Can You Put A Storage Container In Your Garden

Can You Put A Storage Container In Your Garden

Of course, if you are fortunate enough to have a large garden, you can opt for these larger sizes, which represent the best value for money.Again you can opt for wood cladding , but if you are on a smaller budget then opt for a repaint which can give a much improved aesthetic to a second hand shipping container – a dark green shade is a popular colour for garden containers as again, it helps the container blend in with the surroundings

How To Make Self Watering Container Garden

How To Make Self Watering Container Garden

This attractive cedar design uses perforated drain pipe to store and distribute the water.Unfortunately, growing veggies during the height of summer requires daily watering, which can quickly become a problem when you go away for vacation.The total cost of this 3 x 6-ft

Can You Plant Watermelon In A Container

Can You Plant Watermelon In A Container

Unless you have a large vegetable garden, it’s tough to find room to grow everything you’d like to, especially when it comes to vine crops that take up a lot of room.Yes, you can grow watermelon in pots.The benefits of growing watermelon in containers.This means you can plant your watermelon seeds or transplants a few weeks in advance of planting in the ground.Later in this article, I’ll share some very useful tips for making sure your container watermelons get enough water.The best watermelon varieties for growing in containers.The vines of standard watermelon varieties can grow up to 10 feet in length, making them difficult to manage in containers.What size pot is best for growing watermelon in containers.If you choose a container that’s too small, the roots won’t have enough room to spread.Choose a pot that holds at least 7 to 10 gallons of soil per plant if you’re growing ‘Bush Sugar Baby’ or ‘Sugar Pot’.The best soil for growing watermelon in containers.Aside from the size of the container and choosing the right variety, the next important factor in growing watermelons in containers is the soil.Should you grow from seed or transplants?Planting from seed is inexpensive, and it’s easier to make sure you’re growing the specific variety you want (‘Bush Sugar Baby’ in this instance – seeds are available here).The main downside when growing watermelon in containers from seed is the length of the growing season.If that’s the case, you should opt for planting transplants instead of seeds because it gives you a few weeks’ worth of a head start.How to plant watermelons in containers from seed.Do not over plant.Growing watermelon in containers from transplants.If the transplants were grown in nursery packs or pots, try not to disturb the roots when planting them.Watering container watermelon plants.Immediately after planting your watermelon seeds or transplants, water them in thoroughly.For my 13-gallon pot, I add about 3 to 5 gallons of water each time I water.Do not subject the vines to extended dry periods followed by lots of irrigation, especially when the fruits are close to being ripe.The best fertilizer for container watermelons.While you can purchase a brix meter if you’d like, most home gardeners look for other ways to tell when their melons are ripe for the picking.Since you know that ‘Bush Sugar Baby’ requires about 80 to 85 days to mature, mark your calendar to check for melon ripeness around that time.Do not harvest too early because watermelons picked before they are ripe will not ripen after they’ve been severed from the vine.• For the sweetest flavor, stop watering your watermelons two weeks before harvest

How Deep Should A Planter Box Be For Carrots

How Deep Should A Planter Box Be For Carrots

One large round planter can yield up to 30-40 carrots per harvest, depending on the weather, variety, and how many you’ve planted.My favorite thing about growing them in containers is that there are no wild critter issues, since my planter is close to the house where I can keep an eye on it.Any container shape will work; the main concern is making sure it is deep enough to accommodate your chosen cultivar.Ideally, you’ll choose a variety that develops a short, more rounded root rather than a long thin one.This year I am growing some carrots in a styrofoam cooler that I am dedicating to root crops, because not every pot has to look beautiful.Place the vessel in a location that receives the amount of sunlight that’s best for the specific variety you are growing.Most carrots do best in full sun, but double check the seed packet for yours before deciding on the perfect spot.It is best to place the pot in your selected location before filling it, because a large planter becomes heavy once it’s full of soil and water and difficult to move around.A purchased product specifically for vegetables will have a good combination of ingredients such as peat moss, sand, and vermiculite.You want to be sure that the potting medium is smooth, light, and airy, for adequate drainage and optimal root growth.You can sow seeds in your containers outdoors as early as 2 to 3 weeks before the last expected frost date for your area.To jump-start the process, you can start seeds indoors in biodegradable pots a few weeks ahead of time.When they have their first set of true leaves, trim away the weaker ones with a pair of scissors or pull them gently up by their roots.If the tops of the carrots start to grow above the soil line and are exposed to sunlight for extended periods, they will turn green and become bitter.Cultivars to Select Many types of carrot will grow well in containers, and nurseries and seed companies will often note which varieties are best for planting in small spaces.As a general rule of thumb, 8-inch carrots will fit just fine in a pot that is 12 inches deep.Provided you have used fresh soil and thinned your plants adequately, you shouldn’t have any major problems with pests or disease.You’ll know your carrots are ready for harvest when the tops of the root are just visible above the soil line.If you are growing a spring crop for a summer harvest, keep an eye on your plants as the high temperatures can cause them to bolt.If you have a garden, you could mix the spent potting medium into the ground in one of your plots or beds and let the soil’s beneficial microbes refresh it

Best Containers For Outdoor Plants

Best Containers For Outdoor Plants

Container gardening is ideal for those with little or no garden space.Container gardening also adds versatility to gardens large and small.Houseplants summering outdoors in the shade also make a handsome addition to container gardening.The best combinations depend on plants that feature handsome foliage and flowers produced over a long bloom season.Finally, add the fillers, which are plants with smaller leaves and flowers that add color and fill in the arrangement all season long.Small hanging baskets are especially prone to drying out, and during hot summer weather, you may have to water them twice a day to keep plants alive.Consider the size and shape of a plant's root system; whether it is a perennial, annual, or shrub; and how rapidly it grows.Rootbound plants, which have filled up every square inch of the soil available, dry out rapidly and won't grow well.Choose a large pot or tub for a mixed planting, one that will offer enough root space for all the plants you want to grow.Whatever container you choose, drainage holes are essential.The holes need not be large, but there must be enough that excess water can drain out.Plain concrete containers are very heavy, so they are difficult to move and not suitable for using on decks or balconies.Plastic and fiberglass pots and planters are lightweight, relatively inexpensive, and available in many sizes and shapes.Wood is natural-looking and protects roots from rapid temperature swings.Since containers are heavy once they're filled with soil, decide where they will be located and move them into position before filling and planting.While your containers must have drainage holes, it's not necessary to cover the holes with pot shards or gravel before you add potting mix.Plain garden soil is too dense for container gardening.For containers up to 1 gallon in size, use a houseplant soil mixture.Pre-moisten soil either by watering it before you fill containers or by flooding the containers with water several times and stirring.Don't fill pots level to the top with soil mixture — leave space for watering.So consider how heavy the container will be and decide how you will move it before choosing a nonhardy plant.Or perhaps try a pizza garden, with different types of basil, plus tomatoes and peppers.Ornamental grasses are great in container gardening, too, as are dwarf conifers and small shrubs.Water container plants thoroughly.How often depends on many factors such as weather, plant size, and pot size.To keep large containers attractive, spread a layer of mulch as you would in the garden.Or foliar feed by spraying the leaves with doubly diluted preparations of these solutions.To keep mixed pots attractive, dig out or cut back any plants that don't grow well or that clash

How To Container Plant Lettuce

How To Container Plant Lettuce

Growing Lettuce in Containers is a fun and easy process for having this fresh leafy green year-round!For continuous harvest do successive planting, sow seeds every two weeks throughout the growing season.Crisphead – This kind forms crisp, just like its name suggests, firm, large heads with paler leaves and less flavor to offer as compared to others.– This kind forms crisp, just like its name suggests, firm, large heads with paler leaves and less flavor to offer as compared to others.Loose Leaf – It is one of the easiest kinds to grow and care for and an ideal choice if you are a first-time lettuce grower.– It is one of the easiest kinds to grow and care for and an ideal choice if you are a first-time lettuce grower.Butterhead– This one is a favorite among many gardeners for their soft leaves taste mild and sweet and carries a very delicate flavor and a loosehead.The lettuce loves the sunlight, though it can be grown easily in a partially shaded area if you’re growing lettuce in a warm climate where the sun is intense, try to place the pot in a spot that receives only a few hours of the morning sun.Also, move the container to a cool spot when the temperature rises as this favorite green are heat sensitive.For growing healthy lettuce, use a good quality soil mix that has plenty of organic matter, such as compost and peat.Amending the soil with vegetable or fruit scraps is also a great idea to keep the plants healthy.Mildew, leaf spot, rot, and a variety of bacterial infections are common diseases that can attack lettuce.As the plant does not take a lot of space, growing it in balconies on railings, or in pots on a patio will be a great idea

How To Water Plants While Away On Holiday

How To Water Plants While Away On Holiday

But before you go, make sure that your plant babies are accounted for — you’ve taken such good care of them and would hate to see them withering away when you return.Each vacation plant watering system will put you at ease while hitting the beach.The flowers on this plant may arrive in buds, only to beautifully bloom after short time.Shop Now Sun Burst Yellow Rose Plant $40 Shipped in a Gift Box Our rose plant shares sunshine with an uplifting abundance of vibrant florals and lush foliage.While it may arrive in its bud-stage, the roses on this plant will beautifully bloom in a short time.Or use this method on a daily basis to create less watering work for you.If the bottle has an interesting design, it can also be a creative and fun decoration to add to your planter or pot.This solution may be reused as well by simply refilling the bottle after your plant drinks all the water.Then, take a nail and hammer it through the aluminum cap, creating five mini holes.Take the bottle off the cap and fill to the brim with water.Put the bottle (cap side first) into the hole you dug.Fill up your bathtub or sink (depending on how many plants you need to take care of while gone) with a couple inches of water.Lay a towel out over the water so the pots of the plants do not scrape up the tub or sink.In this method, you are linking up your plant to a water system using a simple cotton string.Wick watering works great for longer lengths of time — the more water you supply in the external bucket or vase, the longer your plants will be taken care of.Make sure to get cotton rope because this is the most absorbent material that will easily transfer into the soil of the plants.You want the rope to have slack on the end inside the vase of water and also be able to reach several inches under the soil.This method is one of the simplest, but you probably shouldn’t use this solution for plants that need special attention.Saucers not only help retain water for your plants but also make it so the soil does not leak out from the bottom of your pot, keeping everything nice and tidy while you’re away.Using a drainage pot is important so that the plant can reach the water that is going to be in the saucer.You don’t by any means need to construct walls or a roof for this method, it’s quite simple and a great long-lasting solution while you’re away from your plants.Be careful to follow the instructions on this strategy to avoid ruining your plants’ foliage.Don’t use this method in direct sunlight or with succulents as they might overheat or shrivel.If creating an automatic watering system is not your cup of tea, here is a list of plants that will stay bright and cheery when left for a few weeks.Even though these plants do not need to be watered for periods at a time, it’s safer to put them out of direct light to make them last longer.After deciding which DIY self-watering planter fits best, you can finally relax and not worry about how to water your plants while on vacation.The methods above are tested and proven to work, but if all else fails and you don’t think a self-watering system is the best choice for you, hire a plant sitter!

How To Make A Beautiful Container Garden

How To Make A Beautiful Container Garden

Get ready for some botanical Latin and let’s decode these magical container garden recipes!There is a magic formula in almost all these beautiful container gardens and flower pot designs: Thriller + Filler + Spiller.Plant list 2: Dracaena or African Iris (center spike), Pink Geranium, Mixed color Trailing Petunias, green Sweet Potato Vine.Plant list 3: Red Swiss Chard, Helleborus ‘Sunmarble’, Heuchera, Fern (Source: Le Jardinet ).Here are some great examples of how edibles can be mixed with ornamental plants in garden pots.Plant list 4: Artichoke, Kale, Light pink Verbena, Dichondra ‘Silver Falls’, White Petunia.Plant list 6: Succulents- Kalanchoe ‘Fantastic’, Sedum ‘Little Missy’, Echeveria, Dichondra ‘Silver Falls’.Plant list 7: Durango Dahlia, Great Balls of Fire White Ivy Leaf Geranium, Yellow Petunia, Bidens ferulifolia ‘Bidy Gonzales’ ( Source: HGTV ).Mixed flower pot plants ideas in showy burgundy colors.Plant list 9: Banana, Colues, Hibiscus, Asparagus Fern, Dichondra ‘Silver Falls’, White Verbena, Purple Petunia ( Source: UBD Landscape ).Some tropical plants grow well in water filled containers, which look great on a patio.You may also love: Easy DIY solar fountain with pond water plants!A white Hydrangea bush in a pale blue pot is so simple and elegant.Plant list 12: Rosemary, Garlic Chives, Helichrysum petiolare ( Source: Decorah Silver ).Plant list 13: Colocasia, Croton, Coleus “Strawberry Drop”, Sweet Potato Vine ( Source: BHG ).Plant list 14: Canna, Dahlia, Salvia, Ipomoea, Zinnia, Osteospermum, Verbena, Petunia, Calibrachoa.Rosemary makes a great evergreen plant just like classic boxwood in a garden design.This easy DIY solar fountain or patio pond with water garden plants is such a delight!Plant list 18: Mixed color Snapdragon, Salvia argentea, pink Petunia, Sedum ( Source: DecoFeelings ).Plant list 19: Hydrangea, Rose, Boxwood ( Original image source lost.Use a bowl shaped planter on top of a garden wall or column as a design focal point.Plant list 21: Red Mandevilla, Pink Calibrachoa, Sweet Potato Vine ( Source: Charlottesville Home ).Plant list 22: Red Mandevilla, Orange Calibrachoa, Variegated Pelargonium ( Geraniums) , Pink Petunia.Use shades of lavender, chartreuse and yellow to create a soft and dreamy garden flower pot.Plant list 23: Fountain Grass, ‘Phloxy Lady Purple Sky’ Phlox, ‘Electric Lime’ Coleus, Petunia, Lysimachia ‘Goldilocks’ ( Source: Fine Gardening ).Succulents often have interesting colors and textures, which look beautiful mixed with flower plantings

Is It Ok To Put Mulch In A Vegetable Garden

Is It Ok To Put Mulch In A Vegetable Garden

Over the years, I've mulched my vegetable garden with oat straw, newspaper, grass clippings, burlap coffee bags, leaves and black plastic.The straw looked great, but was expensive, and also contained so many seeds that I had to weed out foot-high oat plants for most of the summer.But it's a bear to put down (and keep down) when the wind is blowing; it doesn't let rainwater into the soil; and at the end of the season there's a lot of plastic for the landfill.With all this experience to draw from, I now try to match the mulch to the crop, weather conditions and soil.University field tests have shown that mulch can increase (or decrease) yields by as much as 30 percent, so it's worth thinking through the options.Heat-loving peppers, tomatoes, eggplant and melons are great candidates for black plastic mulch.Applied in early spring, the plastic will raise soil temperatures and help warm the air around the plants.Inadequate moisture can stress your plants, lead to blossom-end rot problems on tomatoes, and diminish your overall harvest.If you expect plenty of rain or intend to use overhead irrigation, your plants' roots may be able to get the moisture they need from the pathways.You might also consider removing the plastic in late July and replacing it with a water-permeable mulch, such as straw, newspaper or grass clippings.This mulch will allow rainwater and overhead irrigation to get down to the root zone, and will also help retain moisture.These mulches can lower soil temperatures by as much as 20 to 25 degrees, which may keep cool-weather plants producing right through the summer's heat.In hot climates, most crops will be happier and more productive with a soil-cooling mulch such as shredded leaves or straw.You may find your plants stunted from the cold, turning yellow from too much moisture, and being chomped by an army of slugs.This type of soil will usually dry out a bit as the season progresses, so don't cover it up with a thick, moisture-retentive mulch.Nor should a dry, sandy soil be covered with plastic mulch, because it would prevent rain and irrigation water from seeping down to the roots.Organic mulch, especially leaves and wheat straw, can rob the soil of nitrogen as it is decomposing

Best Potting Mix For Container Garden

Best Potting Mix For Container Garden

Almost any article on plants ends with "and make sure you use a good potting mix" - great advice, but what does it mean?A soil mix needs to settle around the roots of your plant and help hold it in place so that it doesn’t blow over from the first wind.However, it also needs to be light enough to allow water and air to always be present under the soil surface so your plant’s roots have a balanced atmosphere to grow in.You can do any of these things, but if you are making your own potting soil at home you will also need to change the way you water and fertilize in order to get the best results.Look for a potting soil made up of peat moss, pine bark and perlite or vermiculite Fertilizer may be added in the form of a "starter charge" or slow release formulation.Most potting soil you buy in a garden center are comprised of three basic ingredients: peat moss, pine bark, and either perlite or vermiculite (to provide air space).Peat moss provides a great moisture retaining quality with good air space for healthy growing roots.NOTE: If you buy a bag of straight peat moss and it is very dry, you may find that it repels water.If you run into this problem, the best thing you can do is soak the peat moss either in the bag you bought it in or in a wheelbarrow or bucket.Pine Bark comes from paper mills all over the United States and Canada and acts to provide some moisture and fertilizer retention, and also a bit more air space.That means that flouride concentrates after a while and can burn the leaf tips of some houseplants like Dracaena and spider plant (Chlorophytum).One problem that we have seen with this slow-release fertilizer is that if the bags of potting mix sit around for a long time or get wet and sit around, the fertilizer in the potting mix releases inside the bag, and then when you plant your flowers they burn up due to too much nitrogen (similar to the problems with using manure products).You will need to exercise a little extra care not to overwater your flowers when the temperatures are still cool since the soil will not dry out as quickly as you are used to.NOTE: Just because the potting mix is moist doesn’t mean the plant won’t need fertilizer, a lot of gardeners live where there is enough rain to keep the potting soil moist, however, you still need to make sure that the plant has regular fertilization to grow well.Raw wood products suck up all the available nitrogen from the soil as they break down and this means your plants look starved and yellow-green because they can’t get enough food to grow.They are great for decreasing water loss and if applied thick enough add some protection from annual weeds.If a potting soil is soaked it can begin to break down in the bag - losing all its air space, becoming compacted and is at risk for carrying root rot diseases besides being nearly impossible to get into your car.Unless you are growing cacti, adding sand (which provides anchorage and some air space) is usually not a great idea.If you live someplace with very high winds, a little sand can help hold plants in place, but in general it is not needed.When you break open the bag and use the mix, you are exposing that sterile soil to a huge assortment of native fungi spores that are ambient in your home and garden.Drying the soil mix out, exposure to sunlight and simply being exposed to other competitive organisms, the mildews disappear through rapid attrition.If you want to eliminate the mildew issue, open the bag a few days before you use it and spread it out on a sheet or cloth, expose it to the sunlight, and then re-bag or put it into a soil bin when it is dry.Also, cacti and succulents require better drainage than annual flowers and in many cases prefer clay pots as well.There are a lot of reasons for this and rather than making this into a physics lesson, just take my word for it - blend potting soils if you find yourself having to switch in the middle of a container

What Plants Like East Facing Windows

What Plants Like East Facing Windows

If your home gets a dash of the morning sun, then here are the Best Indoor Plants for East Facing Windows that you can grow!Get the best of the morning sunlight by growing these awesome Indoor Plants for East Facing Windows!This ornamental houseplant, with deeply lobed leaves, does well in bright indirect light and makes for an excellent east-facing window plant.You cannot keep this palm in the dark spot as it needs full-day bright indirect light and gentle morning sunlight.However, you can grow any variety you want.Grow hoya plant in a bright, airy location away from any exposure to direct sunlight.Botanical Name: Schefflera.Botanical Name: Calathea.Croton is admired for huge variation in the color and pattern of the leaves–place it near an east-facing window, where it receives bright morning sun and day-long indirect light.Grow silver-leafed Aluminum Plant on the east or north-facing window.Botanical Name: Fittonia.Grow Boston fern in hanging baskets for a beautiful visual appearance or display it on a windowsill.Botanical Name: Clivia.Colorful and bright clivias prefer a spot that gets the direct morning sunlight but shade in the afternoon.Botanical Name: Maranta.Botanical Name: Phalaenopsis.Orchids favor bright, indirect sunlight, and an east-facing window will do well for growing them indoors.Keep jade plants in bright shade in your home–an east-facing window that receives gentle direct sun in the morning would be a perfect spot!Place the false shamrock in an area with filtered bright to medium light away from direct sunlight.This tropical plant prefers bright indirect light, hence an east-facing window is a perfect spot for growing it.All ivy varieties prefer medium bright locations and an eastern exposure is ideal for the plant

How To Have A Container Garden

How To Have A Container Garden

It is a total myth that by adding gravel, pot shards, or stones to the bottom of your container garden, you will increase drainage.Unless you are a really attentive container gardener, who can water perfectly, or you have a plant that likes wet soil (and there are some that do), you need holes in your pots -- preferably lots of them

What Vegetables To Plant In Container Garden

What Vegetables To Plant In Container Garden

Keep in mind the larger the tomato variety the bigger the pot it will require.Make sure you harden off or gradually acclimate seedlings to outside living before you plant them

What Herbs Grow Best In Containers

What Herbs Grow Best In Containers

That way, when I’m in the middle of making dinner and realize I forgot to harvest a handful of basil or parsley, it’s only a few steps away.Of course, growing herbs in containers will also keep aggressive spreaders, like mint and lemon balm, under control and away from garden beds.Many gardeners struggle to grow great basil, but give it well-drained soil and plenty of sunshine and it’s usually smooth sailing.Like most herbs, basil responds well to frequent harvesting, and will continue to push out fresh growth when trimmed back.Oregano is an enthusiastic grower in the garden and putting it in a pot is an easy and beautiful way to control its growth.The small leaves are packed with flavor, perfect for topping homemade pizza and bruschetta, as well as adding to vinaigrettes and marinades.Rosemary is a woody shrub with aromatic, needle-like foliage that adds a welcome depth of flavor to roasted potatoes and chicken dishes.In my zone 5 garden, rosemary is an annual, but growing it in pots makes it easy to bring indoors to a sunny windowsill once the days start to cool down in mid-autumn.There are many cultivars of rosemary, with most growing upright, but a few do cascade down, making them perfect for the edges of pots and planters.I really like Gorizia, an upright cultivar with large leaves and Arp, which is a slightly more cold tolerant variety.Plus, it looks fantastic when planted at the front of a container where the tiny leaves can mound over the edge of the pot.We add the leaves to summer drinks, fruit salad, and also dry plenty for winter tea.Whether you’re growing vegetables, flowers, or herbs in pots, you’ll find the greatest success when you use containers with adequate drainage.Worm castings are also an easy way to boost soil nutrients and moisture retention and you only need to add a handful to containers as a little goes a long way.Certain herbs prefer very well-drained soil (thyme, oregano, rosemary), while others like more moisture (mint, coriander, lemon balm)

What Trees Are Good For Containers

What Trees Are Good For Containers

They typically have dark purple foliage, as well as white, pink, or red flowers, depending on the variety

How Deep Should A Raised Garden Bed For Tomatoes

How Deep Should A Raised Garden Bed For Tomatoes

The height measurement of your raised garden bed, which determines the depth, is an important one.Ideally you’d have at least another 18 inches (46 cm) of healthy soil underneath.How deep should a raised garden bed be?And, it’s possible to get boards that are a foot high.Tomatoes, for example, which benefit from being planted deeply, require about 24 to 36 inches (60 to 90 cm) of depth for their roots to grow.The case for building a shallow raised bed.Veggies can reach below the frame of the raised bed into the ground below, and grow healthy root systems beneath the garden.Beyond the accessibility benefits, they are also very deep, meaning plants have lots of space to grow.While they are less deep than a stock tank, for example, they are deep enough to grow an abundance of vegetables.Then, line the top half of the stock tank with landscape fabric.This means only filling about half the raised bed with soil.The bottom layer is strictly to fill up some of the space

How To Store Container Grown Potatoes

How To Store Container Grown Potatoes

Potatoes are one of the easiest vegetables to grow producing heavy yields of tasty tubers when planted in garden beds and containers.Plus, there’s so many awesome potato varieties to grow – from fingerlings to russets – in a rainbow of colors.In my zone 5B garden I harvest my storage potatoes in late September through October.Pick a dry day to harvest potatoes as moisture can spread disease and rot.I find it handy to keep a bowl nearby for damaged tubers which then head directly to the kitchen.Once you’ve harvested a few new potatoes, push the soil back in place and mound it around the plants.Once harvested, gently brush off caked on soil and allow them to dry off for an hour or so outdoors.After harvesting new potatoes from in-ground or container plants, feed them with a fish emulsion fertilizer to encourage healthy growth and more tubers.Once the potatoes have been harvested, I sow a cover crop or add a source of organic matter, like manure or compost, to the top of the bed.Planting these crops on a 3 year rotation cycle can reduce pests and soil-borne diseases.This helps the skin thicken up and extends the storage life of the tubers.To cure potatoes, lay them on newspaper, trays, or cardboard in a cool, dark spot (50 to 60 F, 10 to 15 C) with high humidity for one to two weeks.Once cured, move the potatoes (removing any that have signs of damage) to bushel baskets, cardboard boxes (with ventilation holes poked in the sides), low baskets, or brown paper bags.You can also find multiple drawer harvest storage at many garden supply stores.Check tubers regularly and remove any that show signs of rot or shrivelling.The thin skin that makes new potatoes so appealing limits their storage life to weeks not months.For a tutorial on when to harvest potatoes and how to do it right, check out this video by Savvy’s Jessica Walliser

Best Container Garden Soil

Best Container Garden Soil

One of the most important things a potting soil needs to do is provide roots access to air by letting water drain away from them.Perlite, vermiculite, calcined clay (kitty litter), and sand are the mineral aggregates most commonly used in potting soils.In addition to peat moss, vermiculite, and perlite, commercial mixes often contain sawdust or various grades of shredded bark.Lime may be added to help balance the acidity of the peat moss, and a small dose of fertilizer can often make up for the lack of nutrients

When To Plant Garden Pots

When To Plant Garden Pots

When there isn't a big enough hole or holes for water to get out of your pot, your soil becomes too wet and the roots of your plants can rot which causes the plant to die.It is a total myth that by adding gravel, pot shards, or stones to the bottom of your container garden, you will increase drainage

How To Water Potted Plants On Vacation

How To Water Potted Plants On Vacation

Then, take a nail and hammer it through the aluminum cap, creating five mini holes.To make sure you don’t warp the cap, start by nailing the hole from the inside of the cap.Step 2: Fill the bottle with water.Step 3: Place the bottle into soil.Step 3: Place your plants on the towel in the bath.Place plants in the tub or sink, making sure the plants are in pots with good drainage so the water can soak through the roots.This method should take care of the plant for up to a week.The system is also great for those with more than one plant as you can water multiple plants at a time.Make sure to get cotton rope because this is the most absorbent material that will easily transfer into the soil of the plants.You want the rope to have slack on the end inside the vase of water and also be able to reach several inches under the soil.Step 2: Place ends of rope in the soil and water.Step 3: Water plant and fill the vase.When looking for a saucer for your pot, you want to make sure it is close to the same size as the pot, or even slightly larger, so that the saucer has room to hold water and still touch the full bottom of the pot.Step 2: Place your plant in the pot.Water your plant as you usually would — do not over water.Step 3: Wrap your plant in the plastic bag.Wrap your plant inside the plastic bag, making sure that the stakes are placed well enough that the leaves are not touching the bag.Method Six: Plastic Water Bottle Planter.Not only humans drink from water bottles, but plants do as well, and it’s a great way to reuse plastic water bottles.Simply fill the bottle as needed!Step 2: Place the plastic bottle into the soil.Water the soil of your plant before so that your plant does not consume all the water from the bottle first, letting the self-watering method last longer.Place the plastic bottle into a hole in the soil with the cap and about an inch or two of the water bottle peeking out.Step 3: Fill up the water bottle.Fill the bottle with water and cap the bottle so the water does not evaporate and instead drains into the plant.Even though these plants do not need to be watered for periods at a time, it’s safer to put them out of direct light to make them last longer.Don’t worry too much if one plant looks droopy when you come back, there are methods to revive houseplants so that you don’t lose any of your plant friends for good!

When Should I Stop Watering Before Harvesting

When Should I Stop Watering Before Harvesting

In this article, you’ll learn how to harvest a Cannabis plant, how to dry and cure your buds.The flowering stage seems to be coming to an end and you are eager to harvest your plants as soon as possible.Check for pests and discard damaged parts (fungi, severe insect infestation).Flushing a Cannabis plant is basically to run a lot of water through its growing medium (soil, for example) to get rid of the excess of salt and mineral nutrients.This action forces your plant to use up any amount of nutrients previously absorbed.The excess of fertilizer in your Cannabis plant may result in buds that are harsh to the throat when smoked.Flushing with clean, room temperature water will help to get rid of fertilizer excess in the soil.Place a container (bucket or similar) under the pot for collecting the excess water, be careful or this may result in a bit of a mess.Regarding the amount of water needed, a good rule is to calculate up to 3 times the volume of the pot.A good visual sign is that, in the beginning, the water coming from the bottom of the pot will be dark and will gradually turn to a lighter color.By running this process once in each plant, most of the salt buildup should flush away from the substrate.Depending on the size of the pot, you can stop watering 1-3 days before harvesting.It is important to use this information as a guide to starting checking our plants, but dates may vary along with cultivation methods, environmental factors, etc.Pistils are those little “hairs.” They start white and as the plant ripens, they get darker and curling until they are brown.Trichomes are little resin glands (that “frost”) and they also change color as they ripen.– After that, pistils start turning orange, brown, or even pink and they stay “upright”.– When harvesting time is near, there’s a majority of orange or brown pistils and they have curled inwards the buds.This may also happen due to environmental factors even when the Cannabis plant is not yet ready for harvesting.It’s a good indicator to start looking at the trichomes: that’s the perfect way to know if the plant is ready.Pistils may change color because of environmental modifications such as high humidity and not necessarily because the plant is ready to harvest.Cut out big fan leaves, especially if they show signs of pests (insects, mold, fungi).Depending on the size of the buds and the relative humidity of your drying space, you can leave them bigger or smaller.If the buds are laying on a surface like a drying rack, rotate them every now and then so they keep their shape.You can log information such as harvesting dates and weights in the Grow with Jane tracking app!Make sure the room is dark, and the exhaust fan is running if drying in the growing tent

How To Water Pot Plants Automatically

How To Water Pot Plants Automatically

It’s convenient because containers are compact and can easily be moved as seasons and needs change.They also allow you to have more control over pests, diseases, and weeds that plague traditional gardens.However, keeping container plants properly watered presents a unique challenge to many gardeners.Overly wet soil causes roots to rot and invites pests and diseases.Test the moisture level below the surface by sticking your finger about an inch deep into the soil.Water droplets on the leaves will also increase the chance of plants being burned by the sun.Evening hours are cooler, but water on the leaves overnight increases the chance of fungal issues developing.Early morning hours are generally considered the best time to water your plants.I rely upon an automatic hose timer so my plants can be watered deeply on a regular schedule.You will want to make sure the wick is wet before it is placed in the container so it will properly transfer water to the roots of your plant.Watering globes are available commercially, but the same effect can be accomplished with glass or plastic bottles.The long necks can reach deep into the soil and provide stability to keep the bottle upright.They connect directly into your garden spigot and are run for a certain length of time to ensure all plants meet their watering needs.Once you have determined how long to run the drip irrigation, you will need to check the moisture levels in your containers daily.Containers with similar watering needs should be grouped together into their own “zone.” A zone is one individual line of your irrigation system.The timer will allow you to program your irrigation needs to run at a specific time at the interval that you choose.Micro sprayers are similar to drip irrigation, except that tiny sprinklers are installed along the line.The sprayers distribute a fan of water across the base of the plant, covering a wider area of the container than a drip would.Micro sprayers distribute more water in a shorter period than drip irrigation, but still at a rate that the soil can easily absorb the moisture.Determine the duration and frequency of your watering for micro sprayers like how you would for drip irrigation.You’ll find the duration will be shorter since more water is being distributed, but frequency should stay close to the same.Kits are available that make installing drip irrigation and micro sprayers easy.Keeping your container vegetable garden properly watered doesn’t need to be complicated or time-consuming

How To Care For Potted Roses In Winter

How To Care For Potted Roses In Winter

I should know, I was once in this situation myself, and until I discovered the following methods, I have lost many beautiful roses to the harshness of winter.The methods presented below are not perfect, but they tend to work in the majority of all cases provided that the instructions are followed as they are written, and as such, I would not plant a prized rose in a container because there is still a likelihood that even if the instructions are followed, a rose may still not come back after a really harsh winter.The main problem with this method is that it is very difficult to bury, and later in the Spring, to lift out, larger roses that are planted in large containers.Then you remove any dead or dying leaves remaining on the bush and move them indoors to an unheated location that receives very little light.Because most garages and sheds are sheltered locations, most of the time they remain warm enough to prevent the plant from freezing.Second, in the case of us urban gardeners, such as those of us that live in apartment complexes or in row style townhouses, there is simply the absence of any unheated indoor space to move any roses to for the winter.This is the trickiest method as it is the most detailed, but before I explain, let me make a few statements that add a few conditions to some of the rules normally found online about planting roses in containers.While budded roses should pull through the cold just fine, mature, own root roses have a better chance of surviving an unusually cold winter as they can return from their roots in the event of their canes significantly dying back.This rule applies not just to roses, but to almost every other woody ornamental plant that is to be overwintered outdoors in a container.Leave an addition 6” or more of space from the soil line to the top of your pots to be filled with mulch or compost for the winter to provide greater insulation from freezing and to provide the greatest possible protection of drying out from the winter.This is achieved to pruning the canes of your Hybrid Tea, Grandiflora, and Floribunda Roses back to about 18 to 24 inches in length, and by cutting your Climbers and Large Shrubs in half.This helps to prevent desiccation as mentioned above, especially in the event of your roses breaking dormancy during a winter warm spell.This resin is similar to the wax that your bare root roses are covered in when they are shipped to your home.Wilt Stop is an all-natural resin, is completely biodegradable, and is soluble in warm water.As a result, Wilt Stop and most other commercially available anti-desiccants will need to be reapplied in the winter if we experience a day of over 40 degrees with heavy rain for it to remain effective.Place them up against your house or a wood plank fence or brick wall if possible.If this is not possible, like would happen if a deck, porch, or chain link fence is in the way, then you must create a loose wind break.Prematurely moving roses out of this pen, even if they are breaking dormancy, can result in the death of the plants in the event of a late freeze.The roses in pots cannot be allowed to have their roots dry out as the plant then runs the risk of death from desiccation.If the day temperatures are above freezing during the winter, and there is no snow cover on your pots, and it hasn’t rained in a week or more, crack out the garden hose and provide your plants with a through watering

What Are The Best Perennials For Containers

What Are The Best Perennials For Containers

With so many varieties of perennials to choose from for sun and shade, it's now possible to create combinations that are just as appealing and colorful as those made with annuals alone, and the best part is that you don't have to replant them every year.Maybe you can identify with the idea of not wanting to spend the time and money on new container plantings every year.It gives the gardener a head start of at least a month over those planting only annuals because perennials can handle colder weather.Design your container plantings to coordinate with the seasons, so you have something in bloom for spring, summer, and fall.Hosta 'Praying Hands' is an excellent container perennial with upright stems and uniquely folded leaves.Here's a step-by-step guide to help you through each step of the process, from choosing a container, to knowing which perennials to use, to how to maintain and overwinter them.Imitation clay pots, which are actually made of a sturdy type of foam, are very attractive and lightweight.First, perennials have larger root systems than annuals, so they require more space to grow well.When choosing a container, try to coordinate the pot type and color with the surroundings it which it will be placed.If you are planning on using the pots in the garden amongst other plants, you may want to use one that is made of a natural material, such as wood, to help it blend in with its surroundings.For example, a basket of flowers would look more appropriate on the porch of a cottage style house than would a tall, stately urn.If you want it to stand out as an architectural element, choose a large container with an interesting shape that contrasts with its surroundings (ie.Good drainage is absolutely essential for your containerized perennials unless you are trying to create a water garden.If the pot you choose does not have a hole in the bottom, make one yourself with a drill (there are special bits that can cut into just about any material) or don't use it.Some materials that work well for this include landscape fabric (trim to fit bottom of pot) or self-adhesive fiberglass drywall joint tape.Since daily watering slowly flushes the nutrients out of the soil, it's a good idea to supplement with small amounts of liquid fertilizer a couple of months after potting up the containers.You will know it's time to add fertilizer when your normally healthy plants begin to show signs of decline (leaves will appear light green or slightly yellow).Heuchera PRIMO® 'Black Pearl' has dark foliage all season long that compliments just about any perennial you put with it, or use it as a stand alone.The choice of plant material is critical to good design when working in small spaces like containers.When working with perennials, understand that the flowers are a secondary point of interest because, unlike annuals, they appear only for a limited amount of time."Thrillers" are the plants that command attention, like the tall spike in the center of a pot of geraniums.With perennials, since the blooms are not typically present for a long period, thrillers are usually plants with interesting architectural shape or colored foliage.For example, a single mature hosta in a large pot is stunning, especially when surrounded by containers of combination plantings.Because of root constraints, most perennials (especially the larger ones) will not grow to their mature size in a container like they would in the ground.Shade plantings rely heavily on interesting foliage because they typically do not bloom as long as their sunny counterparts.If the root ball is a solid mass, make a few vertical slits in it with a knife and splay it out in the new container.Press the soil firmly around the roots to eliminate any large air pockets and then water thoroughly.Also, as discussed under "Choosing a Container" above, the material the pot is made of will have an effect on how often the plants need to be watered.This helps to dissolve and wash away any build up of salts in the soil, a common problem in containers.Potting soil is often difficult to re-wet once it has been allowed to dry out, making it impossible for it to provide moisture for the roots.To maintain their best appearance and to promote rebloom, keep the plants deadheaded (remove spent blossoms).Supplement with a weak solution of liquid fertilizer every 3-4 weeks to keep your plants healthy and happy.Give them fresh, nutrient-packed soil with some slow-release fertilizer mixed in and they will reward you with vigorous, healthy new growth.Chances are, if you have taken the time to design, plant, and tend your perennial container garden all season long, you are going to want to overwinter it.Some gardeners choose to treat perennials like annuals, however, and simply toss them out after the season is over.Others choose to transplant their containerized perennials into the garden for the winter and then start over fresh with new plants in the spring.This is because there is a larger volume of soil in a bigger pot to help insulate the roots, protecting them from freezing and desiccating.In warmer climates or those with a reliable, thick layer of snow cover, perennials are generally easier to overwinter.In the north and in places with unreliable snow cover, it requires more work to get them to pull through the winter.Regardless of your climate, containerized perennials should be watered thoroughly just before the ground freezes to give them a reserve supply to use during warm winter spells.You can also add a few handfuls of snow to the top of the container occasionally throughout the winter (if overwintering under cover); this will provide supplemental water for the plants if the temperatures rise enough for it to melt.Avoid this scenario by overwintering your containerized perennials tipped on their side so water cannot accumulate at the top of the pot, or overwinter them under cover where they will not receive much water during winter or early spring before the soil thaws.The general consensus seems to be that the best way to overwinter containerized perennials is to take the entire pot and bury it in the ground.You can overwinter them by moving the pots into a cold frame or unheated garage for the winter after the first hard frost.Since all perennials require a period of dormancy or a cold treatment to bloom, don't overwinter them in a greenhouse or other warm place where they will not go dormant.If you are overwintering your containers outside, place a grouping of pots as close together as possible in a sheltered site on the ground.Do not overwinter the containers on pavement or any other surface (such as a deck) raised above ground level.Containerized perennials left exposed on higher levels during the winter have little chance of overwintering successfully.Try mounding leaves or evergreen boughs on top of the pots, followed by a thick layer of snow.If snow is not reliable in your area, use an insulating blanket made expressly for this purpose

What Soil Is Best For Tomatoes In Pots

What Soil Is Best For Tomatoes In Pots

The best soil for tomatoes in container is a loose soil like sandy loam – aerated, well-drained but moisture-retaining, packed full of organic matter, nutrients, a higher level of phosphorus & potassium, and a slightly acidic pH level between 6 to 6.8.– Get our Top pick of Soil Mix for Tomatoes – Foxfarm Ocean Forest Organic Soil Mix.How much Soil do Tomatoes need in Containers?A wider container is suitable for growing tomatoes because tomato roots grow out more than deep.A soil depth of 8-12 inches is ideal for growing tomatoes in containers.TIP When transplanting young tomato plants into pots or containers, make sure you plant them at least 3-4 inches deep.Roots will grow out from the stem under the soil and make the plant stronger.What is the Best pH of Soil for Tomatoes?3.2 Should you check Soil pH before planting Tomatoes?Yes, I would recommend you to test the pH level before transplanting your tomatoes.What is the Best Soil for Tomatoes in Container?The best soil for tomatoes in pots or containers is a loose soil which can hold water preventing the plants from drying out, rich in potassium & phosphorus with a pH level close to neutral.TIP Tomatoes gain their flavor from the soil they are planted it in, so make sure you plant your tomatoes in a nutrient-rich healthy soil.A loose soil is ideal for tomato plants which helps healthy root development.pH level: The ideal pH level for tomatoes is 6.0 to 6.8.Make your own Soil Buy Ready Potting Mix.So, the first option is to make your own soil mix for tomatoes.Mix the following ingredients well to prepare your mix.25% Perlite (prevents soil from compacting over time).(provides food to the plants).Soil Mix Overview Foxfarm Soil Mix.– Organic mix.– Organic Grade Fertilizer.– Mix well in a large container so there is enough room for expansion Check on Amazon Espoma Soil Mix.All soil mixes listed above are great options for growing tomatoes in containers, FoxFarm Ocean Forest Mix being out best choice.You can add additional fertilizer to support the plant’s growth.5.1 When to add fertilizer to tomatoes in containers?If you are using a fertilized potting mix, do not add any additional fertilizer when transplanting the young tomato plants.Add fertilizers after 2 weeks or just when the plants start producing tomatoes.5.2 What Fertilizer is Best for Tomatoes in Containers?– No animal product* If you are using a rich potting mix, add 1 cup after at least 2 weeks since transplant.* If you are using generic potting soil, sprinkle half a handful at the time of transplant, apply once every month.Use loose nutrient-rich soil, break up any clumps, remove any twigs or rocks, add compost, add potassium & phosphorus rich fertilizer, add bone meal, add some neem cake which acts as bugs repellent & fertilizer.Is potting soil good for tomatoes?Yes, you can nutrients rich potting soil for growing tomatoes.Is Epsom salt good for tomatoes?Yes, banana peels are a good source of phosphorus and potassium which are very essential nutrients for growing healthy tomatoes.Is Bone meal good for tomato plants?Bone meal is a great source of phosphorus and also contains calcium, both of which are helpful to tomato plants.Yes, orange peels are a good source of Nitrogen (N) which helps foliage growth.Are eggshells good for tomato plants?Tea leaves are a good source of nitrogen and other nutrients; it has an NPK of 4.15-0.62-0.4