For Deck Containers

Best Plants For Deck Containers

The hanging flowers are indeed trumpet-shape and can reach more than 1 foot long, depending on variety

What Is The Best Material For Vegetable Garden Paths

What Is The Best Material For Vegetable Garden Paths

While I don’t want to put a lot of time and effort into maintaining meticulous pathways, I do want them to serve me by providing firm footing in all types of weather.The amount of mulch created by one pass with the mower was quite small, too, but the worst part came in the second and third years, when the perennial weeds I dislike the most – bindweed, ground ivy and quackgrass - managed to find safe havens in the green paths.Unfortunately, many of the first combinations that come to mind – leaves over newspapers, or grass clippings over biodegradable plastic film – begin admitting weeds after only a month or so of trampling, and meanwhile they can become dangerously slippery in wet weather.The best mulch materials for vegetable garden pathways I have found (so far), are a double layer of commercial grade, woven landscaping fabric covered with wood chips or sawdust.In addition to providing safe footing and keeping out most weeds, the landscape fabric is easy to lift and flip over in winter, when it’s time to redo the garden paths.These days I think of my vegetable garden pathways as a little system of trails that need and deserve regular upkeep, and I’ve given up on the dream of leaving clovers in charge

Best Patio Garden Containers

Best Patio Garden Containers

If you are buying tomato seedlings, look for short, stocky plants that do not have blossoms yet.Keep in mind the larger the tomato variety the bigger the pot it will require

What Is The Best Material To Line A Raised Garden Bed

What Is The Best Material To Line A Raised Garden Bed

Raised beds can provide superior protection from pests and weeds, offer comfortable ergonomics, and can be filled with ideal soil to grow food, flowers, herbs and more.This article will go over the most common (and not-so-common) materials used to make raised garden beds – including wood, metal, concrete, and more.We’ll discuss things to consider when choosing materials such as durability or safety, as well as the differences between various types of lumber.Finally, don’t miss the list of potential raised bed materials that we suggest to avoid for organic gardening.In addition to the list above, you could create a raised garden bed out of just about anything capable of holding soil and plants!After all, garden beds are subject to near-constant moisture, outdoor elements, and potentially insects or pests such as termites.Edit: Check out this newer article with 7 ways to make wood raised garden beds last as long as possible, with information on sealing, silicone and more!If you opt to save money upfront and choose more affordable materials, you might be sacrificing the lifespan of your raised bed.For example, a planter box constructed of reclaimed pallets or soft pine wood likely won’t hold up half as long as one made with premium lumber.Likewise, large stones or concrete blocks will cost more than straw bales, but last a literal lifetime in comparison!Depending on your situation, you may be more than willing to give up a little lifespan to keep upfront costs down – especially if you’re renting your current home, or only setting up a temporary garden space.Heck, if you have easy access to large felled logs, it’s possible to create an incredibly durable AND affordable bed.For example, we are able to find great deals (and a larger variety of materials) for stones, blocks, gravel, bulk soil and mulch at our locally-owned landscape supply companies.For instance, I would think twice before using painted or treated salvaged wood to create a garden bed for edible crops.The wood may be contaminated with toxic chemicals like lead, arsenic, or other heavy metals that can migrate (leach) into your soil and food.I’ve seen people use all kinds of up-cycled materials to make garden beds: like styrofoam coolers (made of polystyrene, a suspected carcinogen) or old car ties (contain benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and a host of other substances that are toxic to human health).We’ve found that redwood is more affordable on the west coast, while cedar is more readily available and thus less expensive in the eastern US.Examples of long-lasting hardwood lumber include teak, maple, beech, hemlock, walnut, black locust, and oak.We built redwood raised beds around our patio, and attached trellises to the back to also double as chicken-proof fencing.Redwood and cedar definitely don’t require a protective sealer, but may benefit from it in climates with high humidity or precipitation.Cedar also gracefully ages with time, changing from reddish tan to silver grey (unless a sealer is routinely applied).That said, galvanized steel raised garden beds are a great choice for super wet climates!Even if the metal feels warm to the touch, damp soil does a great job of buffering temperature swings.Or, turn a prefabricated metal container into a raised garden bed – such as adding drainage holes to the bottom of a galvanized steel animal feed or water trough.My friend Kevin just started selling some super durable and stylish Birdies garden bed kits, shown below.Gardener’s Supply Company also offers a stellar selection of well-rated galvanized steel options like this modular bed kit.Through the galvanization process, steel is coated with a layer of zinc that effectively seals it and prevents corrosion and rust.Plants rely on zinc for healthy root development, for added resilience to cold temperatures, and to support other phytochemical processes such as the formation of chlorophyll.However, if your galvanized steel beds start to visibly corrode on the interior, it is best to play it safe and replace them.Like those made from metal, raised garden beds constructed from concrete pavers, cinderblocks, or brick have the potential to be supremely durable and sturdy.The installation of concrete block garden beds require a decent level of commitment, especially if you secure them in place with mortar or adhesive.A freshly terraced slope in our front yard garden, made with concrete blocks and adhesive.Fly ash is a common concern when using pavers, bricks, or cinder block materials to create raised garden beds.Fly ash is a masonry additive that contains heavy metals such as radium and arsenic, and is often used in concrete products for added durability.If you’re concerned about this risk, buy your materials from a reputable source where you can ask questions and check specifications to see if fly ash is present or not.A raised concrete block planting area in our back yard, used primarily for perennial ornamentals.Going beyond concrete blocks, you can make long-lasting raised planting areas using natural stone too – such as cobblestones, flagstone, small boulders, or other foraged rock material.Because the shapes and sizes of natural rocks aren’t as cookie-cutter as concrete blocks, the construction will require more imagination and finagling to puzzle-piece them together.Historically, pressure treated lumber was cured with an arsenic-based compound called chromated copper arsenate (CCA).Arsenic is very bad news, and studies show that it readily leach from the treated lumber into the surrounding soil.Historically, pressure treated lumber was cured with an arsenic-based compound called chromated copper arsenate (CCA).Arsenic is very bad news, and studies show that it readily leach from the treated lumber into the surrounding soil.Other risky materials such as styrofoam, used car tires, or miscellaneous plastic products (as discussed in the safety section above)

How To Clean Exterior Granite

How To Clean Exterior Granite

Archaeological evidence indicates that the Great Pyramid of Khafre, the one believed to have been adorned with gold plating at the top, was once covered with delicately finished granite and limestone slabs, which likely attracted a lot of dirt and grime just a few years after installation.Cleaning exterior surfaces made of raw fieldstone or engineered paving bricks is something that can be accomplished with power washers, rugged brooms, and even wire brushes, but this isn’t recommended for finer natural stone such as travertine, marble, granite, flagstone, and bluestone.Since outdoor stone surfaces are bound to get dirtier and require scrubbing, you may want to use a half-and-half mixture of cleaner and water.When highly porous stone such as marble is used in exterior spaces, maintaining a fresh surface seal becomes crucial, and this is the case even if it’s covered by a roof and doesn’t feature a polished finish.Make sure to thoroughly clean the surface before applying granite sealer , which should be reapplied as soon as you notice water drops or puddles leaving dark spots or, preferably, before these issues occur.Just like on the tiles and countertops in your kitchen and bathrooms, mold colonies can form on your exterior stone, which is why you need to keep it clean and free of dirt, debris, and water

What Is The Best Outdoor Electric Heater

What Is The Best Outdoor Electric Heater

Popular throughout the American Sun Belt and other regions with relatively mild temperatures, outdoor heaters can take the edge off cold weather and keep the party going past the point when you would otherwise head indoors.So, while propane is considered a “cleaner” fuel than gas or coal, it’s often sourced through destructive environmental practices like fracking and underwater oil drilling.Propane heaters tend to produce more heat than electric ones because they aren’t limited to your home’s circuit system.But on the flip side, this means they have fewer safety features because they won’t shut off if the circuit becomes overloaded.The amount of fuel you will go through depends on the heat setting and surrounding air temperature, but plan to burn more the colder it gets.According to Amerigas, you can estimate that you’ll generate 22,000 Btu (British thermal units) of heat per hour per pound of propane burned.Not only does that leave you without the task of refilling empty propane tanks, but it offers the opportunity to tap into renewable energy if that’s what powers your home.When used for outdoor heaters, propane gets much hotter than electric heat, meaning you need to use less energy to achieve desired temperatures.On the flip side, it’s possible to power electric heaters off renewable energy sources like wind or solar.Like an indoor furnace, it warms the air immediately around it, meaning the heat can be easily lost with any amount of wind.A small porch won’t need a powerful heater, but a larger patio may be better served with a bigger unit or even two or three spaced throughout.Seek out models that have automatic shutoff valves, cool touch glass, and protection against tipping over.Small but mighty, this telescoping outdoor heater puts out impressive warmth, considering its operational capacity of 5,500 Btus.Operating at an impressive 90 percent heating efficiency, you’ll waste little energy using this heater outdoors—guaranteeing guilt-free outdoor gatherings.With this Briza infrared heater, you can switch between the convenience of portability with a tripod stand or mount the model on your wall or ceiling for hassle-free heating that’s entirely out of the way.And with an IP 55 rating, the Briza can operate smoothly in all elements, making it a viable heating strategy even in the midst of snowfall.It’s meant to be mounted permanently to an outdoor wall or ceiling to serve as a discrete heating source that doesn’t take up valuable square footage in your entertaining space.It boasts an impressive 38,500 Btus at maximum capacity and can heat 180 square feet of outdoor space.This modern heater won’t look out of place with the chicest patio furniture, ensuring that it brings the aesthetics of your entertainment space up a notch.This premium heater runs on a 20 or 30-lb propane tank (not included) and can operate in winds up to 7.5 miles an hour, which the company claims is more than twice its competitors.Standard safety features like a gas flow shutoff if the flame goes out or the heater tips ensure you can use it stress-free.Considered one of the best brands for off-grid outdoor heat, it’s the perfect size to warm four to five people sitting close.As with most outdoor heaters, it comes with an automatic safety shutoff function in case it tips over, as well as an oxygen depletion sensor.Forced air heaters tend to be a poor choice outdoors if you’re concerned about conservation, but this model from Hampton Bay still makes our list thanks to its heat-focusing reflectors.It’s powerful enough to heat 120 square feet of patio space and comes with a high-quality powder coating for durability despite the elements.Let’s not pretend otherwise—it’s a strange proposition to heat outdoor air using fossil fuels that are responsible for accelerating global warming in the first place.Choosing the smallest size that will work for your space, refraining from using it when you’re not right near it, and bundling up with extra clothing and blankets will all help you to stay warm without burning fossil fuels

What Is The Best Material For A Patio Table

What Is The Best Material For A Patio Table

One important consideration, no matter your style, is how well your furniture will hold up to your weather conditions, including moisture, hot sun and strong winds

How To Plant A Garden On A Deck

How To Plant A Garden On A Deck

These skinny deck gardening beds here can be used to grow tomatoes, lettuces, basil, oregano, dill, chives, and flowers like zinnia, daisy, and marigold.Carol from GardeningCook.com shares her valuable tips and knowledge for creating a deck vegetable garden in her article here.You can use it to grow your favorite aromatic herbs, dwarf vegetables, greens, or flowers.Check out the step-by-step process tutorial on making a deck vegetable garden.This quick project at Craftivity Designs shows how to create a small deck rail herb garden.Recycled Shutter Mason Jar Herb Garden.For this project, you’ll need an old shutter or reclaimed pallet or plyboard, a few large mason jars, herbs, and hose clamps.To grow more plants in a compact area like a balcony, patio, or deck garden, a ladder planter is the greatest solution.A tiered vegetable or herb garden is the best way to squeeze more space onto your deck or patio

Best Outdoor Patio Sets 2021

Best Outdoor Patio Sets 2021

Whether you plan to bring your workstation outside or gather with family members for an impromptu BBQ, you'll need to make smart design choices

What Is The Best Material To Use For Raised Garden Beds

What Is The Best Material To Use For Raised Garden Beds

Raised beds can provide superior protection from pests and weeds, offer comfortable ergonomics, and can be filled with ideal soil to grow food, flowers, herbs and more.This article will go over the most common (and not-so-common) materials used to make raised garden beds – including wood, metal, concrete, and more.We’ll discuss things to consider when choosing materials such as durability or safety, as well as the differences between various types of lumber.Finally, don’t miss the list of potential raised bed materials that we suggest to avoid for organic gardening.In addition to the list above, you could create a raised garden bed out of just about anything capable of holding soil and plants!After all, garden beds are subject to near-constant moisture, outdoor elements, and potentially insects or pests such as termites.Edit: Check out this newer article with 7 ways to make wood raised garden beds last as long as possible, with information on sealing, silicone and more!If you opt to save money upfront and choose more affordable materials, you might be sacrificing the lifespan of your raised bed.For example, a planter box constructed of reclaimed pallets or soft pine wood likely won’t hold up half as long as one made with premium lumber.Likewise, large stones or concrete blocks will cost more than straw bales, but last a literal lifetime in comparison!Depending on your situation, you may be more than willing to give up a little lifespan to keep upfront costs down – especially if you’re renting your current home, or only setting up a temporary garden space.Heck, if you have easy access to large felled logs, it’s possible to create an incredibly durable AND affordable bed.For example, we are able to find great deals (and a larger variety of materials) for stones, blocks, gravel, bulk soil and mulch at our locally-owned landscape supply companies.For instance, I would think twice before using painted or treated salvaged wood to create a garden bed for edible crops.The wood may be contaminated with toxic chemicals like lead, arsenic, or other heavy metals that can migrate (leach) into your soil and food.I’ve seen people use all kinds of up-cycled materials to make garden beds: like styrofoam coolers (made of polystyrene, a suspected carcinogen) or old car ties (contain benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, heavy metals, and a host of other substances that are toxic to human health).We’ve found that redwood is more affordable on the west coast, while cedar is more readily available and thus less expensive in the eastern US.Examples of long-lasting hardwood lumber include teak, maple, beech, hemlock, walnut, black locust, and oak.We built redwood raised beds around our patio, and attached trellises to the back to also double as chicken-proof fencing.Redwood and cedar definitely don’t require a protective sealer, but may benefit from it in climates with high humidity or precipitation.Cedar also gracefully ages with time, changing from reddish tan to silver grey (unless a sealer is routinely applied).That said, galvanized steel raised garden beds are a great choice for super wet climates!Even if the metal feels warm to the touch, damp soil does a great job of buffering temperature swings.Or, turn a prefabricated metal container into a raised garden bed – such as adding drainage holes to the bottom of a galvanized steel animal feed or water trough.My friend Kevin just started selling some super durable and stylish Birdies garden bed kits, shown below.Gardener’s Supply Company also offers a stellar selection of well-rated galvanized steel options like this modular bed kit.Through the galvanization process, steel is coated with a layer of zinc that effectively seals it and prevents corrosion and rust.Plants rely on zinc for healthy root development, for added resilience to cold temperatures, and to support other phytochemical processes such as the formation of chlorophyll.However, if your galvanized steel beds start to visibly corrode on the interior, it is best to play it safe and replace them.Like those made from metal, raised garden beds constructed from concrete pavers, cinderblocks, or brick have the potential to be supremely durable and sturdy.The installation of concrete block garden beds require a decent level of commitment, especially if you secure them in place with mortar or adhesive.A freshly terraced slope in our front yard garden, made with concrete blocks and adhesive.Fly ash is a common concern when using pavers, bricks, or cinder block materials to create raised garden beds.Fly ash is a masonry additive that contains heavy metals such as radium and arsenic, and is often used in concrete products for added durability.If you’re concerned about this risk, buy your materials from a reputable source where you can ask questions and check specifications to see if fly ash is present or not.A raised concrete block planting area in our back yard, used primarily for perennial ornamentals.Going beyond concrete blocks, you can make long-lasting raised planting areas using natural stone too – such as cobblestones, flagstone, small boulders, or other foraged rock material.Because the shapes and sizes of natural rocks aren’t as cookie-cutter as concrete blocks, the construction will require more imagination and finagling to puzzle-piece them together.Historically, pressure treated lumber was cured with an arsenic-based compound called chromated copper arsenate (CCA).Arsenic is very bad news, and studies show that it readily leach from the treated lumber into the surrounding soil.Historically, pressure treated lumber was cured with an arsenic-based compound called chromated copper arsenate (CCA).Arsenic is very bad news, and studies show that it readily leach from the treated lumber into the surrounding soil.Other risky materials such as styrofoam, used car tires, or miscellaneous plastic products (as discussed in the safety section above)

What Is The Best Coil Garden Hose

What Is The Best Coil Garden Hose

But small differences can have a big impact on how long the hose lasts and how easy it is to use.But many homeowners who buy lower quality hoses end up replacing theirs each year due to leaks, cracks or rot.Although some problems can be repaired, it’s generally more cost-effective to buy a good quality hose to begin with.In this article, we review the features to consider when buying a new garden hose so that you’ll know what to look for in choosing a quality product.Not only do longer hoses cost more, but they’re heavier to move around, need more storage space, can be difficult to drain before putting them away for the winter, and can result in lower water pressure coming out the end.They tend to be lighter weight but because of the smaller diameter they don’t carry as much water.These hoses are not appropriate for use with sprinklers or anything that requires higher water pressure (like washing your car).You’ll commonly find garden hoses made of rubber, vinyl, or a combination of the two.A basic vinyl hose (usually reinforced with a radial cord) is the least expensive and most lightweight option but also the least sturdy.It’s more prone to kinking, splitting and cracking than other materials and can degrade quickly if left in the sun or exposed to harsh weather.Rubber hoses are generally the strongest and most long-lasting, but also carry the highest price tag and can be heavy to haul around the garden.Rubber has the added benefits of being able to carry hot water, being less likely to kink, and resisting cracking and ozone deterioration (so they don’t fall apart if left in the sun).Be careful with both rubber and vinyl garden hoses as they leach chemicals into the water than make it unsafe to drink.These are generally made from polyurethane and have been specially built so as not to leach harmful chemicals.For pressure washer use, check your manual before buying a hose – you may need an even higher psi.Garden hose couplings are the end pieces that attach to spigots, sprinklers and nozzles.You can identify cast brass because it’s thicker than sheet metal and usually has an octagonal shape so that the coupling can be turned with a wrench.Thin stamped-metal fittings can be difficult to tighten at the spigot, bend easily (so don’t step on it or run over it with the lawnmower or car), and break down over time.All else being equal, a large octagon-shaped coupling is easiest to tighten, particularly for those of us with stiff fingers or lower grip strength.We always recommend that you use a high quality rubber washer (such as this one from Gilmour) at the connection point between the hose fitting and the spigot or nozzle.These hoses are generally made from vinyl (sometimes with a reinforcing mesh or multiple plies (layers)) so can kink more easily, often have plastic fittings, and tend to come in thinner diameters but prices are in the lower range.While you can find light duty hoses online, your best bet is to visit your local home improvement store or garden center.Price Reduction Flexon PH5850 50FT Commercial Black Premium Rubber Hose, Multi With crush-proof solid brass couplings, high burst strength, and a 10-year warranty, this heavy-duty rubber garden hose is built to last.Scotts SMF58050CC MaxFlex Premium Heavy Duty Garden Hose, 5/8-Inch by 50-Feet, Green.>> Lead-free for safe drinking, with heavy-duty aluminum couplings, reinforcement at the spigot end, and a 500psi burst strength.Has a coiled collar at the spigot end, lead-free aluminum couplings, and an anti-microbial to prevent build-up of mold and mildew.>> With a lifetime replacement guarantee, this hose stays flexible at temperatures below freezing, has brass couplings and a collar, and a 500 psi burst strength rating.You’ve probably seen ads on TV for these scrunchie-like hoses that expand up to three times their length when filled with water.Plus, unlike other expandable hoses, it stretches to a full-size 5/8 inch diameter and 50 feet in length.With a 5-year warranty and no signs of wear after almost a year of extensive use in the garden, it is clearly built to last.Look for hoses labeled “drinking water safe” or at least “lead-free” – you’ll often find them sold for recreational use, such as for use in boats and RVs.Water Right PSH-050-MG-4PKRS Polyurethane Lead Safe Ultra-Light Slim Garden Hose, 50-Foot x 7/16-Inch, Olive Green.7/16-inch inside diameter handles 4-5 gallons per minute flow rate, although this is less than the typical 5/8″ hose.>> Made from recycled material with nickel-plated brass fittings and extra thick walls to minimize spurting.Instead, you cut it to the desired length and insert the provided friction-fit, plastic male and female fittings.It’s not a hose that you’d bury but it’s more flexible than a rubber soaker and works well with low water pressure.>> These 1/2-inch hoses are easily customizable to meet your irrigation needs – just cut pieces to length and connect.They generally come in shorter lengths (15-foot and 25-foot lengths are most common, although some companies make longer ones) and a ½-inch or smaller diameter (resulting in lower water flow and pressure compared to a typical garden hose).Water Right PCH-050-MG-6PKRS Polyurethane Lead Safe Coil Garden Hose, 50-Foot x 3/8-Inch (Olive Green).>> Chrome-plated machined brass fittings with a collar and a 12-inch section of straight hose at both ends to make it easier to attach and use.>> Features a coil spring hose protector and solid brass compression couplings, plus a faucet adapter.Because they’re very flexible (so that they can flatten out), flat garden hoses are generally made of vinyl, puncture and kink more easily and have a lower burst pressure rating.Last update on 2021-12-04 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API