What Do I Need To Lay Garden Slabs

What Do I Need To Lay Garden Slabs

Take a number of wooden pegs (600mm tall and pointed at one end is ideal – these can either be made or purchased).Hammer a row of these marked pegs – spread at 1m intervals – across the highest side of the site.Use a long piece of timber as a straight edge to make sure that all of the pegs are level with each other and remedy if not.Measure and cut a small strip of wood to the required drop in height of the patio per metre.A level reading confirms that the peg has been hammered into the ground at the correct depth for the fall

How Can We Help With Food Insecurity

How Can We Help With Food Insecurity

So no matter what you're able to do in your community—volunteer, donate, advocate, organize—any work put toward food justice gets us one step closer to overcoming the problem for good

What To Grow In Community Garden

What To Grow In Community Garden

If you’re not careful, these challenges can make community garden plots feel more like a burden than a joy.I learned a lot about what vegetables work best in a community garden setting, and which ones to leave off the list each season.For example, a kale seedling gets planted in early spring and basically hangs out in the garden producing food until winter when it gets killed by heavy frosts if you live in a cold climate.If you don’t, you’ll end up with a harvest basket full of beans that are too big and too tough to be delicious.These low maintenance plants are great for growing in your community garden because the ripe fruit (or vegetable!).While you don’t want to let your cabbage languish alone in your garden for weeks, if you’re out of town for a few days when it’s ready to harvest this patient plant will wait for you to return.My favorite thing to do with my cabbage harvest is to ferment it into sauerkraut and curtido, which is very easy once you understand the process.But, unlike pretty much every other vegetable, you need to make sure you’re planting it in the fall and then you’ll harvest it the next summer.You can plant it early in spring and it will produce plenty of kale leaves for the entire season.Leeks are a long season vegetable, which means they will take about 110 days from planting until harvest.When choosing which vegetables are “worth it” to grow in your garden you need to understand how long it takes to get a harvest.This might not be allowed in a community garden setting, so annual herbs like parsley are a smart choice.My suggestion is to buy a parsley plant from your local garden store in spring instead of trying to start seeds.Sweet peppers can be expensive to buy at the grocery store, so they’re definitely one of the vegetables that give you the most bang for your buck.And, you can grow fun colors you can’t find in the grocery store, like purple, blue, and pink.You simply cut some off with a knife when you’re ready to cook with it and the plant will get back to the work of growing new leaves to replace them.Rainbow chard adds some pretty pops of color to complement the various shades of green in your garden

Best Community Garden In Us

Best Community Garden In Us

In an increasingly developed world, community gardens encourage skills and values that are sometimes lost in urban areas: tending to the land, promoting sustainability, maintaining a shared space, working toward a common goal.The garden was established in 2009 and today delivers to numerous organizations, including the Salvation Army, Denton County Food Bank, and Fred Moore Day Care Center.Volunteers of all ages put in over 500 collective hours each month, learning lifelong skills around growing techniques and sustainability measures while doing good for their community.Victory gardens were created during wartime as Americans faced food shortages, providing space where families could grow their own produce.There are more than 500 plots in the Fenway Victory Gardens spread across 7.5 acres of Boston’s Emerald Necklace, the city’s famous park network designed by the father of American landscape architecture, Frederick Law Olmsted.Locals of all backgrounds are invited to rent plots, which are currently tended by community members from families to seniors to church groups, of which the latter donates much of its yield to feeding the hungry.Alemany Farm benefits the community in several ways, from providing ecological education to promoting food security.Volunteers are invited to take fresh produce home with them after a long day in the garden, and leftover food is donated to locals and organizations like the Free Farm Stand.Additionally, the Virginia Avenue garden supports the community by donating extra produce and raising funds for organizations like So Others Might Eat.Members also planted more than a dozen cherry, apple, and plum trees by the fence around the perimeter, allowing passersby to share in enjoying the bounty

How To Start A Nonprofit Community Garden

How To Start A Nonprofit Community Garden

This fact sheet is designed to give many different groups the basic information they need to get their gardening project off the ground.Who will the garden serve--kids, seniors, special populations,people who just want an alternative to trash?Form committees to accomplish tasks: Funding & Resource Development; Youth Activities; Construction; Communication.Contributions of land, tools, seeds, fencing, soil improvements or money are all vital to a successful community garden.Churches, schools, citizens groups, private businesses, local parks and recreation departments are all potential supporters.Have a rainproof bulletin board for announcing garden events and messages.Arrange for land preparation--plowing, etc--or let gardeners do their own prep.Lay out garden to place flower or shrub beds around the visible perimeter.This helps to promote good will with non-gardening neighbors, passersby, and municipal authorities.Will the group do certain things cooperatively (such as turning in soil in the spring, planting cover crops, or composting)?It is becoming increasingly difficult to obtain leases from landowners without public liability insurance.Leaders "rise to the occasion" to propose ideas and carry out tasks.However, as the work load expands, many groups choose a more formal structure for their organization.It is a conscious, planned effort to create a system so that each person can participate fully and the group can perform effectively.Try out suggestions raised at these meetings and after a few months of operation, you'll be in a better position to develop bylaws or organizational guidelines.Many battles are won simply because one side has more pieces of paper to wave than the other.Guidelines and Rules (see TROUBLESHOOTING for examples) are less formal than Bylaws, and are often adequate enough for a garden group that has no intention of incorporating.State what officers are necessary, how they are chosen, length of term, their duties and how vacancies are filled.Establish a system so that bylaws can be rescinded or amended, maybe by a simple majority."We the undersigned members of the (name) garden group hereby agree to hold harmless (name owner) from and against any damage, loss, liability, claim, demand, suit, cost and expense directly or indirectly resulting from, arising out of or in connection with the use of the (name) garden by the garden group, its successors, assigns, employees, agents and invites.".In order to offer a high quality community garden program, good management techniques are essential.Included in this fact sheet are the main ideas to consider in management, along with many different ways to carry them out.I understand that neither the garden group nor owners of the land are responsible for my actions.They serve as much to mark possession of a property as to prevent entry, since nothing short of razor-wire and landmines will keep a determined vandal from getting in.Short picket fences or turkeywire will keep out dogs and honest people.Create a shady meeting area in the garden and spend time there.Plant potatoes, other root crops or a less popular vegetable such as kohlrabi along the sidewalk or fence.Plant the purple varieties of cauliflower and beans or the white eggplant to confuse a vandal.The "children's garden" can help market your idea to local scout troops, day cares, foster grandparent programs, church groups, etc.Neighbors complain to municipal governments about messy, unkempt gardens or rowdy behavior; most gardens can ill afford poor relations with neighbors, local politicians or potential sponsors.Therefore, choose bylaws carefully so you have procedures to follow when members fail to keep their plots clean and up to code.A well-organized garden with strong leadership and committed members can overcome almost any obstacle.Cooperative Extension Service in your county Women's Garden Club.Fact Sheets and articles on the following are available free of charge to ACGA members:

How To Make A Successful Community Garden

How To Make A Successful Community Garden

We’ll give you the basics about community gardens, describe the benefits you’ll reap, and explain the steps to take to start and manage a community garden program at your assisted site.They can range in size from one communal raised bed, to hundreds or thousands of square feet of individual plots, to several acres.Community gardens provide numerous benefits to residents and to assisted sites.The Insider consulted experts around the country who have started and managed resident community gardens at assisted sites.They gave us a list of 10 steps to take to start and manage a successful community garden program at your site:.Assign a point person from site staff to lead the planning process and oversee the gardening program.Other sites use their service coordinator office or HUD Neighborhood Networks program staff to oversee gardening programs, or even recruit AmeriCorps or Vista volunteers to do the major legwork.These volunteers often live at the site as part of their stipend and also become resident garden leaders.The staff member’s involvement can range from direct planning and supervision of the garden to being a point of contact for residents and partner organizations who will actually plan and run the garden program.Make sure the staffer you’ve assigned knows he or she must stay involved throughout the planning process and the gardening season, regularly visit the garden, and communicate directly and regularly with residents, says Michael Harris, sustainability projects coordinator at Foundation Communities in Austin, Texas.Success of your site’s gardening program begins and ends with resident engagement and participation in the planning process, says Beth Keel, sustainability initiatives liaison for the San Antonio Housing Authority (SAHA), who oversees 12 community gardens for residents of SAHA sites.He recommends you survey your residents to gauge their interest in gardening and their desired level of participation.Practical Pointer: Survey and involve maintenance and other site staff, as well as residents, even if they aren’t assigned to manage the program, says Harris.It also builds employee morale and creates working relationships among staff members who would otherwise not interact, says Erika Slaymaker, environmental sustainability coordinator at Project H.O.M.E.Instead, they partner with experienced community organizations to work with the site staff and residents to plan, fund, install, and/or manage the garden.It’s important to partner with organizations that are truly based in the community and have existing relationships with other organizations that can support your garden program, says Mac Levine, founder and executive director of Concrete Safaris, an organization that runs gardening programs at NYCHA sites involving thousands of residents and tens of thousands of square feet of growing space.You may want to partner with several organizations that can contribute to different aspects of the program, such as gardening supplies, soil and other resources, funding, technical assistance, access to volunteers, educational opportunities, and potential income or vocational training opportunities for residents.At least one of your partners should have local experience and expertise in gardening, soil health, and growing food in small spaces, says Levine.The degree of involvement of your partner organization is up to you, depending on the size and needs of your garden program.But choose partners that have the time and capacity to help manage the program and will stay involved along with your site’s staff, says Harris.If not, or as a water supplement and conservation measure, consider collecting rainwater from rooftops.Plants grow best in soil that drains well and doesn’t dry out too quickly.Avoid areas where puddles form when it rains or are too sandy and dry.Almost all states have an agriculture extension service or soil-testing lab where you can send soil samples for testing for fertility and the presence of contaminants and heavy metals such as lead or arsenic.Make sure that the site has adequate access to deliver soil and other heavy supplies.Assess existing structures, fences, rocks, cement, shrubs, and trees to determine which you’ll need to move and which you can keep or reuse for the garden (for example, using a cement area for garden tables, or large trees as a shady area for resident gatherings).Determine if gas lines, water mains, or septic tanks exist below the area.Once you’ve chosen your garden’s location, hold planning meetings with partners, assigned staff, and resident leaders to: (1) spell out the vision and features for the garden; (2) design the space; and (3) assign planning, design, and construction tasks.You’ll probably have to hold more than one meeting to make sure everyone understands his role and responsibilities in garden planning, installation, and day-to-day management, says Levine.The garden team should create a plan that addresses the following topics:.If your garden is primarily for elderly or disabled residents, for example, you’ll want to install raised beds that are wheelchair accessible and high enough so residents can reach from all sides without heavy bending, says Keel.She recommends making at least a portion of any garden accessible for residents with disabilities and to make all of it accessible if you manage sites specifically for or have a large percentage of elderly and disabled residents.But if your garden is for families or youth, and your soil is in good health, planting in beds directly in the ground is fine.You’ll also want to decide if the garden spaces will be communal, meaning the residents share all the space and work on the garden together, or will consist of individual plots or raised beds, says Burkett.If your garden’s purpose is education, youth empowerment, community building, or therapy for older or disabled residents, you can use shared growing spaces that residents can plant and harvest together, says Sandra Gray of Bickerdike Redevelopment Corporation.Also, you can keep better track of individual plots if they are in raised beds, and gardeners have less risk of plants being trampled or eaten by animals.You don’t need to chose the varieties—leave that up to the resident gardeners to decide—just consider the types so you can better plan the overall design.Types of plants residents can grow in community gardens are:.But some municipalities bar the raising of bees, poultry, or other farm animals, and you can face fines if you don’t follow the law.If you’re considering having a beehive or raising chickens for eggs, be sure to consult your site’s attorney to find out what local laws govern these practices.Decide the timeline for installing the garden and whether you’ll pay professionals or use volunteers to do the work, including cleaning the site, turning sod, building raised beds and structures, ordering soil, filling beds, ordering or starting plants, and setting up the watering system.In addition to growing food for residents to use at home, many gardens have educational and vocational activities.HUD rules encourage site owners and managers to create educational and vocational opportunities, and a garden is a good way to create these opportunities (see HUD Handbook 4381.5, Chapter 9: Neighborhood Networks Fact Sheet).HUD rules encourage owners and managers to educate residents on energy and other conservation issues, so incorporating these practices into your garden could help reduce water, energy, and waste costs at your site in the long run.Reduce water consumption by using rainwater tanks, mulching, efficient irrigation, and low-water plants; and.Path materials (wood chips, straw, pebbles, flagstone);.Trees, perennial plants, shrubs, and large bushes for shared/perimeter gardens.Step #7: Hold Launch Meeting, Create Garden Rules.Having residents create rules will keep them invested in the garden throughout the season and empower them to help prevent problems later.Spell out residents’ responsibility to supervise the behavior of nonresident guests [Rules, par.Spell out prohibited behavior, such as use of drugs, alcohol, firearms, tobacco, fireworks, and open fires (other than barbecue) [Rules, par.Require that all major garden equipment, such as rototillers, lawn mowers, power trimmers, and saws be used only by maintenance staff or by specified trained individuals over the age of 16 [Rules, par.State written warning notice and termination procedures for not complying with garden rules.If more residents apply than there are available individual beds, take their agreements anyway, and put their names on a waiting list.Depending on the garden program, waitlisted residents still may participate in communal activities.Be sure to add an indemnification clause to any garden agreement to avoid liability for injuries and damage caused by residents.To the extent permitted by law, Resident shall indemnify and hold harmless ABC Apartments, its managing agent, and its respective officers, directors, beneficiaries, shareholders, partners, agents, and employees from and against all fines, suits, damages, claims, demands, losses, and actions (including attorney’s fees) arising out of, or relating to, all acts, failures, omissions, and negligence of Resident, his or her agents, employees, visitors, guests, invitees, and contractors, arising out of or in any way relating to Resident’s use of the garden.Holding regular meetings will keep residents involved in the garden and ensure that any problems that arise are solved quickly.Conduct group activities, such as soil preparation, communal planting, composting, weeding, and harvesting; and.Plus, funders love to see photos of gardeners in action and hear about bottom-line successes, like the total pounds of produce grown or the amount of money residents saved in food costs throughout the season, says Slaymaker.Grants from partners, local government, and gardening, educational, and environmental organizations;.Here’s a list of Web sites with more information about starting your garden program, including where to find funding, technical assistance, volunteers, and supplies:.This Special Issue of the Insider was written by Carolyn Zezima, Esq., who is the president of NYC Foodscape (www.nycfoodscape.com), and a consultant with a track record of grass-rooting and managing organizations in the nonprofit sector.While in Illinois, Ms

What Does Urban Gardening Mean

What Does Urban Gardening Mean

With a growing awareness of the quality of food we eat, urban gardening is one of the most promising agriculture trends on the rise.You can also save substantial amounts of money growing your own fruits and vegetables instead of buying them from your local grocery.Starting your own garden may seem to be a challenging task, but fear not, we’re here to make it easy and ultimately more rewarding!You can start your garden on an apartment rooftop, balcony, deck, patio, or yard.There are a wide variety of vegetables and fruits that you can grow on a raised garden bed, including:.There is just something inexplicably beautiful and gratifying about seeing tiny seedlings mature into strong healthy plants.Within a few weeks of starting, the tiny seedlings will cover your raised garden bed with their petite and delicate leaves

What Do I Need To Paint Garden Fence

What Do I Need To Paint Garden Fence

Either way, both paint and stain put up a good case for consideration.Paint sits on the surface of the fence, covering the timber.This can increase moisture content, which results in potential problems with rotting

How Build A Community Garden

How Build A Community Garden

This fact sheet is designed to give many different groups the basic information they need to get their gardening project off the ground.Who will the garden serve--kids, seniors, special populations,people who just want an alternative to trash?Form committees to accomplish tasks: Funding & Resource Development; Youth Activities; Construction; Communication.Contributions of land, tools, seeds, fencing, soil improvements or money are all vital to a successful community garden.Churches, schools, citizens groups, private businesses, local parks and recreation departments are all potential supporters.Have a rainproof bulletin board for announcing garden events and messages.Arrange for land preparation--plowing, etc--or let gardeners do their own prep.Lay out garden to place flower or shrub beds around the visible perimeter.This helps to promote good will with non-gardening neighbors, passersby, and municipal authorities.Will the group do certain things cooperatively (such as turning in soil in the spring, planting cover crops, or composting)?It is becoming increasingly difficult to obtain leases from landowners without public liability insurance.Leaders "rise to the occasion" to propose ideas and carry out tasks.However, as the work load expands, many groups choose a more formal structure for their organization.It is a conscious, planned effort to create a system so that each person can participate fully and the group can perform effectively.Try out suggestions raised at these meetings and after a few months of operation, you'll be in a better position to develop bylaws or organizational guidelines.Many battles are won simply because one side has more pieces of paper to wave than the other.Guidelines and Rules (see TROUBLESHOOTING for examples) are less formal than Bylaws, and are often adequate enough for a garden group that has no intention of incorporating.State what officers are necessary, how they are chosen, length of term, their duties and how vacancies are filled.Establish a system so that bylaws can be rescinded or amended, maybe by a simple majority."We the undersigned members of the (name) garden group hereby agree to hold harmless (name owner) from and against any damage, loss, liability, claim, demand, suit, cost and expense directly or indirectly resulting from, arising out of or in connection with the use of the (name) garden by the garden group, its successors, assigns, employees, agents and invites.".In order to offer a high quality community garden program, good management techniques are essential.Included in this fact sheet are the main ideas to consider in management, along with many different ways to carry them out.I understand that neither the garden group nor owners of the land are responsible for my actions.They serve as much to mark possession of a property as to prevent entry, since nothing short of razor-wire and landmines will keep a determined vandal from getting in.Short picket fences or turkeywire will keep out dogs and honest people.Create a shady meeting area in the garden and spend time there.Plant potatoes, other root crops or a less popular vegetable such as kohlrabi along the sidewalk or fence.Plant the purple varieties of cauliflower and beans or the white eggplant to confuse a vandal.The "children's garden" can help market your idea to local scout troops, day cares, foster grandparent programs, church groups, etc.Neighbors complain to municipal governments about messy, unkempt gardens or rowdy behavior; most gardens can ill afford poor relations with neighbors, local politicians or potential sponsors.Therefore, choose bylaws carefully so you have procedures to follow when members fail to keep their plots clean and up to code.A well-organized garden with strong leadership and committed members can overcome almost any obstacle.Cooperative Extension Service in your county Women's Garden Club.Fact Sheets and articles on the following are available free of charge to ACGA members:

How To Start A Community Garden At School

How To Start A Community Garden At School

Consider individual resources and skill-sets so that you’ve got your bases covered for all aspects of the project, from fund raising to fence building and seed planting to local public relations.For starters, you will want to take your climate into consideration, noting how much exposure to sunlight the garden will need – aim for full sun in an under utilized yet highly visible area of the school grounds.Pick seeds for fruits and vegetables that respond well to community-type gardens in moderate climates and ensure adequate access to water and drainage systems and tool storage.In addition, keep in mind that this garden is going up on school grounds, which means that it will need to be established in an area separate from where students partake in outdoor activities and sports.Simply setting up a Facebook profile or page on the school’s website that gives the local community and organizations the opportunity to donate to the effort can make a big difference.For example, your local home and gardening center could provide your school with the necessary soil and seeds needed to get started, receiving recognition as a sponsor in exchange.It’s a great experience for students to plant seeds in the early spring and harvest them before they leave for summer break, and such a thing is necessary to keep the interest of children at K to Grade 3 levels.Depending upon your climate, produce such as blueberries, avocados, and lemon trees make for great long haul school garden additions that can span relative generations of students.It should be made evident (for invested parties) that the knowledge and skills developed by students in a well thought-out school garden are directly related to the academics of their institution

Why Do We Need Garden Bed

Why Do We Need Garden Bed

Let’s talk about the potential drawbacks and benefits of using raised garden beds (compared to planting directly in the ground) – so you can decide what suits you best.In the simplest of terms, a raised garden bed is a container or box full of soil in which plants are grown.This creates a slightly mounded in-ground garden bed; a distinct planting area from the surrounding yard space.A number of the perks of raised beds are undeniable, like the added ability to control burrowing pests.Ideal garden soil is rich with organic matter, has a texture that is loose enough to easily allow root growth, will readily absorb water, but is also well-draining.It lacks structure, air pockets for microbial life, and water runs right off the top – unless it is already thoroughly saturated, which takes a lot of effort to do.Therefore, we always mix in a good amount of compost and bagged soil when we plant trees or shrubs directly in the ground.In general, I always recommend an absolute minimum depth of 1 foot tall raised garden beds.Raised garden beds are more accessible for people who use a wheelchair, walker, or otherwise have trouble bending over or stooping.If you do have limited mobility or back issues, make your raised beds no more than 4 feet wide; my recommended maximum width in general.Growing food (or other plants) in raised garden beds provides an extra layer of defense against pests.The frame and height of the raised bed serves as an obstacle and potential deterrent for pests like slugs, snails, and rabbits.That is, unless they’re quite determined – but then it is really easy to add hoops and floating row covers tucked neatly over the beds to block them altogether.This way, our plants are safe (ahem, survive…) without embarking on a constant battle or resorting to traps, poison, or other harsh means.Raised beds can also be built tall enough to dissuade dogs or chickens from getting into them, especially if you attach an easy DIY trellis that doubles as a fence!Chicken wire is cheaper and sometimes used instead of hardware cloth to line the bottom of beds or create gopher baskets.Protect crops from above using hoops and row covers – a pest control technique that can be used for both in-ground or raised bed gardening.You can’t stop burrowing pests when you grow things directly in the ground – unless you make individual gopher baskets for each plant.Similar to blocking out pests, raised beds have the advantage of allowing less weed intrusion than in-ground gardens.First and foremost, if you fill your raised garden beds with fresh weed-free soil, they’re far less likely to grow weeds inside them at all.The tall borders created by a raised bed prevents weeds from creeping in from the garden pathways around them.Consequently, we lined the entire area with commercial-duty landscape fabric* to prevent the crabgrass from growing in our raised beds or surrounding gravel.*Note: I highly recommend using a commercial-grade weed barrier fabric (like this one we have always used, or this other highly-rated option) over the really thin black plastic-like material commonly sold in garden centers.Adding cardboard, commercial-duty landscape fabric, and a buried border/edge to an area that we removed weedy crabgrass before installing raised beds.In this garden space, you can see that the weed-blocking landscape fabric extends a good foot beyond the edge of the new raised beds, later to be covered by mulch.Personally, I love the added visual interest that raised beds bring to a garden space.Planter boxes of different sizes, heights and shapes can be placed to create unique and attractive garden designs.The distinct edges and borders prevent pathway ground cover like gravel or bark mulch from spilling into the planting area itself.You can add raised beds to a patio area, balcony, terraced into the side of hill or slope, or even create a rooftop garden.We are always on the lookout for additional growing space, and the driveway area receives excellent midday to afternoon sun.When installing a raised garden bed on top of a solid surface, such as a patio or balcony, there are a few things to take into consideration.The beds have a wood bottom that drains between the cracks, is lined with porous landscape fabric to keep the soil in, and sit on a 1500 pound rated furniture dolly with wheels for mobility.A few ways to make filling raised garden beds more economical is to source local quality soil and compost in bulk.We created our gardens and added raised beds in stages, staggering mini-projects over several years to spread the cost out.Another way to lessen the cost of filling beds is to embrace an emerging trend in gardening: the concept of hugelkultur!In hugelkultur, you fill some of the bottom empty space in the bed with logs, branches and/or bark from around your property before adding a good foot of soil on top.If you want to build your own raised garden beds, it does require a bit of handy work, muscle, and tools.You’ll also need to be able to work through some basic calculations to design the beds and purchase the appropriate size and amount of lumber.To make it even easier, I have created this step-by-step tutorial (video included) on how to design and build a raised garden bed.For example, stone or block raised garden beds will last longer than wooden planter boxes.In-ground gardens provide more flexibility for creative shapes and form fewer hard lines than raised beds.For example, our cobblestone-bordered planting areas, curved pathways, and billowing shrubs and flowers bring balance to the structured raised beds

How To Start A Community Garden In Australia

How To Start A Community Garden In Australia

The Plant A Seed Foundation stands by our mandate to support such initiatives throughout the nation and thus this week’s blog post will walk you through the process so that your dream of stepping outside of your front door to join your neighbors in the rich soil fast becomes a reality.There will be some red tape involved before you hammer the wooden stakes into the dirt surrounding your community garden so be sure to get it out of the way as soon as your committee has been formed.For example, in Greater Vancouver BC the City & Park Board supports urban agriculture projects and asks that you complete an Expression of Interest form to begin the process.Together with your committee and reference material from governing bodies and supportive organizations you will be well prepared to select a site in your community for the garden.You’ll need to consider adequate exposure to sunlight, convenient access to water and drainage, automobile and pedestrian traffic, and everything else that you can anticipate will impact the success of a community garden.You will of course need to have permission from landowners (the city or on private residential property management) and obtain the necessary lease agreements (where applicable) and insurance policies.Contact local businesses and organizations to see if they are willing to provide support in ways that can include financial endowments, materials used to build the agricultural site, and seeds for planting.Sponsors can be local credit unions, retailers, churches, schools, home & garden suppliers, grocery stores or any other that comes to mind.In addition to the essentials a good sponsor can serve to add special touches to your community garden such as ornate benches to relax in contemplation after a hard day of working in the soil.However the purpose of this first edition is to get those of you excited about the prospect of a new neighborhood garden started down the path to a greener thumb for your entire community

How To Promote A Community Garden

How To Promote A Community Garden

While we have offered our advice on how to manage the challenges of such an undertaking, there is one topic we have yet to tackle, one that takes place away from the soil yet is of no less importance.This challenge (or opportunity) involves generating word of mouth for your community garden in order to get much needed support.This support is necessary to the longevity of your local agricultural project, as you will need outside volunteers, supplies and donations in order to grow your garden to the self-sustaining entity that it can be.Consider your resources, your unique location, and let the creative juices flow – every garden/farm is inherently special, you just need to find out what makes yours so.This creates a domino effect that trickles through each individual and their own respective networks until word about your community garden has spread, providing you with a platform to discuss up and coming events and opportunities for others to lend a hand in support.There are free templates, cheap monthly subscriptions, and simple WordPress themes than allow even novices to create a basic website for their community project.If this proves challenging, there are website development firms in your area that may take on non-profit jobs for free to help support their community and garner goodwill while adding value to their portfolio.), to make public announcements (up and coming farmers markets you’re involved in) and to serve as a base where which your social media efforts can link back to.Essentially, by maintaining a website for your community garden you provide interested parties (volunteers and financial/supply supporters) with a portal where they can learn more before making the decision to contact you.Getting the story of your community garden picked up by local media is a very effective way to garner additional support for your project.Second, by having a website in place you will have provided them (media) with instant access to content (photos, stories, and information on figureheads involved) about your community garden project

How To Sustain A Community Garden

How To Sustain A Community Garden

The 462 Halsey Community Garden is a robust, volunteer-run farm where residents grow more than just food.Now, 462 Halsey is one of 60 community gardens that provide lush green space and locally grown food to the neighborhood’s 150,000 residents, more than 67 percent of whose households are enrolled in SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program).By growing vegetables, fruits and herbs within blocks of thousands of Brooklyn residents, 462 Halsey is increasing access to organic produce.From its inception, 462 Halsey built its garden space with only salvaged, donated and recycled materials, creating growing beds, compost bins, signs, seating and more from bricks, pallets, cinder blocks and boards.Forbes Spear describes this move as strategic, diverting the volunteers’ time spent on watering to other productive tasks, such as weeding and tending to the compost.Since opening its gates in 2012, the program has encouraged nearby residents to return their nutrient-rich food scraps to the garden.Volunteers then churn the food scraps into compost, which gardeners add to the soil to help their plants grow.In 2012–2013, the community garden partnered weekly with a class of public school students with autism.Notably, Forbes Spears describes 462 Halsey’s Safe Space policy, which states that the community garden “strives to be a safe and welcoming space for everyone who comes into the garden,” where members and visitors “will constructively confront and stop any oppressive behavior or language.” 462 Halsey is a place where both long-standing residents and new faces are welcomed; senior citizens work alongside transgender volunteers, forging connections that may have never occurred outside the garden

What Makes A Healing Garden

What Makes A Healing Garden

There is even research to support the idea that outdoor spaces, drawing on certain design concepts, can deliver more than the usual benefits of a pretty garden bed along a winding path

How To Start A School Garden

How To Start A School Garden

What other items (compost bin, tool shed, potting tables or benches, trellises, etc.).While a traditional in-ground garden is the simplest to install, it requires that good quality soil be available onsite.Benefits of in-ground gardens include flexibility, good moisture retention, and the ability to add cold frames or hoop houses as needed to extend the growing season.Raised beds are commonly used in school gardens because they make weed control easy and are accessible for all ages and abilities.Any garden beds that have bottoms fitted to them must be designed to ensure good drainage

How Do I Start A Community Garden

How Do I Start A Community Garden

The Plant A Seed Foundation stands by our mandate to support such initiatives throughout the nation and thus this week’s blog post will walk you through the process so that your dream of stepping outside of your front door to join your neighbors in the rich soil fast becomes a reality.There will be some red tape involved before you hammer the wooden stakes into the dirt surrounding your community garden so be sure to get it out of the way as soon as your committee has been formed.For example, in Greater Vancouver BC the City & Park Board supports urban agriculture projects and asks that you complete an Expression of Interest form to begin the process.Together with your committee and reference material from governing bodies and supportive organizations you will be well prepared to select a site in your community for the garden.You’ll need to consider adequate exposure to sunlight, convenient access to water and drainage, automobile and pedestrian traffic, and everything else that you can anticipate will impact the success of a community garden.You will of course need to have permission from landowners (the city or on private residential property management) and obtain the necessary lease agreements (where applicable) and insurance policies.Contact local businesses and organizations to see if they are willing to provide support in ways that can include financial endowments, materials used to build the agricultural site, and seeds for planting.Sponsors can be local credit unions, retailers, churches, schools, home & garden suppliers, grocery stores or any other that comes to mind.In addition to the essentials a good sponsor can serve to add special touches to your community garden such as ornate benches to relax in contemplation after a hard day of working in the soil.However the purpose of this first edition is to get those of you excited about the prospect of a new neighborhood garden started down the path to a greener thumb for your entire community

How To Start An Urban Farm Or Community Garden

How To Start An Urban Farm Or Community Garden

What other hobby gets you exercising, spending time in the great outdoors, and provides you with delicious, nutritious food after all that effort?A community garden can be the answer to the urban farmer’s woes and provide the added benefit of social interaction.Find a space that could be transformed into garden plots, look for abandoned urban lots with agreeable ownersand get to work!If your apartment or neighborhood has some land available and some of your neighbors share your passion for all things green, lobby for a community garden.Consider partnering with a local food bank or hunger program to grow a community garden for low-income families.Many food pantries around the country have begun just this sort of project, including HOTEL INC

How To Community Gardens Work

How To Community Gardens Work

From increasing access to fresh produce, to encouraging outdoor exercise and social interaction, to improving air and soil quality, to reducing crime, the list of perks is quite long.What gets less press are the problems many community gardens face, from theft to toxic soil to culture clashes.But before you leave your shovel in the dirt and run off your plot forever, see if you can find some help and hope in our roundup of….In a communal system, there are no assigned plots; members can work on whatever parts of the garden they choose, and can claim whatever produce they see fit.While some gardeners like the more open, collective feeling of a communal setup, many find it results in “the tragedy of the commons,” aka: when shared spaces go unregulated, they are often neglected or exploited because no one is in charge.When members stop showing up, their plots can become overgrown or go to seed, inviting pests and keeping the garden from looking its best.In addition, you can consider collecting a one-time maintenance deposit: if the member wants to leave the garden and has kept their plot in good order, they get their money back.If they want to leave and haven’t been keeping it up—or, if they just stop coming—their deposit becomes a “cleanup fee” and stays in the garden’s general fund.Setting expectations from the start can help gardeners make the necessary time in their schedules, and reviewing the sign-in log can show who’s been missing from duty.Gardener pro-tip : Instead of installing ugly—and possibly illegal —barbed wire at the top of your fence, try planting thorny bougainvillea or pyracantha as a deterrent to climb-overs!Your garden may bring in funds by many means: collecting member fees, organizing crowdfunding campaigns , receiving grants, etc.But let’s face it: Any time strangers mix, you can’t always bank on good behavior.” Cultural differences, territorial feelings, and the simple act of getting to know one another can all breed tension and conflict.In the same vein, schedule monthly or quarterly all-member meetings to discuss any current events, goals, and problems.Offering a written account of what was discussed, or enlisting a bilingual garden member or friend could go a long way to help.Planning and participating in gatherings that are purely for fun can help neighbors get to know each other socially, rather than in the work-focused context of everyday gardening and organizational management.Another way to build understanding and smooth communication with your community is to plan a few programs every year that are open to the public as well as members.Your garden members get to show off their work, you’ll make some new fans and possibly new recruits, and everyone will feel like they’re part of it

How To Start A Neighborhood Garden

How To Start A Neighborhood Garden

The Plant A Seed Foundation stands by our mandate to support such initiatives throughout the nation and thus this week’s blog post will walk you through the process so that your dream of stepping outside of your front door to join your neighbors in the rich soil fast becomes a reality.There will be some red tape involved before you hammer the wooden stakes into the dirt surrounding your community garden so be sure to get it out of the way as soon as your committee has been formed.For example, in Greater Vancouver BC the City & Park Board supports urban agriculture projects and asks that you complete an Expression of Interest form to begin the process.Together with your committee and reference material from governing bodies and supportive organizations you will be well prepared to select a site in your community for the garden.You’ll need to consider adequate exposure to sunlight, convenient access to water and drainage, automobile and pedestrian traffic, and everything else that you can anticipate will impact the success of a community garden.You will of course need to have permission from landowners (the city or on private residential property management) and obtain the necessary lease agreements (where applicable) and insurance policies.Contact local businesses and organizations to see if they are willing to provide support in ways that can include financial endowments, materials used to build the agricultural site, and seeds for planting.Sponsors can be local credit unions, retailers, churches, schools, home & garden suppliers, grocery stores or any other that comes to mind.In addition to the essentials a good sponsor can serve to add special touches to your community garden such as ornate benches to relax in contemplation after a hard day of working in the soil.However the purpose of this first edition is to get those of you excited about the prospect of a new neighborhood garden started down the path to a greener thumb for your entire community

What Do I Need To Paint Garden Shed

What Do I Need To Paint Garden Shed

And, if you've been eyeing up our shed ideas, you might be in the mood to give your own a spruce, especially now that warmer weather is on its way.Maybe you'll opt for a vibrant colour to make your shed a feature, or something more natural to blend into surrounding greenery.Whatever colour you choose, painting a shed is a surefire way to add personality to your plot.5L tin of paint – try Cuprinol Garden Shades for lots of lovely colours and prolonged weather protection.Passiflora shed by M&L Paints Alitex Collection (Image credit: M&L Paints/Charlotte Young PR).Maybe there's a few cobwebs nestled in the cracks, a smattering of dirt along the door from muddy boots, or even a patch of algae lurking on the shady side.And, if there's algae around, then you'll need to use a bit of warm soapy water to clean it off, then rinse and leave to dry before proceeding.If your shed has windows, then cover them with newspaper, secured by putting masking tape along the edges.You can use a paint roller for large areas, or a wide fence and shed brush if your prefer.Paint your shed's doors and architectural details a different colour for a pretty look (Image credit: Russell Sadur/Future).From Cuprinol's Garden Shades, we love the bold orange of 'Honey Mango', the radiant 'Dazzling Yellow', or the inky 'Black Ash'.A shed painted in one of these tones will make a fabulous addition to our modern garden ideas.Well, if you love a romantic look and our cottage garden ideas, then opt for pretty pastels or simple white.Some prefer a more pared-back look for their shed – if that's the case, you can't go wrong with the deep green hue of Cuprinol's 'Holly' tone, or the rich brown of 'Seasoned Oak'.And in terms of season, spring is a great time of year to paint your shed, to help your garden look its very best come summer

How To Plant The Perfect Vegetable Garden

How To Plant The Perfect Vegetable Garden

If you’re like the other 21 million people in North America who will be starting a vegetable garden this year for the first time, chances are, a few time-tested tips will come in handy to ensure success.Even seasoned veterans don’t tire of being reminded of the most essential steps to a bountiful garden.A home vegetable garden is easy to start and doesn’t require as much effort as one might think to keep it growing strong.For most vegetable plants, one inch of water per week, which includes any natural rainfall, is adequate .These deliver water slowly, on target allowing roots time to absorb the moisture and soil to adequately hydrate and helps keep foliage dry.It also helps retain moisture, suppress weeds and acts as a protective barrier from diseases splashing up onto the plants from the soil.Although pests are usually a given at some point in any vegetable garden, by exercising patience, nature will usually take care of the problem.As long as you practice the steps mentioned so far, you’ve already taken adequate measures to promote the growth of healthy plants which are better able to stand up to potential pest invasions.If you put into practice what I’ve suggested above, you’ll get your garden off to the right start and set it up for a fruitful season.Preparation is key with the reward being a healthier, more productive garden and fresh food that tastes better than anything you can buy in the store

What Is The Role Of Community Gardening

What Is The Role Of Community Gardening

They can be a beneficial addition to many communities by increasing the availability of nutritious foods, strengthening community ties, reducing environmental hazards, reducing food miles and creating a more sustainable system.Humans, plants and animals can all benefit from urban agriculture since it creates habitats and improves the ecology of the area.The addition of gardens to these areas may improve nutrition and increase the consumption of fruits and vegetables.Residents in areas with high crime rates may experience cardiovascular disease and mental health disorders.The consequences of vacant lands are decreased property values, drug use, and the illegal dumping of litter, tires and chemicals [6].Gardens can improve economic opportunities by training volunteers and selling food at farmers’ markets [1].Urban agriculture can teach residents useful skills in planning, food production and business.Recently, there has been a resurgence of community gardens to help mitigate the impacts of food deserts and as a use for the increased number of vacant lands present in urban areas.Community gardens can provide fresh, healthy produce for residents and allow them to reduce their food bills.The USDA’s Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service has implemented a grant program to help decrease the impact of food deserts in low-income communities.They strive to provide long-term food security by supporting local agriculture projects while also improving economic, social and environmental problems.Soil contamination and acquiring land can become a challenge in implementing a community garden.The Chicago Park District along with People’s Gas help provides resources to community gardens.Community Food Security Coalition’s North American Initiative on Urban Agriculture.More Than Just An Eyesore: Local Insights And Solutions on Vacant Land And Urban Health

What To Eat At Gardens

What To Eat At Gardens

Pay once and enjoy delicious meals and exclusive benefits throughout the day with the purchase of the All-Day Dine Deal.• Up to one entrée, one side item or dessert and one beverage each time through the line, once every 90 minutes.1 entrée platter, side or dessert and one fountain soft drink or Dasani® bottled water once every 90 minutes at any of the following locations: Zagora Café, Oasis Pizza at Serengeti Overlook, Dragon Fire Grill, Zambia Smokehouse and Chick-fil-A®.Items included in All-Day Dining Deal are marked with colored dots

Community Garden How To Make

Community Garden How To Make

This fact sheet is designed to give many different groups the basic information they need to get their gardening project off the ground.Who will the garden serve--kids, seniors, special populations,people who just want an alternative to trash?Form committees to accomplish tasks: Funding & Resource Development; Youth Activities; Construction; Communication.Contributions of land, tools, seeds, fencing, soil improvements or money are all vital to a successful community garden.Churches, schools, citizens groups, private businesses, local parks and recreation departments are all potential supporters.Have a rainproof bulletin board for announcing garden events and messages.Arrange for land preparation--plowing, etc--or let gardeners do their own prep.Lay out garden to place flower or shrub beds around the visible perimeter.This helps to promote good will with non-gardening neighbors, passersby, and municipal authorities.Will the group do certain things cooperatively (such as turning in soil in the spring, planting cover crops, or composting)?It is becoming increasingly difficult to obtain leases from landowners without public liability insurance.Leaders "rise to the occasion" to propose ideas and carry out tasks.However, as the work load expands, many groups choose a more formal structure for their organization.It is a conscious, planned effort to create a system so that each person can participate fully and the group can perform effectively.Try out suggestions raised at these meetings and after a few months of operation, you'll be in a better position to develop bylaws or organizational guidelines.Many battles are won simply because one side has more pieces of paper to wave than the other.Guidelines and Rules (see TROUBLESHOOTING for examples) are less formal than Bylaws, and are often adequate enough for a garden group that has no intention of incorporating.State what officers are necessary, how they are chosen, length of term, their duties and how vacancies are filled.Establish a system so that bylaws can be rescinded or amended, maybe by a simple majority."We the undersigned members of the (name) garden group hereby agree to hold harmless (name owner) from and against any damage, loss, liability, claim, demand, suit, cost and expense directly or indirectly resulting from, arising out of or in connection with the use of the (name) garden by the garden group, its successors, assigns, employees, agents and invites.".In order to offer a high quality community garden program, good management techniques are essential.Included in this fact sheet are the main ideas to consider in management, along with many different ways to carry them out.I understand that neither the garden group nor owners of the land are responsible for my actions.They serve as much to mark possession of a property as to prevent entry, since nothing short of razor-wire and landmines will keep a determined vandal from getting in.Short picket fences or turkeywire will keep out dogs and honest people.Create a shady meeting area in the garden and spend time there.Plant potatoes, other root crops or a less popular vegetable such as kohlrabi along the sidewalk or fence.Plant the purple varieties of cauliflower and beans or the white eggplant to confuse a vandal.The "children's garden" can help market your idea to local scout troops, day cares, foster grandparent programs, church groups, etc.Neighbors complain to municipal governments about messy, unkempt gardens or rowdy behavior; most gardens can ill afford poor relations with neighbors, local politicians or potential sponsors.Therefore, choose bylaws carefully so you have procedures to follow when members fail to keep their plots clean and up to code.A well-organized garden with strong leadership and committed members can overcome almost any obstacle.Cooperative Extension Service in your county Women's Garden Club.Fact Sheets and articles on the following are available free of charge to ACGA members: