They can be a beneficial addition to many communities by increasing the availability of nutritious foods, strengthening community ties, reducing environmental hazards, reducing food miles and creating a more sustainable system.Humans, plants and animals can all benefit from urban agriculture since it creates habitats and improves the ecology of the area.The addition of gardens to these areas may improve nutrition and increase the consumption of fruits and vegetables.Residents in areas with high crime rates may experience cardiovascular disease and mental health disorders.The consequences of vacant lands are decreased property values, drug use, and the illegal dumping of litter, tires and chemicals [6].Gardens can improve economic opportunities by training volunteers and selling food at farmers’ markets [1].Urban agriculture can teach residents useful skills in planning, food production and business.Recently, there has been a resurgence of community gardens to help mitigate the impacts of food deserts and as a use for the increased number of vacant lands present in urban areas.Community gardens can provide fresh, healthy produce for residents and allow them to reduce their food bills.The USDA’s Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service has implemented a grant program to help decrease the impact of food deserts in low-income communities.They strive to provide long-term food security by supporting local agriculture projects while also improving economic, social and environmental problems.The Chicago Park District along with People’s Gas help provides resources to community gardens.These gardens rely on volunteers and include both native edible and ornamental plants.Community Food Security Coalition’s North American Initiative on Urban Agriculture.More Than Just An Eyesore: Local Insights And Solutions on Vacant Land And Urban Health. .

Community Garden Mission – Siskiyou Gardens, Parks and

To promote the health and well being of participants with special needs by providing accessible gardening space, ergonomic tools, and programs designed to encourage physical strength and mental balance. .

Benefits of Community Gardening

Community gardens give the neighborhood a prettier aesthetic and provide opportunities for people to learn from.A community garden is a natural space where neighbors come together to plant flowers, fruit, vegetables, and herbs.They are especially popular in urban areas where grocery stores may be few and far between, and opportunities to connect with nature are rare.However, a vacant lot can be transformed into a thriving green space where people gather to learn and grow at least some of their own food.Even in suburban and rural areas, community gardens are critical for bringing neighbors together to share meaningful experiences.Even private landowners can participate when they donate all or at least a portion of their property to a community gardening effort.However, a community garden creates a green, living space where birds and beneficial insects congregate.Especially in urban neighborhoods, it can be challenging to regularly obtain fresh produce without having to drive many miles.This means that people do not eat a healthy and nutritious diet because obtaining produce simply is too time-consuming and costly.However, when there is a community garden in a neighborhood, studies have demonstrated that people consume more fresh fruits and vegetables.Being active in the outdoors is a wonderful way to help avoid being sedentary, which is a major contributor to obesity.People who might otherwise have been cooped up at home, leading a solitary life, are brought out into the community where they can interact with others.When people take a plot in a community garden, they foster a sense of ownership and begin to feel more personally invested in their neighborhood.Moreover, working together in the garden may be a great way to discuss environmental issues and how to live a healthier life.Accordingly, a community garden is a place that helps people to relieve stress and increase their overall sense of wellness.Whether you are living in an urban landscape or elsewhere, community gardening is an excellent opportunity to connect with nature and your neighbors. .

Community gardens

Gardens can include physical infrastructure, ranging from a simple shed for tools to raised beds, hoop houses, greenhouses, and cold frames.More involved infrastructure might include community gathering places, produce stands, and food preparation areas.If the appearance of the garden is important (for example, it’s on a busy street corner or located on public property), consider building raised beds.Importing soil from elsewhere can be a way to speed up the time to a productive vegetable garden.Importing soil from elsewhere can be a way to speed up the time to a productive vegetable garden.This leads to poor water infiltration, and issues with drainage and air flow–which impedes plant growth.Paving bricks allow for good mobility and are permeable to allow rain and snowmelt to reach the soil underneath.Mulch paths with woodchips (often free from local arborists) to prevent weed growth and keep down dust, especially if the soil is contaminated.The right garden design can make watering easier, whether that means beds that are all the same size so they all take the same length of drip tape, beds that a sprinkler can easily cover, or a nice wide path for pulling the hose.In many cities, you can build a shed with a roof area less than 120 square feet without a permit.Fences control access, so think carefully about who you want to feel welcomed to the garden.Fences can help you control when people have access to your garden and may provide some safety.Still, other experience shows that beautiful tomatoes and heads of broccoli might disappear regardless of the presence of fences.Controlling access of animals, whether deer, rabbits, gophers, turkeys, or geese, requires specialized fencing and possibly netting.In particular, fencing in poultry and duck areas to prevent predation from raccoons, hawks, and possums can be a bit of an art.Check local regulations carefully to make sure you meet food safety and vending requirements.Community gathering and education spaces at urban farms can be anything from meeting areas to amphitheaters to outdoor classrooms.This can be a simple picnic table for garden meetings and sharing food or a more developed area for community events.Restrooms and handwashing stations are a good idea and required by the city as you add in food preparation areas and community gathering spaces.If your city is not “up to speed,” consider getting involved in helping to write local legislation that works in favor of urban farmers and gardeners.Learn more about keeping your raised beds healthy, and watch a video about soil compaction! .

What Is a Community Garden

And although a garden can be a lot of work, it more than pays for itself in tender lettuce and juicy, homegrown tomatoes that taste far superior to anything you can buy at the supermarket.And yet at the same time, many cities are dotted with vacant lots – perfectly good land sitting unused and filling up with ugly debris.They make it possible for many people to enjoy a resource – in this case, land for gardening – that they couldn’t afford on their own.Many urban neighborhoods are “food deserts” – places where it’s nearly impossible to buy fresh fruits and vegetables.Community gardens provide fresh, nutritious produce for many families who couldn’t otherwise afford it, improving their diet and their overall health.Many urban neighborhoods are “food deserts” – places where it’s nearly impossible to buy fresh fruits and vegetables.Community gardens provide fresh, nutritious produce for many families who couldn’t otherwise afford it, improving their diet and their overall health.Urban gardening gives city dwellers a chance to enjoy fresh air and healthy outdoor exercise.They also provide a peaceful retreat from the noise and bustle of an urban neighborhood, easing stress for residents.Urban gardening gives city dwellers a chance to enjoy fresh air and healthy outdoor exercise.They also provide a peaceful retreat from the noise and bustle of an urban neighborhood, easing stress for residents.They also absorb rainwater, reducing the amount of runoff that runs through the streets and carries pollutants into rivers and lakes.Many community gardens also take part in composting, recycling plant waste such as leaves and tree trimmings into useful fertilizer.They also absorb rainwater, reducing the amount of runoff that runs through the streets and carries pollutants into rivers and lakes.Many community gardens also take part in composting, recycling plant waste such as leaves and tree trimmings into useful fertilizer.Gardeners also feel more personally invested in the places where they live, gaining sense of ownership and community spirit.And because they get people out of their apartments where they can keep an eye on the street, community gardens can help reduce crime in the surrounding neighborhood.Gardeners also feel more personally invested in the places where they live, gaining sense of ownership and community spirit.And because they get people out of their apartments where they can keep an eye on the street, community gardens can help reduce crime in the surrounding neighborhood.In the heart of the New York City neighborhood known as Hell’s Kitchen nestles a patch of green called the Clinton Community Garden.This 15,000-square-foot lot contains 110 individual garden plots, as well as a public area with a lawn and beds of flowers and herbs.Through the garden wind paths of salvaged brick, flanked by benches made from concrete blocks and slabs of reclaimed slate.In 1978, the spot where the Clinton Community Garden now sits was a vacant lot, owned by the city and abandoned for 28 years.However, a few residents spotted some wild tomato plants growing out of the rubble and had the idea that this trash heap could become a garden.A year later, they leased the lot from the city and began planting flowers, herbs, vegetables, and fruits.In 1981, the garden was thriving, but so was the city’s real estate market, and developers saw the 15,000-square-foot lot as a prime building site.The city was preparing to sell it, so the residents went into action, starting a “Square-Inch Campaign” to raise funds and buy the property.Mayor Ed Koch joined the fight, making the first $5 pledge to save one square inch of the garden space.The organization has a detailed set of bylaws explaining who can be a member, how the officers are elected, and what their powers and responsibilities are.The waiting list for garden beds has nearly 100 people on it, with applications stretching back over six years.Only residents of the immediate neighborhood – between 34th and 57th Streets, from the west side of Eighth Avenue to the Hudson River – are eligible to claim a plot.Clinton Community Garden is open to the public 20 hours each week, on weekends and sometimes early on Wednesday mornings.They can do a bit of work in their plots during this time, but they have to keep most of their attention on the front garden area and the people in it.Include both people and local organizations – such as community groups, gardening societies, and homeowners’ and tenants’ associations – in the conversation.If necessary, assign specific people to particular jobs, such as funding, publicity, and preparing the garden site.Measure the site and draw out a simple scale map that you can use to plan out the location of different components, such as garden beds and paths.Some other nice elements to include are flower beds, fruit trees, and a community bulletin board.Another possible feature is a special garden area just for kids, who are usually more interested in the process of digging and planting than in the size of the harvest.Possible sponsors for a community garden include churches, local businesses, and your town’s department of parks and recreation.Possible sponsors for a community garden include churches, local businesses, and your town’s department of parks and recreation.While you’re working on budgeting, talk to an accountant or a lawyer to find out whether there are any tax issues that could affect your community garden.Even before you’ve worked out all the details for your design or raised all the money you need to build the garden, you can get started preparing the site for planting.Get the rest of the gardeners involved in this process, since people are more likely to follow rules they have helped to create.Also, decide who is responsible for caring for the shared areas of the garden, such as weeding paths and mowing lawns.Now that you have your funds in hand, your site prepared, and your rules laid out, your community garden is ready to open for business.Invite visitors to tour the garden, and share updates through town bulletin boards or social media networks.You can even throw a party to celebrate the “grand opening” of your garden and recognize all the people who helped make it happen.Continue to meet regularly to review your garden plan and make any changes as needed, based on what you have learned or on feedback from the neighbors.It can take months of hard work and planning before your garden project finally bears fruit – or vegetables, as the case may be. .

Does participating in community gardens promote sustainable

The JArDinS study is part of the ongoing SURFOOD-Foodscapes project evaluating the effects of urban foodscape on food styles in the Montpellier Metropole (France).The JArDinS study is the work package addressing the impact of urban gardening on sustainable lifestyles.Baseline sample size was estimated based on a priori power analysis considering household supply of F&V as the primary outcome.The hypothesis was derived from our knowledge of the food supply content of community gardeners vs. non-gardeners, based on data collected in a cross-sectional study previously conducted in the south of France [17].Assuming a potential attrition rate of 30% and a correlation of 0.6 across repeated measures, a total of 160 participants is required to detect a 30% increase in F&V supply in the new gardeners group (namely one portion of F&V) for 80% power at the 5% alpha level.A home visit is then be scheduled for those interested in the study, during which further explanation of requirements, data collection procedures, security and confidentiality of the information gathered is given.The exclusion criteria are: past experience of at least one household member in community gardening, and never shopping for home groceries.A first home visit will be scheduled to provide participants with data collection materials (a food supply diary, a hip-worn triaxial accelerometer and an online questionnaire), together with instructions on how to use it.For the control group, the food supply diary will be completed as part of the “Mont’Panier” survey, with the possibility of receiving it in printed form or online.Participants will receive a 15 € voucher at t 0 and at t 1 for returning all data collection materials duly completed.When grocery and supermarket till receipts are available, participants will be asked to collect them in an envelope at the back of the food supply diary.The MAR is an indicator of good nutritional quality and represents the mean percentage of daily recommended intakes for 20 key nutrients.The Actigraph is a motion sensor that measure acceleration from body movements in three orthogonal planes (anteroposterior, mediolateral, and vertical) [32].Participants will be instructed to wear the Actigraph fitted with an elastic strap on the right side of the hip for 9 consecutive days, except for bathing and performing activities in water.The automatic activity-recognition algorithm relies on four signal features from time and frequency domains to classify 6 s consecutive time spans into six posture/activity categories: a) lying down, b) slouching, c) sitting, d) standing still, e) moving on foot (sweeping, treading, walking, running, etc.Online RPAQ has been found to provide a good estimate of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity in ten European countries including France [35].Social health Perceived social isolation or loneliness can impair physical and mental health by influencing psychological processes that alter physiological functioning, reduce sleep quality, and increase morbidity and mortality [38].Environmental impact of household’s food supplies Greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE, in grams of carbon dioxide equivalents, g CO 2 eq), atmospheric acidification (in grams of sulphur dioxide equivalents, g SO 2 eq) and marine eutrophication (in grams of nitrogen equivalents, g Neq) related to the household’s food supply will be computed using estimates from the French ‘SUStable’ table [40].The GHGE related to food trips will then be calculated using the French government’s methodology (decree No.Briefly, the distance travelled for food purchase will be computed depending on the mode of transport (walking, cycling, car, motorbike, tram and bus).Summary statistics (mean, median, standard deviation and frequency distribution) will be generated for baseline characteristics.Data will be analysed to address the research questions, applying appropriate linear mixed models.

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Community gardening

Community gardens can be created on private or public land, where citizens can grow fruits, fine herbs, flowers, but mainly vegetables.Around the world, community gardens exist in various forms, it can be located in the proximity of neighborhood, in balconies or rooftops, its size varies greatly from one to another.[4] They are publicly functioning in terms of ownership, access, and management,[5] as well as typically owned in trust by local governments or not for profit associations.Non-profits in many major cities offer assistance to low-income families, children's groups, and community organizations by helping them develop and grow their own gardens.In the UK and the rest of Europe, the similar "allotment gardens" can have dozens of plots, each measuring hundreds of square meters and rented by the same family for generations.Community gardens are often used in cities to provide fresh vegetables and fruits in "food deserts," which are urban neighborhoods where grocery stores are rare and residents may rely on processed food from convenience stores, gas stations, and fast-food restaurants.Community gardens may help alleviate one effect of climate change, which is expected to cause a global decline in agricultural output, making fresh produce increasingly unaffordable.[7] Community gardens are also an increasingly popular method of changing the built environment in order to promote health and wellness in the face of urbanization.The built environment has a wide range of positive and negative effects on the people who work, live, and play in a given area, including a person's chance of developing obesity [8] Community gardens encourage an urban community's food security, allowing citizens to grow their own food or for others to donate what they have grown.[7][9] Advocates say locally grown food decreases a community's reliance on fossil fuels for transport of food from large agricultural areas and reduces a society's overall use of fossil fuels to drive in agricultural machinery.Community gardens improve users’ health through increased fresh vegetable consumption and providing a venue for exercise.[15] Because of their health and recreational benefits, community gardens may be included in public parks, similar to ball fields or playgrounds.Historically, community gardens have also served to provide food during wartime or periods of economic depression.Neighborhood gardens are the most common type, where a group of people come together to grow fruits, vegetables and ornamental plants.They are identifiable as a parcel of private or public land where individual plots are rented by gardeners for a monthly or annual fee.are the most common type, where a group of people come together to grow fruits, vegetables and ornamental plants.They are identifiable as a parcel of private or public land where individual plots are rented by gardeners for a monthly or annual fee.Residential Gardens are typically shared among residents in apartment communities, assisted living, and affordable housing units.are typically shared among residents in apartment communities, assisted living, and affordable housing units.Institutional Gardens are attached to either public or private organizations and offer numerous beneficial services for residents.Benefits include mental or physical rehabilitation and therapy, as well as teaching a set of skills for job-related placement.Benefits include mental or physical rehabilitation and therapy, as well as teaching a set of skills for job-related placement.Exposure to a community garden is much more likely for an individual if they are able to walk or drive to the location, as opposed to public transportation.Individual plots can be used as "virtual" backyards, each highly diverse, creating a "quilt" of flowers, vegetables and folk art.Some community gardens “self-support” through membership dues, and others require a sponsor for tools, seeds, or money donations.In Santa Clara, California a non-profit by the name of Appleseeds[29] offers free assistance in starting up new community gardens around the world.Community gardens have been shown to have positive health effects on those who participate in the programs, particularly in the areas of decreasing body mass index and lower rates of obesity.A 2013 study found that 17% of obese or overweight children improved their body mass index over seven weeks.[33] In these programs, gardening lessons were accompanied by nutrition and cooking classes and optional parent engagement.A study found that community gardeners in Utah had a lower body mass index than their non-gardening siblings and unrelated neighbors.[34] Administrative records were used to compare body mass indexes of community gardeners to that of unrelated neighbors, siblings, and spouses.Participation in a community garden has been shown to increase both availability and consumption of fruits and vegetables in households.A study showed an average increase in availability of 2.55 fruits and 4.3 vegetables with participation in a community garden.In particular, zoning laws--which incentivize or deincentivize land development--strongly impact the possibility of community gardens.For example, New York State reached a settlement in 2002 which protected hundreds of community gardens which had been established by the Parks and Recreation Department GreenThumb Program from future development.The city of Detroit created agricultural zones in 2013 in the middle of urban areas to legitimize the over 355 “illegal” community gardens.Strong family ties often keep them from retiring to the countryside, and so urban community gardens are in great demand.Flood-prone river banks and other areas unsuitable for urban construction often become legal or illegal community gardens.It is also likely to perform a dual function as an open space or play area (in which role it may also be known as a 'city park') and—while it may offer plots to individual cultivators—the organisation that administers the garden will normally have a great deal of the responsibility for its planting, landscaping and upkeep. .

Community Gardens: Definition, Benefits, Rules & Best Practices

Weeding a garden is particularly effective in stress relief and provides mental health benefits to participants.Learning about the ways plants grow and the best conditions to help them thrive can provide the mental and intellectual stimulation of cultivating a new skill.Also, a community garden can change the culture of a neighborhood by providing a shared interest and activity that brings people together.The environment of a community is improved by having an element of natural beauty so that rather than empty lots in some neighborhoods, the space between buildings can be filled with flowers or even food. .

Community Gardens

City of Boise recognizes community gardens as a valuable recreational activity that contribute to community development, environmental awareness, and positive social interaction, and that support increased local food production and food security.To encourage the development and maintenance of community gardens, Boise Parks and Recreation Department collaborates with residents to develop community gardens on select city-owned property.Boise Parks and Recreation Department also offers a community garden manual to support you and your group in the development, management, and expectations of community gardens located on select city-owned properties.The purpose of the community garden manual is to make clear the expectations that are involved with starting and managing a community garden on property owned or managed by Boise Parks and Recreation Department. .

The development of a model of community garden benefits to

From April to August 2015, a model depicting the many benefits of community garden participation was prepared based on a global, critical literature review. .

C B C W D C C C T

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